2006 NIJ Conference Speaker Bios

NOTE. Affiliations listed are those of the speaker at the time of the conference.

Sudhir Aggarwal is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Florida State University. Prior to becoming a Professor, he was the Chief Technology Officer of the Internet Content Delivery and Distribution Business Unit of Lucent Technologies. Before joining Lucent, he was a Professor and the Chairperson of the Computer Science Department at the State University of New York-Binghamton. His research includes computer and communication networks and building software tools and systems in support of cyber-security, digital forensics, and law enforcement. Dr. Aggarwal received his Ph.D. in Computer and Communication Sciences from the University of Michigan in 1975.

Anne Marie Ambrose is Director of Juvenile Justice Services for the State of Pennsylvania. She began her career in Philadelphia, first as an attorney in the Defender Association and then as the Deputy Commissioner for Juvenile Justice Services. Her accomplishments include detention reform and building a new reintegration model for youth. Throughout her career, Ms. Ambrose has focused on improving services for youth in the juvenile justice system. She is the Vice President and Chairperson of the Girls in Youth Justice Committee of the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators, where she was recognized as the 2005 Outstanding Administrator.

Elijah Anderson is the Charles and William L. Day Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences and Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert on the sociology of Black America, he has authored numerous award-winning books and articles for more than three decades. Dr. Anderson has served as a Visiting Professor at Swarthmore College, Yale University, and Princeton University. In addition, he won the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania and was named the Robin M. Williams, Jr. Distinguished Lecturer for 1999-2000. Dr. Anderson received a B.A. from Indiana University, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University, where he was a Ford Foundation Fellow.

Tammy L. Anderson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Delaware, where she has conducted research and published numerous articles on drug abuse, gender, race, stigma, and health for more than ten years. She currently is engaged in an ethnographic study of club culture, drugs, crime, and victimization and is in the process of writing two books on these topics. She is the Chairperson of the Section on Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco of the American Sociological Association and the past Chairperson of the Division on Drinking and Drugs of the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

Mary R. Atlas-Terry is a Social Services Program Specialist in the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) at the U.S. Department of Justice, where she develops and expands OVC's Services to Trafficking Victims Discretionary Grant Program. She provides grant monitoring and project oversight to several organizations that provide victims of trafficking with services that include case management, food, clothing, shelter, legal and immigration assistance, medical and dental care, and mental health treatment. Ms. Atlas-Terry also has worked with OVC contractors to develop technical assistance resources for OVC's trafficking grantees.

James Austin is President of the JFA Institute, a position he has held since 2003. Prior to that, he was Director of the Institute of Crime, Justice and Corrections at the George Washington University and Executive Vice President for the National Council on Crime and Delinquency. Dr. Austin has more than 30 years of experience in correctional planning and research and has led several large research and evaluation programs. He has authored numerous publications and has received various prestigious awards in the field of criminology. He is also a leading consultant for the National Institute of Corrections Jail Center. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California.

Mark C. Bach is a patrol Lieutenant in the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation Police Department on the edge of the Phoenix metropolitan area. Prior to his nine years there, he worked for the Tempe (AZ) Police Department for 20 years, where he retired as the Director of the Office of Management and Budget. In addition to his current duties, he consults for the National Crime Prevention Council. Mr. Bach received his B.P.A. from the University of Arizona and his M.A. in Justice Studies from Arizona State University.

Karen J. Bachar is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice. She is project manager for evaluations of two programs conducted by Standing Against Global Exploitation (SAGE): the First Offender Prostitution Program and the LIFESKILLS/Early Intervention Prostitution Program. She is also program manager for a project on commercial sexual exploitation of children in New York City that involves a population assessment of commercially sexually exploited children and a process evaluation of the collaboration that works to address this problem. Ms. Bachar is also co-manager of a project on drug-facilitated, incapacitated, and forcible rape; another on the prevalence, context, and reporting of drug-facilitated sexual assaults on university campuses; and a systems change analysis of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) programs.

Benjamin Bachrach is a Vice President at Intelligent Automation, Inc., in Maryland. He has been involved in a variety of projects, including the development of 3D-based systems for the automated comparison of firearms and tool marks evidence. At present, his main research projects are associated with the use of 3D images for developing automated tool-mark/firearms identification systems. These projects are being conducted in collaboration with NIJ, NIST, the FBI, BATF, and others. Dr. Bachrach received his Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering at Tel Aviv University, Israel, and his M.S. and Ph.D. at the University of Maryland at College Park.

Susan M. Ballou is the Program Manager for Forensic Science in the Office of Law Enforcement Standards at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Her professional experience includes forensic toxicology, drug analysis, serology, hairs, fibers, and DNA. Ms. Ballou is a Fellow with the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and is the past Chairperson of its Criminalistics Section. She is a member of, and a leader in, a number of prestigious national associations. Ms. Ballou has published articles in several journals and authored a book chapter. She holds a B.S. in Forensic Science and an M.S. in Biotechnology from Johns Hopkins University. She is certified with the American Board of Criminalistics.

Dick Bathrick is co-founder of Men Stopping Violence (MSV) and has been its Director of Programs since 2004. He brings more than three decades of experience in progressive social change to the work of violence prevention. As part of MSV's national training team, Mr. Bathrick has led trainings for a variety of organizations, including the National Council of Churches, the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps, the National Association of Secondary School Principals, and the American Orthopsychiatric Association. Mr. Bathrick also has led international training initiatives in the United Kingdom and Taiwan.

Katrina Baum is a Statistician at the Bureau of Justice Statistics, where she has researched identity theft, stalking and victimization, and offending among juveniles and young adults, since 2003. Over the last ten years, Dr. Baum's research also has included projects related to policing, firearms, and geographic information systems. She received her B.A. from the University of California-Santa Barbara, her M.S. from Northeastern University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Allen J. Beck is Chief of the Corrections Statistics Program at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) and has been a statistician there since 1985. Dr. Beck is responsible for overseeing the implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act. His previous work has included national studies of recidivism, estimation of the lifetime chances of going to State or Federal prison, analyses of trends in the U.S. probation and parole populations, and research related to rising incarceration rates. In addition to supervising the correctional surveys and censuses at BJS, Dr. Beck is involved in various special projects. He earned his Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Michigan.

Daniel B. Bibel is the Program Manager of the Crime Reporting Unit in the Commonwealth Fusion Center of the Massachusetts State Police. Mr. Bibel has been involved in the implementation of the National Incident-Based Reporting System in Massachusetts since 1986. Through his efforts, Massachusetts became the first State to include incident address data as part of the routine data set, which has permitted detailed incident mapping capability. Mr. Bibel has published and presented on such topics as police information systems, repeat victimization of locations, and quality of crime data.

Paul J. Biermann is a Materials and Process Engineer in the Technical Services Department of Johns Hopkins University. Mr. Biermann has more than 24 years of experience with the manufacture and characterization of composite fiber/resin systems, polymer molding and casting, rapid prototyping, and adhesive bonding. He manages the Improving Correctional Officer Safety: Reducing Inmate Weapons program of the National Institute of Justice and is a subsystem development team leader for the Defense Applied Research Projects Agency's Revolutionizing Prosthetics Program. He has published 30 papers and one book chapter, holds nine U.S. patents, and has seven U. S. patents pending. He received his B.S. in Materials Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1980.

Alfred Blumstein is a Professor and the former Dean of the Heinz School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. He has had extensive experience in criminal justice research and policy since serving as the Director of Science and Technology for the President's Crime Commission from 1966 to 1967. He was Chairperson of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency and served as a member of the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing. He was the President of the American Society of Criminology and received its Sutherland Award for research contributions. His research has covered many aspects of criminal justice, including crime trends, criminal careers, sentencing, prison populations, demographic trends, juvenile violence, and drug enforcement policy.

Bradford M. Bogue is an investigator, author, and expert in the field of probation case management. He has been the principal investigator for more than 50 program evaluations in community corrections, including two probation workload analyses and a multi-site probation process and outcome evaluation. He designed the Risk and Resiliency Check-up Assessment and other innovations for the field, including automated case plan applications and quality assurance systems. Mr. Bogue is a motivational interviewer and the lead author for a definitive book on case planning, The Probation and Parole Treatment Planner (Wiley, 2003). He also is the lead author for a National Institute of Corrections position paper, "Principles of Effective Interventions."

Charles W. Bostian is the Alumni Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech University, where he has been a faculty member since 1967. On leave during the 1989 calendar year, Dr. Bostian served as an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Congressional Fellow for U.S. Representative Don Ritter, where he worked on legislative issues related to the American electronics industry and economic competitiveness. Dr. Bostian is co-author of two widely used John Wiley textbooks, Solid State Radio Engineering and Satellite Communications. He holds a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. He also served in the U.S. Army.

Jonathan M. Bowman is the Senior Deputy Attorney General in the Crime Victims Services Section of the Ohio Attorney General's Office. Employed there since 1995, Mr. Bowman previously was a Deputy Attorney General in the Charitable Law Section, an Assistant Attorney General in the Health and Human Services Section, and an Assistant Attorney General in the Crime Victims Services Section. Mr. Bowman received his J.D. from The Ohio State University College of Law in 1994.

Jessica Braider is a National Training and Research Coordinator for the National Sexual Assault Online Hotline. She is responsible for the development and implementation of its volunteer training program and researches and writes articles for the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN) Resource Library. Ms. Braider has worked on women's and youth empowerment issues for several years. She received her M.S.W. from the University of Michigan, where she focused on adolescent development and the treatment of sexual trauma.

William J. Bratton is Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) and the only person ever to serve as chief executive of both the LAPD and the New York Police Department. He also was the Chief of the New York City Transit Police, the Boston Police Commissioner, and the New York City Police Commissioner. Chief Bratton also has worked in the private sector, forming the Bratton Group, LLC, and consulting with Kroll Associates. He is President of the Police Executive Research Forum and was a Senior Executive Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. A frequent lecturer, writer, and commentator, his critically acclaimed autobiography, Turnaround, was published by Random House in 1998. He holds numerous honors and awards. He received a B.S. in Law Enforcement from the University of Massachusetts and is a graduate of the FBI National Executive Institute.

Robin Breckenridge has been in recovery since 1999. She went from being a homeowner and a nurse to a life of addiction, criminality, and homelessness. After being released from prison, she returned to a life of drugs, which lead her back to jail. Subsequently, she entered treatment and moved into an Oxford House recovery home, where she once again learned to live a life without drugs and crime. She became a Recovery Mentor at Oxford House and later became the Lead Outreach Coordinator for the Recovery Homes Program of the Recovery Association Project.

Paul S. Brennan is a Supervisory Probation and Parole Officer for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency in the District of Columbia and is in charge of the Sex Offender Unit, Sex Offender Registry, and Electronic Monitoring Program. He has extensive training in the areas of sex offender management, sex offender treatment, interviewing and interrogation techniques, computer forensics, domestic violence, and mental health. Mr. Brennan is member of the FBI's Joint Cyber Task Force and has been awarded the Certificate of Appreciation for Meritorious Service by the U.S. Department of Justice. Mr. Brennan earned his B.A. in Psychology from Xavier University in Ohio in 1991 and currently is pursuing his M.P.A. at American University.

Devon D. Brewer is Director of Interdisciplinary Scientific Research and an Affiliate Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology at the University of Washington. His research includes social networks, infectious disease, drug abuse, sexual behavior, violence, memory and cognition, evolutionary psychology, and research methods and statistics. He was the principal investigator of a research project entitled Clients of Prostitute Women: Deterrence, Prevalence, Characteristics, and Violence.

Laurie C. Bright is a Senior Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice, where she manages the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. Prior to joining NIJ in 1993, Ms. Bright conducted research and evaluations for the U.S. General Accounting Office, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and George Mason University. In addition to prisoner reintegration, Ms. Bright's work includes investigations of faith-based programs for correctional populations, drug treatment for prisoners, drug abuse prevention strategies, and victims' reactions to various types of crime. She received her B.A. in Social Work and her M.A. in Applied Sociological Research from George Mason University.

Katharine Browning is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice. Her previous positions include Social Science Program Specialist at the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Evaluation Specialist in the Research Center of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services, and Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of North Florida. Dr. Browning received a B.A. in Psychology from Clemson University in 1987, an M.S. in Administration of Justice from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1992, and a Ph.D. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Maryland in 1998.

Andy Bucholz is a board member of G2Tactics, a mobile license plate recognition company. His work at G2Tactics has helped the American law enforcement community to make reading license plates into an accepted and valued tool for fighting crime. Mr. Bucholz is a former police officer, the author of the book, Police Equipment, and the inventor of several patents in license plate recognition. He is a graduate of the Citadel.

Shawn D. Bushway is an Associate Professor of Criminology in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. He will be joining the faculty of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Albany in September 2006. His research focuses on the process of desistance, the impact of a criminal history on subsequent outcomes, and the distribution of discretion in the criminal justice sentencing process. He received his Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis and Political Economy from the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University in 1996.

John M. Butler is a research chemist who leads the Human Identity Project Team within the DNA Technologies Group and Biotechnology Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. His work focuses on developing future technologies for forensic DNA typing. In July 2002, in a White House ceremony, he received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President George W. Bush. He is also the recipient of the bi-annual Scientific Prize of the International Society of Forensic Genetics, the only American honored thus far. He has written more than 80 articles and book chapters and authored Forensic DNA Typing: Biology, Technology, and Genetics of STR Markers.

Jacquelyn C. Campbell is the Anna D. Wolf Endowed Professor and Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs in the School of Nursing at Johns Hopkins University. For almost three decades, Dr. Campbell has been conducting advocacy policy work and research in the area of domestic violence. She has been the principal investigator of ten major research grants and has published more than 145 articles and seven books on the subject. Her risk assessment instrument, the Danger Assessment, is widely used in domestic violence advocacy programs. She is, and has been, a member of a number of prestigious committees and boards, and she has received several awards and appointments. She earned her B.S.N. from Duke University, her M.S.N. from Wright State University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Rochester.

Mark Caplan is Chief of the Technology Assistance Division at the National Institute of Justice. He directs the Standards Program and the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC) System, a national system of ten centers dedicated to providing technology assistance to the criminal justice community throughout the nation. Prior to joining NIJ, Mr. Caplan served as Director of the NLECTC National Center in Rockville, Maryland. He graduated from the University of Maryland in 1979.

Peter L. Carnes is the Chief of Police in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, where he has instituted a number of successful community policing strategies. The former Chief of Police in Wenham, Massachusetts, he is the past President of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association and is active within the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Chief Carnes is an adjunct faculty member at two colleges and a frequent lecturer on the topic of community policing and police leadership. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, the Rotary International, and the Yarmouth Area Chamber of Commerce have all recognized him for his commitment to public service.

Patricia L. Caruso is Director of the Michigan Department of Corrections. Since 1988, she has held several positions there, including Business Manager, Warden, Regional Prison Administrator, and Deputy Director. Ms. Caruso is a member of the American Correctional Association Standards Committee and the past President of the North American Association of Wardens and Superintendents. She received a B.A. in Political Science and Sociology from Lake Superior State University and an M.A. in Comprehensive Occupational Education from the University of Michigan.

Ted Chan is Medical Director of the Emergency Departments at the University of California-San Diego. He is board certified in emergency medicine and is active in health policy initiatives and in working with community health and law enforcement agencies. His research includes emergency department crowding and efficiency, and informatics, tactical disaster, and pre-hospital medicine. Dr. Chan has authored and edited three textbooks: Atlas of Emergency Procedures, ECG in Emergency Medicine, and Acute Care and Sudden Deaths in Custody.

Janet Chiancone is the Research Coordinator at the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). She coordinates juvenile justice research activities within OJJDP and with other Federal agencies, and helps to translate research into policy and practice. Previously, she was a Program Manager in the Research Division at OJJDP, a researcher in the Center on Children and the Law at the American Bar Association, a program manager for a local court-appointed special advocate program, and a project manager for a research project on the impact of Head Start programs. Ms. Chiancone received a B.A. in Government and Politics and an M.S. in Family and Community Development from the University of Maryland.

Robert L. Chico is the Program Manager for AmberView. He has more than 25 years of experience in managing and directing diverse, high profile, national programs.

Ko-lin Chin is a Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University-Newark. Dr. Chin is the author of Chinese Subculture and Criminality: Non-traditional Crime Groups in America (Greenwood Press, 1990), Chinatown Gangs: Extortion, Enterprise & Ethnicity (Oxford University Press, 1996), Smuggled Chinese: Clandestine Immigration to the United States (Temple University Press, 1999), Heijin: Organized Crime, Business and Politics in Taiwan (M.E. Sharpe, 2003), and co-editor of the Handbook of Organized Crime in the United States (Greenwood Press, 1994). Currently, he is writing a book about the drug trade in the Wa area of the Golden Triangle and conducting a study on cross-border drug trafficking along the China-Burma border. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania.

Michelle Chino is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health and the Director of the Center for Health Disparities Research at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. She has more than ten years of experience in researching health and social justice issues in the American Indian community. Her research focuses on the integration of health and justice paradigms. Dr. Chino has a background in violence prevention, delinquency prevention, and substance abuse prevention.

Patrick M. Clark has been involved with juvenile and criminal justice issues since 1978. He has conducted research on prevention of violent behavior, delinquent behavior in relation to learning skills and handicaps, sentencing disparity, needs assessment and classification, management of offender populations, and other topics. He also has directed research involving evaluation of intensive probation, juvenile diversion and detention, sentencing guidelines, offender classification, case planning and management, prison overcrowding and prison violence, and reintegration of released prisoners. His current responsibilities involve evaluation research with the National Institute of Justice. He received a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Michigan, an M.A. in Experimental Psychology from California State University, and a Ph.D. in Psychology from Michigan State University.

Ronald V. Clarke is a Professor of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University and is an expert on situational crime prevention. Dr. Clarke has been a consultant to the United Nations, Europol, the European Union, and various policing institutes around the world. His publications include The Reasoning Criminal (Springer-Verlag, 1986), Situational Crime Prevention: Successful Case Studies (Harrow and Heston, 1997) and Crime Analysis for Problem Solvers (U.S. Department of Justice, 2005). With Graeme Newman, he recently co-authored Outsmarting the Terrorists (Praeger, in press), a book on the application of situational prevention techniques in the field of terrorism. He is also Vice President of the Center for Problem–Oriented Policing.

Heather J. Clawson is an expert in human trafficking, victim services, criminal justice, juvenile justice, and youth development. She has more than ten years of experience designing, conducting, and managing program and training evaluations; providing evaluation training and technical assistance; and using state-of-the-art statistical techniques. Dr. Clawson has developed and managed large databases; led survey and interview data collection efforts; and written technical reports, mostly for the U.S. Department of Justice and various not-for-profit organizations.

Terry Coonan is founder of the Center for the Advancement of Human Rights at Florida State University (FSU), which focuses on human trafficking issues and litigates pro bono cases on behalf of trafficking victims. A consultant on human trafficking issues with law enforcement officials and human rights groups in the U.S., Russia, Thailand, and Kazakhstan and widely published, he was the lead investigator on FSU's Human Trafficking Research Project. Most recently, Professor Coonan designed the teaching curriculum for the U.S. Department of Justice on human trafficking. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Notre Dame and his law degree from the University of Cincinnati.

Steven E. Correll is Executive Director of Nlets – The International Justice and Public Safety Information Sharing Network. Prior to his four years there, he worked for the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Mr. Correll is a member of the Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative Advisory Council, the Global Executive Steering Committee, and the Global Privacy and Data Quality Working Group. He has been the Chairperson for the Global Security Working Group, the Global Outreach Committee, and the Global Infrastructure and Standards Working Group.

Michael A. Corriero is a Judge in the Youth Part of the Manhattan Supreme Court, where he adjudicates the cases of children as young as 13 who are charged as adults. He is the author of the book, Judging Children as Children: A Proposal for a Juvenile Justice System, to be published by Temple University Press in September 2006. He has delivered presentations throughout the United States and abroad on juvenile justice issues. He is also the recipient of numerous honors for his dedication to juvenile justice, including the Livingston Hall Juvenile Justice Award of the American Bar Association.

Peter J. Costianes is the Lead Coordinating Technologist for the National Institute of Justice's Concealed Weapons Detection Technical Panel under the Systems and Surveillance Technical Working Group. He has performed research and managed programs in geometrical, physical, and coherent optics; image processing; image compression; and image understanding. He has directed programs in optical data storage systems and in storage and retrieval using optical techniques, including holography. He also has provided technical support to the Air Force Research Laboratory IFTC on the Quantum Information Science and Technology Program at the Defense Applied Research Project Agency and has initiated an in-house effort to look at applications of quantum information and computing to database storage and retrieval.

Christine R. Crossland is a Senior Social Science Analyst with the National Institute of Justice. Working in the Office of Research and Evaluation, she is responsible for planning, implementing, testing, evaluating, managing, and reporting on criminal justice grants, contracts, and studies. She currently is working with other government agencies, non-profit organizations, private businesses, and criminal justice and public health agencies to coordinate the establishment of a broad and enhanced research agenda in the areas of drugs and crime, violence and victimization, and American Indian/Alaska Native tribal justice.

Scott H. Decker is a Professor and the Chairperson of the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Arizona State University. His research focuses on gangs, juvenile justice, criminal justice policy, and the offender's perspective. He is a research partner for Project Safe Neighborhoods in the Eastern District of Missouri and the Southern District of Illinois. Dr. Decker's books include Life in the Gang (Cambridge), Confronting Gangs (Roxbury), Policing Gangs and Youth Violence (Wadsworth), and European Street Gangs and Troublesome Youth Groups (Alta Mira Press, 2005). He received his B.A. in Social Justice from DePauw University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Criminology from Florida State University.

Jonathan A. Dudek is a psychologist and a consultant in Maine and New Hampshire. His practice focuses on forensic psychology with an expertise in the assessment of violent behavior. In addition to conducting forensic evaluations and testifying as an expert witness, Dr. Dudek consults on issues that include criminal investigations and litigation, violence risk and threat assessment, risk management and related policy development, and workplace violence concerns. He completed his dissertation research, examining homicides among prostitutes, at the FBI's National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime.

Joshua A. Ederheimer is Director of the Police Executive Research Forum's Center on Force and Accountability (CFA). He joined PERF in January 2004 after a career with the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia. The founding Director of the CFA, he has published extensively on numerous issues of importance to policing. As a member of the Metropolitan Police Department, he attained the rank of Inspector and was Director of the Civil Rights and Force Investigations Division. He also is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Public Affairs in the Department of Law, Justice, and Society at American University. Mr. Ederheimer has a B.A. from American University and an M.A in Management and Leadership from Johns Hopkins University.

Louis "Ike" Eichenlaub began his position as Warden of the Federal Correctional Institution in Milan, Michigan, in July 2006. Before that, he served as Chief of the Office of Security Technology with the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Washington, DC. Earlier positions have included Associate Warden of the Federal Medical Center in Lexington, Kentucky; Executive Assistant of the Federal Medical Center in Rochester, Minnesota; and various case management and unit management positions at other federal corrections facilities. Mr. Eichenlaub received a Federal Bureau of Prisons media relations award in 1999. He received his Master's degree from the University of Maryland in 1990.

David Ensley is Chief of Research and Data Analysis for the Florida Department of Corrections, where he and his staff provide information to upper management, the Florida legislature, and the public about inmates and offenders supervised in the community. Mr. Ensley's research includes recidivism analysis, inmate disruption, and forecasting methods. His recent projects include the design and implementation of a random control study of substance abuse programs in prison and the creation of measures of facility-level disruption. He has worked as researcher for the State of Florida for 12 years and has an M.S. in Statistics from Florida State University.

Michael Epstein is a Senior Program Manager at the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center – West and is responsible for corrections technologies and information technology systems and services. Mr. Epstein has more than 35 years of experience working on high technology systems with specific expertise in the definition, acquisition, and integration of complex technology systems. He has worked continuously on the application of computer systems since 1961. He has a B.S. and an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the City University of New York.

Henry A. Erlich is a molecular biologist, geneticist, and immunologist. He is Vice President of Discovery Research and Director of the Human Genetics Department at Roche Molecular Systems and is on the faculty at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute. He is engaged in the development and application of Polymerase Chain Reaction in basic research, medical diagnostics, evolution and anthropology, and forensics. His main focus has been in the analysis of polymorphism in the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes and the development of HLA typing tests for tissue typing, disease susceptibility, individual identification, and the genetics of complex disease. Dr. Erlich has authored more than 260 articles and is the recipient of various scientific awards. He received his Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of Washington. He was a post-Doctoral Fellow at Princeton and Stanford Universities.

Amanda Fanniff is a doctoral student at the University of Arizona, studying clinical psychology, policy, and law under the mentorship of Dr. Judith Becker. Her research interests include the assessment and treatment of juvenile sex offenders and competence to stand trial among juvenile defendants. She is interested in both child and adolescent development.

Christine Feller is Supervisor of the Child Victim Identification Program (CVIP) at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC). This program allows the NCMEC to locate and identify unknown child victims featured in sexually abusive images as an aid to law enforcement agencies and prosecution teams across the country. In the last year, CVIP has been involved in the successful identification of more than 30 previously unidentified child victims. Ms. Feller received a B.A. in Economics from Saint Mary's College and an M.A. in Criminal Justice from the George Washington University.

Thomas E. Feucht is Assistant Director for Research and Evaluation at the National Institute of Justice, where he has directed, conducted, and published research in the areas of substance abuse, intravenous drug use and HIV, prostitution, prison drug use, and school violence. Dr. Feucht also serves on the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Subcommittee of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Committee. Before joining NIJ in 1994, he was on the faculty at Cleveland State University. Dr. Feucht received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 1986.

Michael Finigan is founder of Northwest Professional Consortium, Inc., a nationally recognized research and evaluation firm, and has been involved in research and evaluation in the criminal justice arena since 1986. His work has focused on substance abuse treatment and prevention for adolescents and adults, particularly in criminal justice settings. He currently is the principal investigator on cost benefit evaluations of drug courts in California, Maryland, Michigan, and Indiana. He also was the co-principal investigator on a national evaluation of family treatment drug courts. Dr. Finigan earned his Ph.D. in Sociology in 1979.

David Finkelhor is Director of the Crimes against Children Research Center, the co-Director of the Family Research Laboratory, and a Professor of Sociology at the University of New Hampshire. He is known for his work on the problems of child sexual abuse, child homicide, missing and abducted children, children exposed to domestic and peer violence, and other forms of family violence. He has edited and authored 11 books and more than 150 journal articles and book chapters. In 1994, he was given the Distinguished Child Abuse Professional Award by the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, and in 2004, he received the Significant Achievement Award from the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

John R. Firman is Director of the Research Center at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP). He oversees major policy and research initiatives of the IACP on all aspects of policing and is responsible for directing IACP's annual national policy summits. Prior to joining the IACP in 1994, he was the Associate Director of the Illinois Criminal Justice Authority. He received the J. Paul Sylvestre Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in the Field of Criminal Justice Research from the U.S. Department of Justice. Mr. Firman received a B.S. in Sociology and Criminal Justice from LaSalle University in 1971 and an M.A. in Sociology and Criminal Justice from Temple University in 1979.

Jocelyn Fontaine is a Research Assistant in the Violence and Victimization Research Division at the National Institute of Justice. Over the past two years, her research has focused on maternal homicide, female criminality, procedural justice, and violence against women. She received her M.S. from American University in 2005 and is currently a Ph.D. candidate there in the Department of Justice, Law,and Society.

Julian Ford is a clinical psychologist and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut's Health Center. He developed the Trauma Affect Regulation: Guidelines for Education and Therapy (TARGET) program for youth and adults with co-occurring psychiatric and addictive disorders and complex post-traumatic stress disorder. Dr. Ford is Director of the University of Connecticut Division of the Center for Children Exposed to Violence; and Director of the Center for Trauma Response, Recovery, and Preparedness (for communities affected by mass trauma).

William A. Ford is a Visiting Scientist Program Manager for Information Led Policing (ILP) at the National Institute of Justice. His duties include overseeing ILP's budget and contracts and representing NIJ as the point of contact for ILP grantee principal investigators. Mr. Ford is a C4ISR Engineer with the U.S. Navy Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Charleston and continues to contribute his business and technical skills there.

Paul C. Friday is a Professor in, and the former Chairperson of, the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. He has published more than 70 articles and four books on crime, delinquency, comparative criminology, victimology, and social policy. In 2004, he completed a birth cohort study in China and received the Outstanding Contribution in International Scholarly Exchange from the China Society of Juvenile Delinquency. He currently is an Executive Board Member and the Treasurer of the World Society of Victimology and a member of the Executive Committee of the International Division of the American Society of Criminology.

Gerald Gaes is a Visiting Scientist at the National Institute of Justice and the former Director of Research for the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Dr. Gaes has published articles in professional journals and book chapters and is the first author of Prison Performance Measurement: Government Privatization and Accountability. He recently published articles in Crime and Delinquency, Justice Quarterly, and Crime and Public Policy. His current interests include prisoner research ethics, cost-benefit analysis of criminal justice interventions, spatial econometrics of crime, local versus dispositional influences on criminal trajectories, and evaluation methodology.

Michelle M. Garcia is the Senior Program Associate for the Stalking Resource Center at the National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC). Prior to joining NCVC in April 2006, Ms. Garcia was a Program Specialist in the Office for Victims of Crime at the U.S. Department of Justice. She has more than ten years of experience working with victims of sexual assault and domestic violence and advocating for victims' rights. She has trained nationally on various topics, including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and dismantling oppression. Ms. Garcia received her M.P.P. from the University of Chicago.

Nicole D. Gaskin-Laniyan is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). Dr. Gaskin-Laniyan manages research grants and evaluations of demonstration projects in the areas of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and commercial exploitation of children. Before joining NIJ, she was a Victim/Witness Program Specialist in the U.S. Attorney's Office in Washington, D.C., where she assisted victims/witnesses through the criminal justice system. She has a B.A. in Law and Society from the State University of New York-Binghamton, an M.S.W from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in Social Work from Howard University.

Robin E. Gibson is the Manager for the Court Automation, Fiscal, and Planning Department, Missouri Office of State Court Administrators. A member of standards working groups at the National Center for State Courts and OASIS, Ms. Gibson is the designated court representative to the XML Structure Task Force, a working group of the Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative at the U.S. Department of Justice. She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Tennessee. Additionally, she is a Certified Project Management Professional.

Andrew L. Goldberg is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice and serves as a corrections expert in the areas of prison sexual violence and probation and parole. He also is responsible for overseeing research projects on corrections and management, mental health in corrections, and geographic information systems in corrections. From 1995 to 1999, Mr. Goldberg worked for the Bureau of Justice Statistics, where he collected and analyzed law enforcement data. He holds a B.A. in Political Science from Drew University and an M.A. in Criminal Justice from the State University of New York-Albany.

Richard Goldberg is Chief of the Financial Institution Fraud and Identity Theft Section of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He is a specially-trained computer hacking and intellectual property prosecutor, does counter-terrorism work, and previously supervised the Narcotics and Major Crimes Sections of that office. Earlier, he was a Deputy District Attorney, leading the Investigations Division in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. He received the Director's Award for Superior Performance from the U.S. Department of Justice and citations from various agencies. He is a graduate of Brown University and Georgetown University Law School.

Edward W. Gondolf is Research Director for the Mid-Atlantic Addiction Training Institute and a Professor of Sociology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He conducts grant-funded research on the response of the courts, mental health practitioners, alcohol treatment clinicians, and batterer treatment programs to domestic violence and was the principal investigator for a multi-site study of batterer intervention that included a four-year follow-up of 856 batterers and their female partners. Dr. Gondolf has authored numerous articles and books on domestic violence intervention, including Assessing Women Battering in Mental Health Services and Batterer Intervention Systems: Issues, Outcomes and Recommendations.

Julia G. Gorey is Prisoner Research Coordinator in the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She assesses compliance with Federal regulations by reviewing all incoming subpart C certification requests for research involving prisoners. Prior to joining OHRP, Ms. Gorey worked at the National Institutes of Health as a nuclear medicine technologist, a radiation safety officer, and a laboratory manager. Ms. Gorey earned her B.A and M.A. from the University of Virginia and her J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law.

Jack R. Greene is a Professor of Criminal Justice and Dean of the College of Criminal Justice (CCJ) at Northeastern University. Prior to becoming the CCJ Dean, he was Director of the Center for Public Policy at Temple University. Dr. Greene is the author of numerous publications, including Police Integrity (Wadsworth, 2004); Police Administration (McGraw-Hill, 1997); Community Policing, Rhetoric and Reality (Praeger, 1988); and Managing Police Work (Sage, 1984). He is also editor of The Encyclopedia of Policing (Routledge). Dr. Greene is a Commissioner on the Commission for the Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies and a member of the Joint Council on Information Age Crime. He received his M.S. and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University. He also is a graduate of the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University

Robert Griffiths is a retired police commander who has extensive investigative and forensic experience. A member of the Major Crimes Response Team, his field experience was largely in Alaska, where he faced many challenges. He was the manager of the Anchorage Emergency Communications Center, where he directed the Traffic and Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Programs. Mr. Griffiths holds a B.S. in Criminology from Southern Oregon University and an M.S. in Business Management from the University of LaVerne. He also is a graduate of Northwestern University's School of Police Staff and Command.

Corey B. Grogan is a Police Officer with the Atlanta Police Department. On October 8, 2005, he was part of a team serving an arrest warrant when the suspect fired shots at the team. As Officer Grogan reached to pull a fellow officer out of the line of fire, he was hit twice in the upper torso with bullets from the suspect's .45-caliber pistol. Both rounds were stopped by Officer Grogan's soft body armor. On March 7, 2006, he was inducted into the International Association of Chiefs of Police/DuPont Kevlar Survivors' Club as the 3,000th documented "save" from soft body armor.

Sydney Hanlon is the First Justice of the Dorchester Division of the Boston Municipal Court and has served in that capacity for 12 years. Before that, she served as an Associate Justice and was Chairperson of the Massachusetts District Court Domestic Violence Committee from 1992 until 2003, when the Dorchester District Court became part of the Boston Municipal Court. She is a member of the Massachusetts Trial Court Racial and Ethnic Fairness Advisory Board. Judge Hanlon sits regularly in the Dorchester Court Domestic Violence and Adult Criminal Sessions. Before becoming a judge, she was a prosecutor for 15 years. She received a B.A. from Brown University in 1972 and a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1975.

Tio Hardiman is working with Dr. Gary Slutkin at the Chicago Project for Violence Prevention, which focuses on reducing the homicide rate in Chicago. Mr. Hardiman grew up in Chicago's Henry Horner Projects and the Avalon Park community. In 1995, he established X-Man Productions, a non-profit organization that provides positive entertainment for those in the Chicagoland area, producing comedy shows, stage plays, concerts, and workshops. During that same year, he also started working for the Chicago Alliance for Neighborhood Safety, where he organized more than 50 block clubs and facilitated problem-solving sessions for crime-ridden communities. He attended Hirsch High School and received his B.A. and M.A. from Northeastern University.

Adele Harrell is Founding Director of the Justice Policy Center and has been studying drug abuse since 1975. Dr. Harrell currently is co-directing the evaluation of a three-site demonstration project to provide enhanced judicial oversight of domestic violence cases. Her earlier work with the justice system's response to domestic violence includes evaluation of the Violence Against Women Act's STOP Block Grant Program; a quasi-experimental evaluation of the impact of court-ordered treatment for domestic violence offenders, an assessment of court-related practices in restraining orders for domestic violence victims, an evaluation of the Bureau of Justice Assistance's eight-site Family Violence Demonstration Programs. and an evaluation of the police training provided under the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act.

Stan Harris is the First Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Mississippi and also the Anti-Terrorism Coordinator, Crisis Management Coordinator, Weed and Seed Coordinator, and Ethics Advisor. He is the recipient of the U.S. Attorney's Award for Distinguished Service. Previously, Mr. Harris was the Chief Counsel and Deputy Chief of Staff to Senator Trent Lott. An Army National Guard Lieutenant Colonel, he is the Staff Judge Advocate for the 184th Transportation Command Element. He has received several prestigious decorations from the U.S. Army. He earned his undergraduate degree from William Carey College in 1982 and his J.D. from the University of Mississippi in 1985.

John Hartner is Director of the Community Corrections Department in Washington County, Oregon, where he emphasizes treatment, clean and sober housing, transition programs, and peer support. His department oversees adult probation and parole, operates a 215-bed transition facility, and collaborates with more than 35 treatment providers. Previously, he was a probation officer, the director of a halfway house, and the Assistant Director of Operations for the county jail system in St. Louis.

Joseph F. Heaps is a Program Manager at the National Institute of Justice. Previously he was Vice President of Business Development at AstroVision International, a commercial satellite company. He also was a Senior Policy Analyst at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), where he advised three FCC Chairpersons and served as a U.S. delegate to the World Radio-Communication Conferences in Istanbul and Geneva. Prior to the FCC, Mr. Heaps worked at T. Rowe Price and served on active duty in the U.S. Navy. He is a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Mr. Heaps holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Villanova University and an M.B.A. from the University of Virginia.

Carol Henderson has more than 30 years of experience in scientific evidence and law. She has presented more than 180 lectures and workshops to forensic scientists, attorneys, judges, and law enforcement personnel. She also has written three books and more than 45 articles and book chapters on scientific evidence and courtroom testimony. She is an editor of the Encyclopedia of Forensic and Legal Medicine (2005) and serves on numerous editorial boards, working groups, and advisory councils. She is Secretary of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and Director of the National Clearinghouse for Science, Technology, and the Law.

John Hihn is a Program Manager at the National Institute of Justice. He manages the General Forensics Research and Development Program, whose purpose is to serve as the national focal point for research and development of new tools and technologies to support the criminal justice system at the Federal, State, and local levels. Prior to joining NIJ, Mr. Hihn conducted research and development for U.S. Customs and Border Protection. He received his B.S. in Physical Science from York College of Pennsylvania.

Jennifer Pollitt Hill is Executive Director of the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault. With more than ten years of experience as a social worker addressing violence against women, she has provided a variety of direct services including individual and group counseling to adult and teen survivors of sexual assault; community outreach and education; and professional training and technical assistance. Since 1998, she has focused on non-profit administration, utilizing her expertise in program design and management.

Mark Hirsh is employed by MITRE and has been supporting the Defense Cyber Crime Institute (DCCI) for the last six of his 22 years there. He has been instrumental in designing and creating the DCCI stego library, and has led the effort to use this library to evaluate and compare the capabilities of different steganalysis programs. Before coming to DCCI, Mr. Hirsh supported the Intelligence Information System Community at the Department of Defense and spent 16 years at the National Security Agency (NSA), providing system design and software development support to NSA time-sensitive operations centers.

Martin F. Horn is the Commissioner of both the New York City Departments of Corrections and Probation. In Pennsylvania, he served as Secretary of Administration and was Chairperson of the Tobacco Settlement Investment Board. He also served as Chairperson of both the Pennsylvania Employees' Benefit Trust Fund and the Justice Network Council, as a Board Member of the Public School Employees' Retirement System, and as Pennsylvania's Secretary of Corrections. Mr. Horn is the 2005 recipient of the Michael Francke Award from the Association of State Correctional Administrators. He holds a B.A. in Government from Franklin and Marshall College and an M.A. in Criminal Justice from John Jay College.

Norma Hotaling is founder and Executive Director of SAGE Project, Inc., in San Francisco. She has more than 15 years of professional experience in the areas of violence and commercial sexual exploitation; domestic and international trafficking; drug abuse, trauma, and mental health issues of women and girls; and the demand side of prostitution. SAGE has received several awards, including Innovations in American Government, the Peter F. Drucker Award, and the Oprah's Angel Award. Ms. Hotaling's publications include SAGE Peer Counselor Education Workshop on Trauma and Peer Counselor Skills and Power, Control and Violence as Central Themes among Customers of Prostituted Women.

David Huizinga is a Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado. For three decades, he has conducted research on developmental life-span issues. He is the co-author of four books and numerous book chapters, journal articles, and government reports on issues surrounding delinquency, drug use, victimization, and mental health. Dr. Huizinga is the principal investigator of the Denver Youth Survey, of the National Youth Survey, and of a cross-national project on justice system processing. He holds graduate degrees in mathematics and psychology.

Iara C. Infosino is an Operations Research Analyst at the National Institute of Justice. As the program manager for the Modeling and Simulation Portfolio, she is responsible for defining and developing new and improved technologies to increase the efficacy of operations and training in the criminal justice system. Previously, Dr. Infosino worked for more than 12 years developing decision models/algorithms and custom software used in supply chain management and transportation/logistic support systems. Dr. Infosino earned a B.S. in Mathematics and an M.S. in Applied Mathematics in Brazil and a Ph.D. in Operations Research from Stanford University.

Jeffrey Isherwood is the Principal Security Engineer for the CyberScience Laboratory (CSL) at Dolphin Technology, Inc., which supports the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center's Northeast Region. He has been researching, teaching, and analyzing cyber crime of all types with the CSL for more than three years. His specialties include user security awareness training; Linux/Unix systems; hackers and their culture; network intrusion detection; incident response; wireless networks; phishing and online fraud; and Internet safety for parents, teachers and children. Before joining the CSL, Mr. Isherwood was on active duty as a radio communications specialist with the U.S. Air Force and as an information assurance engineer with the Air Force Research Laboratory.

Laura Ivkovich is a Social Science Program Specialist and the Web Content Manager with the Office for Victims of Crime in the Office of Justice Programs. Ms. Ivkovich also oversees education, training, and outreach projects within the Training and Information Dissemination Division; is the Chairperson of OJP's Working Group on Identity Theft; and is OJP's representative to the Federal Interagency Work Group on Identity Theft. Previously, she was a Program Specialist in OVC's Federal Assistance Division and managed OVC's training initiatives for Federal prosecutors and Victim/Witness Coordinators from U.S. Attorneys' Offices nationwide. She also was the Senior Legal Research Specialist, Assistant Director of Special Operations, and Director of the Attorney General's Victim/Witness Assistance Program at the Office of the Arizona Attorney General.

Ann L. Jacobs is Executive Director of the Women's Prison Association, which provides programs through which thousands of women acquire life skills needed to end their involvement in the criminal justice system. The association is expanding its public policy advocacy capacity through the creation of the Institute on Women and Criminal Justice. Ms. Jacobs' experience includes a range of assignments in government, non-profit organizations, and the private sector. Her public sector work includes juvenile and adult justice, health, education, and social welfare systems.

John P. Jarvis is a Senior Behavioral Scientist in the Behavioral Science Unit at the FBI. His work focuses on crime analysis, crime trend research, and the initiation and support of various research efforts by Federal, State, and local law enforcement. His recent work involves examining the validity and reliability of national crime statistics, analyzing serial crimes, and measuring and exploring the behavior of extremists and computer criminals. His publications have appeared in the Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice; Homicide Studies; and the Journal of Trauma, Violence and Abuse.

Raymond T. Johnson is a retired Police Officer of the Seattle Police Department. On December 23, 1975, he was shot multiple times while thwarting an armed robbery at a Seattle food market. He survived with severe hand injuries and two deep chest bruises. He was the first documented "save" from a new generation of body armor being field tested by the National Institute of Justice.

Rhonda M. Jones is Chief of Planning and Management for the National Institute of Justice, where she coordinates with and supports the Acting NIJ Director in the areas of strategic planning, policy, management, and administration. Ms. Jones received her M.P.P. and her J.D. from the College of William and Mary.

Monica Kaiser is a Lieutenant with the San Diego Police Department and commands the Domestic Violence and Elder Abuse Units. She has been with the department for 26 years. As a Sergeant, she worked in the Domestic Violence Unit and was instrumental in developing the San Diego Family Justice Center and the Domestic Violence Communications System (DVCS). The DVCS electronically links all members of the domestic violence community, delivering a high level of service to victims.

Brian C. Kelly is a medical anthropologist and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Purdue University. He collaborates with the Center for HIV Educational Studies and Training at the City University of New York and his research includes drug use, sexual health, and youth cultures. He currently is focusing on projects that include club drug use among young adults in New York City and drug dealing among suburban youth. Dr. Kelly received his undergraduate degree from Fordham University and his graduate degree from Columbia University.

Erin E. Kenneally is a Cyber Forensics Analyst at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and is the CEO of Elchemy, Inc., which conducts applied research and development solutions at the intersection of science, technology, law, and policy. In addition, she is an attorney who consults, researches, publishes, and speaks on prevailing and forthcoming issues at the crossroads of information technology and the law. She has lectured and helped coordinate training conferences for officers of the court, law enforcement, and industry professionals concerned with digital evidence and information forensics. Ms. Kenneally also holds leadership positions with several organizations, including the Global Privacy and Information Quality Working Group. In addition to her J.D., she has an M.S. in Forensic Sciences.

Pamela King has more than 15 years of experience in the field of digital forensics and is currently creating and managing a digital forensic laboratory for Legis Discovery, an electronic discovery firm. Earlier, she worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) as an examiner in the New Jersey Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory (NJRCFL) and for the Middle Atlantic Great Lakes Organized Crime Law Enforcement Network. Ms. King is a Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE) and holds many other certifications in digital forensics. She is involved in numerous professional organizations and is now serving her second term as Vice President for the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS).

Stephen P. Klein is a Senior Research Scientist at RAND, where he has led large-scale studies in the fields of criminal justice, health, military manpower, and education. His criminal justice research includes studies of stranger and acquaintance rape victims; racial equity issues in the processing and sentencing of defendants in capital and non-capital cases within and across jurisdictions; predicting recidivism; examining the effects of three-strikes laws; and assessing juror, witness, and defendant attitudes toward the criminal justice system. Dr. Klein has more than 250 publications, including articles on possible racial and ethnic bias in case processing and sentencing.

David A. Klinger is an Associate Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Prior to pursuing an academic career, he was a patrol officer with the Los Angeles and Redmond (Washington) Police Departments. Professor Klinger recently served on the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Police Policy and Practices and has written numerous scholarly works that address topics such as arrest practices, the use of force, and responses to terrorism. His book on police shootings, Voices From the Kill Zone: A Cop's Eye View of Deadly Force, was published by Jossey-Bass in 2004.

Christopher P. Krebs is a criminologist and the co-principal investigator for the National Prisoner Survey on Sexual Assault Pilot and National Studies at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. With extensive research experience in the areas of juvenile justice and delinquency, corrections, offender behavior, substance abuse, and program evaluation, he has led and worked on a number of proposals and projects for various Federal agencies. He has employed both quantitative and qualitative methods in his research and has extensive experience designing studies, developing survey instruments, analyzing data, and reporting findings.

Sarah Kuck is a Senior Analyst at Abt Associates Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is co-author with Dana Hunt of the 2006 NIJ report, "Methamphetamine Use: Lessons Learned," and co-author with Peter Finn of the 2005 report, "Stress Among Probation and Parole Officers and What Can Be Done About It." She is an M.A. candidate in Applied Sociology at the University of Massachusetts at Boston.

Gary LaFree is a Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice and the Director of the National Center for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism at the University of Maryland. Much of his recent research has dealt with national and international macro-level crime trends. Previously, he worked on a variety of projects related to the development and analysis of a new global terrorism database. These data are being used to examine global trends in terrorism, the development of terrorist hot spots, the sudden desistance of terrorism, and the effectiveness of counter-terrorist strategies. He is the President of the American Society of Criminology.

Robert J. LaLonde is a Professor at the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. Previously, he taught at the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago and the College of Business at Michigan State University. His research includes program evaluation, education and training, immigration policy, worker displacement, unions and collective bargaining, and the consequences of incarceration on former prisoners and their children. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1985.

Richard C. Larson is the Mitsui Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and in the Engineering Systems Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also is the founding Director of the Center for Engineering System Fundamentals. He has focused on operations research as applied to services industries, primarily in the fields of criminal justice, technology-enabled education, urban service systems, queuing, logistics, and workforce planning. He is the past President of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS); a member of the National Academy of Engineering; and a recipient of the INFORMS President's Award, Lanchester Prize, and Kimball Medal.

Pamela K. Lattimore is a Professor and Director of the Center for the Management of Risk Behavior at the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of South Carolina. Affiliated with the Research Triangle Institute, Dr. Lattimore has directed a number of research and evaluation projects and currently serves as co-principal investigator of the Multi-site Evaluation of the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. Her research focuses on the evaluation of interventions, investigation into the causes and correlates of criminal behavior, and development of approaches to improve criminal justice operations. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 1987.

Barry Latzer is a Senior Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a member of the Doctoral Faculty in Criminal Justice at City University of New York. In 2004-2005, he was a Research Fellow at the National Institute of Justice, where he served as principal investigator for a project on time consumption in death penalty appeals. Dr. Latzer's research focuses on capital punishment and constitutional criminal procedure, and he authored Death Penalty Cases: Leading U.S. Supreme Court Cases on Capital Punishment (Butterworth-Heinemann, 2002). He earned his J.D. from Fordham University in 1985 and his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts in 1977.

Ivy Lee is Director of the Immigration and Trafficking Project at Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach and has held that position since 2001. Her practice includes representation of victims of violence, legislative and policy advocacy, community outreach, and training and technical assistance. She authored "Human Trafficking from a Legal Advocate's Perspective," published in the Journal of International Law and Policy. Selected in 2004 as one of the top 40 attorneys under 40 by the California Daily Journal, she is a Commissioner on the San Francisco Immigrant Rights Commission. She received her J.D. from New York University School of Law in 1998.

Elizabeth J. Letourneau works at the Family Services Research Center at the Medical University of South Carolina, where she conducts research on treatment effectiveness with juvenile sex offenders and the impact of legal policies on sex offenders. Dr. Letourneau has conducted research on adult and juvenile sex offenders since 1989 and has numerous publications in this field. She is active in the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers and served on its Executive and Editorial Boards and Ethics and Research Committees over the past several years.

Deborah A. Levesque is Director of Health Behavior Change Programs for Pro-change Behavior Systems. Having trained with experts on the Transtheoretical Model of Change (TTM), she developed TTM expert system interventions to reduce recidivism among domestic violence offenders, prevent dating violence among teens, and halt depression among at-risk primary care patients. She also developed and validated a measure of resistance in domestic violence offenders and worked with researchers and clinicians to identify best practices for managing it. She earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Rhode Island.

Akiva M. Liberman is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice, where he focuses on delinquency and juvenile justice issues. Dr. Liberman also has conducted juvenile justice research at the Center for Violence Research and Prevention at Columbia University and at the Criminal Justice Agency of New York City. His research has focused on the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems' responses to serious delinquency. He holds a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from New York University.

Mark W. Lipsey is Director of the Center for Evaluation Research and Methodology at the Institute for Public Policy Studies at Vanderbilt University. His research has focused on risk, prevention, and intervention for juvenile delinquency and on issues of methodological quality in program evaluation. Dr. Lipsey co-authored Evaluation: A Systematic Approach; was Chairperson of a committee at the National Research Council that addressed ways to improve the evaluation of criminal justice programs; and has conducted, consulted on, reviewed, and written about program evaluation for more than three decades.

David Lisak is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts-Boston, where he conducts and supervises research on the causes and consequences of interpersonal violence. He has studied the motives and characteristics of undetected rapists (i.e., men who rape but are never prosecuted). Dr. Lisak serves on the faculty of the National Judicial Education Program and the American Prosecutors' Research Institute and is a consultant to judicial, prosecutorial, and law enforcement education programs as well as to universities and the U.S. military regarding sexual assault prevention and policies.

Rolf Loeber is a Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and of Psychology and Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh. He also is a Professor of Juvenile Delinquency and Social Development at the Free University in Amsterdam. Dr. Loeber is co-Director of the Life History Program and is the principal investigator for three longitudinal studies: the Pittsburgh Youth Study, the Developmental Trends Study, and the Pittsburgh Girls Study. He has published widely in the fields of juvenile antisocial behavior and delinquency, substance use, and mental health problems.

Paul A. Logli is the State's Attorney for Winnebago County (Rockford), Illinois, and has served in that capacity since 1986. Prior to that, he was an Assistant State's Attorney, a private practitioner, and an Associate Judge of the Circuit Court. Several Illinois Governors and Attorneys General have appointed him to numerous boards and commissions. He is a frequent lecturer for the National College of District Attorneys and numerous state prosecutor associations. He is the past President of the Illinois State's Attorneys' Association and is President of the National District Attorneys' Association and of the Winnebago County Bar Association.

Roderick H. MacDonald is Director of the Initiative for System Dynamics in the Public Sector at the College of Public Affairs and Policy at the University at Albany. He analyzes and addresses various issues including the delivery of mental health services, fleet maintenance, Social Security disability programs, supply chain management, DWI recidivism, traffic safety, management of large-scale construction projects, and issues relating to the criminal justice system. Dr. MacDonald founded MindWalk Consulting, where he administered a famine relief program in Botswana, developed low-income housing projects in New York State (NYS) and provided technical assistance on management issues to non-profit associations in NYS. He earned his Ph.D. in Public Administration and Policy at the University at Albany.

Gary D. MacLellan is a Presidential Management Fellow and Program Manager at the National Institute of Justice, where he studies offender tracking using global positioning systems, Radio Frequency Identification location of inmates in correctional settings, and reducing illicit cell phone use in prisons. Prior to his NIJ employment, Mr. MacLellan was a military policeman in the U.S. Army and U.S. Army Reserve. He also was a corrections officer in Arizona and a Deputy Sheriff in the Cochise County (Arizona) Sheriff's Office. Mr. MacLellan received both his B.S. and his M.S. in Chemistry from Northern Arizona University.

Lyle O. Malotky is Chief Scientific and Technical Advisor for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). He brings together requirements driven by terrorists' threats and capabilities, the operational concerns of the transportation industry, and the capabilities of the research community, to help develop and field transportation security technology. Before the establishment of TSA, he was the FAA Scientific Advisor for Civil Aviation Security. Dr. Malotky serves on numerous international and intergovernmental committees on the application of technology to the battle against terrorism. He has a bachelors degree in Chemistry, a Masters of Engineering Administration, and a Ph.D. in Polymer Science.

Michael D. Maltz is a Senior Research Scientist and Adjunct Professor of Sociology at the Criminal Justice Research Center at the Ohio State University. He is also a Professor Emeritus of Criminal Justice and of Information and Decision Sciences at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Dr. Maltz was Editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology and a Visiting Fellow at the Bureau of Justice Statistics, working on the development of graphical and geographical methods of analyzing data. Recently, he has been assessing and improving the quality of crime data and improving the methods used to analyze criminal justice data. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1963.

Christopher D. Maxwell is an Associate Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University and is an Associate Research Scientist in the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research at the University of Michigan, where he directs the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data. Dr. Maxwell's research includes testing for the benefits and costs of sanctions and therapeutic treatments for spousal abusers and the impacts of police and court services on victims of domestic violence. He has published several articles in journals including Criminology, Criminology and Public Police, Justice Quarterly, and the Journal of Quantitative Criminology. He earned B.A.s in Psychology, Sociology, and Criminal Justice from Indiana University-Bloomington and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Rutgers University.

Ronald W. McBride is a law enforcement consultant for a non-profit partnership of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Company. The purpose of the partnership—the IACP/Dupont Kevlar Survivors' Club—is to decrease the number of police officers disabled or killed in the line of duty. Retired after 35 years of municipal police service, Mr. McBride spent his last 20 years as Chief of Police in Ashland, Kentucky. During his service in Ashland, he also served as City Manager.

Scott McCallum is a Systems Analyst for the Facial Recognition Project in the Pinellas County (Florida) Sheriff's Office. He leads the implementation, enhancement, and maintenance of the systems project, which includes a mug shot booking system, web tools, investigation tools, a facial recognition watch list screening, street-level mobile identification units, and interfaces with law enforcement agencies for a data sharing initiative.

Charles A. McClelland, Jr. was promoted to Executive Assistant Chief of Police of the Houston Police Department (HPD) in May of 2004. Reporting directly to the Chief of Police, he is in charge of Administrative Operations, which includes the Internal Investigations Command, Office of the Inspector General, Professional Development Command, Crime Analysis Division, and Command Center. Executive Assistant Chief McClelland rose through the ranks during his 28-year law enforcement career, beginning as a patrol officer in September 1977. He has experienced virtually every aspect of law enforcement throughout his career with the HPD and has received numerous awards and commendations. He received a B. S. in Criminal Justice and an M. A. in Sociology from the University of Houston and is also a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) National Academy.

James Patrick McCreary is an Associate Deputy Director with the Policy Office of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, where he coordinates activities involving law enforcement and justice information sharing programs. He also is the Designated Federal Official for the Global Advisory Committee, an advisory board to the U.S. Attorney General and the Assistant Attorney General of the Office of Justice Programs. Mr. McCreary is a recipient of the Attorney General's Annual Award for Excellence in Information Technology and the Internet Technology Leadership Award from Government Computer News. He holds a B.S. and an M.S. in Criminology from Indiana State University.

Douglas McDonald is employed by Abt Associates Inc., where he has conducted numerous studies of sentencing policies and practices, including intermediate sanctions, correctional programs, comparisons of public and private services, health care, drug use and substance abuse treatment, disease surveillance systems, response planning for bio-terrorist attacks, and evaluations of homeland security programs. His recent work includes an evaluation of a privatization demonstration in the Federal prison system, an assessment of disease surveillance in prisons and jails, a comparison of federalized versus contractor-provided airline passenger screening, and a study of prisoner reentry services.

Edmund F. McGarrell is a Professor and Director of the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University (MSU) and is Co-Director (with Timothy Bynum) of MSU's Project Safe Neighborhoods initiative. His research focuses on communities and crime and includes an experiment on the use of restorative justice as an alternative response to juvenile crime and a strategic problem-solving initiative to reduce homicide and firearms violence. Recent reports include a series of Project Safe Neighborhoods case studies for the Office of Justice Programs. He is the author of Juvenile Correctional Reform, and is co-editor of Community Corrections and Community Policing in a Rural Setting. His recent articles have appeared in the International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice, Justice Quarterly, and Policing.

Patrick E. McKnight is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at George Mason University, where he works with health services researchers to develop better outcome measures and analytic approaches in a wide range of medical fields, including low-vision, cardiology, arthritis, cancer, chronic pain, asthma, and mental health. Dr. McKnight's work can be found in the American Psychologist, Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, Journal of Public Health, Journal of Applied Measurement, Journal of Pain, and Journal of Asthma, among others. He is the co-author of a forthcoming book (Guilford Press) on missing data from a methodologist's perspective.

Paul J. McNulty is the Deputy Attorney General of the U.S. Department of Justice. With more than 20 years of experience in Federal and State government, he served as the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia for five years, where he focused on the prosecution of terrorism, gun violence, drug trafficking, and corporate fraud and successfully prosecuted many of the nation's high profile cases in the war on terror. He also launched initiatives against gangs, cyber crime, and procurement fraud. Before becoming a U.S. Attorney, Mr. McNulty directed President Bush's transition team for the U.S. Department of Justice and then served as Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General. Additionally, he was the Chief Counsel and Director of Legislative Operations for the Majority Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Chief Counsel to the House Subcommittee on Crime.

Michael Medaris is Senior Policy Advisor for Law Enforcement at the Bureau of Justice Assistance, where he oversees counter-terrorism training and technical assistance activities and manages an initiative to improve the national homicide clearance rate. He retired from the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Police Department as a Captain to become a training instructor at the FBI. Previously, he was Director of the Police Corps Program and a Senior Program Manager of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program at the U.S. Department of Justice. Mr. Medaris recently received the National Performance Review's Hammer Award and the Assistant Attorney General's Award for Excellence. He graduated from the 161st session of the FBI National Academy.

Ada Pecos Melton is President of American Indian Development Associates, an Indian-owned technical assistance, training, research, and evaluation firm that focuses on program and public policy development, crime research, delinquency and violence, and victimization issues throughout Indian country. Ms. Melton is the recipient of the 2005 YWCA Women on the Move Award, the 2000 New Mexico Distinguished Public Service Award, the 1999 Distinguished University of New Mexico Alumni Award, and the 1998 Outstanding Achievement Recognition for Advancing the Needs of Indian Children. She holds a B.A. in Criminal Justice and an M.P.A.

Scott Menard is a Senior Research Associate in the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder. His current research includes an evaluation of a school-based anti-bullying program, an ongoing longitudinal study of pro-social development and problem behavior, and the measurement and strength of effects in logistic regression analysis. He has published in the areas of longitudinal research, logistic regression analysis, delinquency, crime, drug use, and victimization.

Preeti Puri Menon is a Social Science Program Specialist at the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, where she works on the Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Program, the Tribal Youth Program, and several Federal earmark grants. Previously, she worked as a Planning Specialist on contracts with the Maryland Department of Juvenile Justice and the National Institute of Justice. She has co-authored or edited various analytical papers and provided research for the supplement to the Surgeon General's Report on Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity and to the Report on Youth Violence. She holds a B.A. in Criminal Justice and Criminology from the University of Maryland and an M.A. from John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Christopher Miles is a Senior Program Manager at the National Institute of Justice. He manages the Sensors and Surveillance Portfolio, which includes biometrics technologies for remote identification, booking and background checks, corrections access and inmate movement control, school access control and mid-day release verification, firearm technologies in ballistics imaging, smart guns and gunshot detection, sensors for surveillance, concealed weapons detection, license plate recognition, thermal imaging, and video surveillance. Mr. Miles received his B.S. in Electronics Engineering from George Mason University.

Thomas Miller is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of New Hampshire. A member of the faculty since 1979, his technical areas of expertise include software engineering for real-time systems and digital signal processing for communications and control. In 1999, Dr. Miller co-founded the Project54 Program in collaboration with the University of New Hampshire and the New Hampshire Department of Safety. The program focuses on developing an open, standards-based, integrated platform for mobile computing and data communications for State and local public safety vehicles in New Hampshire.

Lois Felson Mock is a Senior Social Scientist at the National Institute of Justice and has been involved in criminal justice research there since 1972. She specializes in the areas of firearms, violence, policing, crime prevention, terrorism, and white collar and organized crime. She has written numerous papers, articles, and reports on these topics and manages NIJ's extensive research program on firearms and violence. She is a member of the core team that is coordinating Project Safe Neighborhoods, an initiative at the U.S. Department of Justice aimed at reducing gun violence.

Nicholas Montanarelli is a consultant to the Defense Applied Research Projects Agency, the Technology Reinvestment Program, the World Bank, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the National Academy of Sciences. He also is the President and CEO of DHB Capitol Group, Inc., and the President of JNP Associates, both of which are involved in the development and production of armor protection materials. Prior to becoming a consultant, Mr. Montanarelli was Deputy Director of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Technology Applications Program. Mr. Montanarelli has held numerous technology transfer positions within Federal agencies. He has a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Maryland.

John S. Morgan is Assistant Director for Science and Technology at the National Institute of Justice. He directs a wide range of technology programs for criminal justice, including the President's DNA Initiative, less lethal technologies, and body armor. Prior to joining NIJ, Dr. Morgan conducted research in detection and mitigation of weapons of mass destruction at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory; and for eight years, he was a Member of the Maryland House of Delegates. He received his B.S. in Physics from Loyola College (Maryland) and his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1990.

Marilyn C. Moses is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice. There since 1991, her work includes Federal disability entitlements for disabled ex-offenders, children of incarcerated parents, women offenders, correctional management, correctional officer retention, correctional health care, offender job training and placement, and reentry. Ms. Moses founded the "Girl Scouts Beyond Bars" program in 1992, an acclaimed program that was the subject of a nationally broadcast documentary, Troop 1500. In 1994, Ms. Moses received the Best in the Business Award from the American Correctional Association.

Carrie Mulford is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice, where she conducts research on juvenile justice, violence prevention, domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault, hate crime, and situational crime prevention. She has co-authored more than 12 scholarly articles focusing on violence prevention and juvenile justice. Dr. Mulford's research includes evaluations of national faith-based initiatives, domestic violence and juvenile court interventions, and a school-based sexual violence prevention program. She received her B.A. from Rice University in 1992 and her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Virginia in 2004.

Edward P. Mulvey is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Medicine, where his research centers on issues related to the use of social services and mental health treatment as a method of social control. He is the principal investigator for a multi-site longitudinal study that examines how serious adolescent offenders make the transition from adolescence to adulthood. He received his B.A. in Psychology from Yale University in 1973 and his Ph.D. in Community and Clinical Psychology from the University of Virginia in 1982.

James K. Nash is an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Social Work at Portland State University. He has conducted research on understanding and preventing youth violence, promoting optimal behavior and development in children and adolescents, and intervention research and quantitative research methods. Dr. Nash directed clinical case management for youth in North Carolina's Willie-M Program, and he recently published an article using semi-parametric modeling to identify trajectories of residential "restrictiveness" among participants in the Willie-M Program. He received an M.S.W. and a Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of North Carolina.

Lisa C. Newmark is a crime victim consultant involved in several initiatives, including a victim-oriented component to offender reentry, a resource center for survivors of homicide, and research projects on victim services. Previously, Ms. Newmark was a Senior Research Associate at the Urban Institute, where her work included the evaluation of the Judicial Oversight Demonstration Projects, an evaluation of the Felony Domestic Violence Court in Brooklyn, the evaluation of Victims of Crime Act Programs, an evaluation of the Crime Victim Compensation Program in Maryland, the National Process Evaluation of the Violence Against Women Act STOP Grant Program, and research on children's exposure to violence between their parents.

Phyllis J. Newton is a Senior Research Scientist at the National Opinion Research Center and has been working in the criminal justice arena for more than 25 years. The national implementation of the Federal sentencing guidelines went into effect under her leadership. She directed the construction of a major data collection system for the U.S. Sentencing Commission that monitored guideline applications in 94 district courts across the country. She also directed a major qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the guideline implementation process and outcome.

Martin Novak is a Program Manager at the National Institute of Justice, where he manages NIJ's Electronic Crime Portfolio. His projects include the Electronic Crime Partnership Initiative, the Predator and Prey Alert System, Project Internet Forensics, the Computer Forensic Tool Testing Program, and Project WHO. Mr. Novak has been with NIJ for eight years and previously served in its National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center system. He holds a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Baltimore and an M.P.A. from George Mason University.

Jennifer Obinna is CEO of World Bridge Research in Minnetonka, Minnesota, and a Field Instructor and Community Lecturer at the School of Social Work at the University of Minnesota. As a researcher and evaluator, she focuses on violence against women, mental health interventions in community contexts, and organizational development. In addition to evaluation and research, Dr. Obinna has a social work background and has worked as a lobbyist, community organizer, and rape crisis counselor. Dr. Obinna has an M.S. in Social Work and a Ph.D. in Social Welfare from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Mike O'Leary is Director of the Applied Mathematics Laboratory in the Department of Mathematics at Towson University. His research includes fluid dynamics and partial differential equations. He also has worked extensively in the area of computer security.

Robert J. O'Leary is President of Electronic Crime Prevention and Investigations and is Director of the Electronic Crime Partnership Initiative. He retired from the High Technology Crimes and Investigations Support Unit (which he helped to establish) of the New Jersey State Police. In 1997, he received the Cellular Telephone and Internet Association Law Enforcement Excellence Award. Mr. O'Leary supervised the first New Jersey Statewide Computer Crimes Task Force and now serves as a consultant to the New Jersey State Police and to a county in Pennsylvania. He is a member, and has been a board member, of a number of prestigious organizations that specialize in high technology crimes. Mr. O'Leary has a B.S. in Business Administration from Bloomberg University.

Andrew V. Papachristos is a research partner of the Project Safe Neighborhoods program in Chicago and is about to begin a four-neighborhood study that examines how the illegal and pro-social social networks of offenders influence crime patterns, gun markets, violence, and perceptions of social order in a neighborhood. His work has appeared in Foreign Policy, Criminology and Public Policy, the Journal of Gang Research, and the Criminal Justice Review. Mr. Papachristos is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at the University of Chicago.

Angela Moore Parmley is Chief of the Violence and Victimization Research Division at the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). She oversees grants, projects, and research in the areas of domestic and sexual violence, child maltreatment, elder abuse, situational crime prevention, victimization, and crime and justice regarding American Indians and Alaska Natives. Dr. Moore Parmley also directs NIJ's Violence Against Women and Family Violence Research and Evaluation Program and conducts research in the areas of intimate partner violence, intimate partner homicide, and police responses to domestic violence. She also is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland-University College. She received her B.S. and M.P.A. from Pennsylvania State University and her Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of Maryland.

Derek J. Paulsen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Police Studies and Director of the Institute for the Spatial Analysis of Crime at Eastern Kentucky University. He has published numerous journal articles dealing with crime mapping and crime analysis, including articles in Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management, the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling, the International Journal of Police Science and Management, and the Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture. Dr. Paulsen speaks on crime mapping both nationally and internationally and is the lead author of the book, Spatial Analysis of Crime: Theory and Practice.

Anne Morrison Piehl is an Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Rutgers University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research on the economics of crime and criminal justice has been published in numerous journals that focus on economics, criminology, sociology, and public policy. Dr. Morrison Piehl received her A.B. in Economics from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University.

Anthony J. Pinizzotto is a Clinical Psychologist and an Instructor in the Behavioral Science Unit (BSU) of the FBI, where he teaches clinical forensic psychology and the psychology of violent behavior. He also is the Program Manager for BSU's Forensic Psychology Program and Chairman of the Forensic Psychology Advisory Board. He is the recipient of awards for service to law enforcement and for research, the author of various articles and books, and a national and international speaker. He has a B.A. in English and an M.A. in Theology and Pastoral Counseling from Allentown College of St. Francis DeSales, an M.A. in Forensic Psychology from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and a Ph.D. in Psychology from Georgetown University.

Bill Piper is Director of National Affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance, a leading drug policy reform organization. He advocates to members of the U.S. Congress on drug-related issues, including the need to take a public health approach to dealing with club drugs. Mr. Piper is a graduate of Indiana University with degrees in Political Science and Economics.

Alex R. Piquero is a Professor of Criminology, Law, and Society and the 2005 Magid Term Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Florida. He has published more than 100 articles on criminal justice, criminal careers, life-course criminology, and quantitative methodology. He has received numerous awards, and in 2002 he was named "top scholar" by the Journal of Criminal Justice. He received his B.A, M.A., and Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of Maryland-College Park.

Henry N. Pontell is a Professor of Criminology, Law, and Society and of Sociology at the University of California-Irvine. He is a former Vice President of the American Society of Criminology, a recipient of the Albert J. Reiss, Jr. Distinguished Scholarship Award from the American Sociological Association, and a recipient of the Donald R. Cressey Award from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners. His most recent books are Profit Without Honor: White-Collar Crime and the Looting of America (4th ed.), with Stephen Rosoff and Robert Tillman (Prentice Hall, 2006); and The International Handbook of White-Collar and Corporate Crime, with Gilbert Geis (Springer, 2006).

Robert Prentky is Director of Research for the Justice Resource Institute in Boston and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. Throughout his 25-year career, he has conducted research on sexual offenders, and as a forensic examiner he has evaluated or supervised the evaluation of more than 2,000 juvenile and adult sex offenders. For the past decade his research has focused on the development of risk assessment procedures for pre-adolescent and adolescent male and female sexual offenders. Dr. Prentky has been on the faculty in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University's Medical School, the Department of Psychology at Brandeis University, and the Graduate School of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University.

W. Stephen Pullen is Deputy Director, Department of Administration and Finance, Virginia Department of Juvenile Justice. Thirty-six years ago, he began his career as a juvenile probation officer with the Newport News Juvenile Probation Department and has held numerous positions in the Juvenile Probation Department and in the Division of Youth Services throughout his career. Mr. Pullen was involved in the separation of the Youth Services Division from the Department of Corrections and the creation of the Department of Youth and Family Services. He received his B.S. in Psychology from Old Dominion University in 1970.

Charles M. Puzzanchera is a Research Associate with the National Center for Juvenile Justice in Pittsburgh. Since 1998, he has managed a project funded by the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency and has helped to develop an online data dissemination application that contains measures of delinquency risk factors for each county in Pennsylvania. Mr. Puzzanchera also is actively involved with several projects for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, managing the Statistical Briefing Book website. Additionally, Mr. Puzzanchera is the Manager of Data Analysis for the National Juvenile Court Data Archive and co-authors the annual Juvenile Court Statistics Report. He received his B.A. from the University of Florida and his M.A. in Criminology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Winifred L. Reed is Acting Chief of the Crime Control and Prevention Research Division at the National Institute of Justice. She manages the research and evaluation portfolios of the division including those in policing, crime mapping, and crime prevention. She has worked in a wide range of substantive areas during her more than 30 years at NIJ, including law enforcement, Indian country crime and justice, gangs, school-based programs, criminal careers, criminal behavior, and crime prevention. Ms. Reed received her B.A. and M.A. from the American University.

Claire M. Renzetti is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Dayton. She is editor for the journal Violence Against Women; co-editor of the Interpersonal Violence Book Series for the Oxford University Press; and editor of the Gender, Crime, and Law Book Series for Northeastern University Press/University Press of New England. She has authored or edited 16 books, book chapters, and articles in professional journals. Her current research focuses on the violent victimization experiences of economically marginalized women living in public housing developments. Dr. Renzetti has held positions on the governing bodies of several national professional organizations and is currently President of the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

Kirk Rice is the program manager of Weapons and Protective Systems in the Office of Law Enforcement Standards at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He oversees a number of projects aimed at developing performance standards and test protocols for law enforcement and corrections equipment, including ballistic and stab-resistant body armor, pistols, handcuffs, and helmets. He is the Technical Team Leader for the Body Armor Safety Initiative of the U.S. Attorney General. He has a degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Maryland and in Engineering Administration from the George Washington University.

John Roman is a Senior Research Associate in the Justice Policy Center at the Urban Institute, where his research focuses on evaluations of innovative crime control policies and programs. Mr. Roman is directing a cost-effectiveness study of the use of DNA in burglary investigations, a national study on the demand for community-based interventions with drug-involved arrestees, and the evaluation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Reclaiming Futures Initiative. He also is the manager of the National Evaluation of Adult Drug Courts and is co-editor of Juvenile Drug Courts and Teen Substance Abuse.

Todd Rogers, Ph.D., is Research Program Director with the Public Health Institute, Oakland, California, where he specializes in evaluation of public health programs. He is principal investigator on the Evaluation of Turning Point, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) program designed to transform and strengthen the public health system. He is also an investigator on the RWJF-funded National Evaluation of Free to Grow, a substance abuse prevention initiative. While at Stanford University (1987-1997), Dr. Rogers led the evaluation of the California Wellness Foundation's Violence Prevention Initiative. Dr. Rogers serves on the editorial boards of Tobacco Control and Health Education Research.

André B. Rosay is an Assistant Professor in the Justice Center at the University of Alaska-Anchorage. He is actively involved in research on violence against women and has collaborated with police departments, state troopers, sexual assault nurse examiners, and prosecutors to study this problem. Dr. Rosay currently is engaged in two projects that study the characteristics of sexual assaults, domestic assaults, and stalking incidents and that examine how these characteristics affect case processing.

Kristina Rose is Chief of Staff for the Office on Violence Against Women of the U.S. Department of Justice. Ms. Rose is responsible for assisting with the overall operation of the office, managing internal and external office coordination and communication, and advising the Director on policy and administrative issues.

Leora N. Rosen is a Senior Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice, where she manages studies on a wide range of topics in the area of violence against women and family violence. These include studies on custody and visitation, cross-cultural issues, measurement, and the use of violence by women. Dr. Rosen previously worked for the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, where she specialized in research on military families and women in the military. She co-edited a book on military families and has published numerous articles on topics related to women in the military and military families.

Mark F. Rubin is a Research Associate with the Statistical Analysis Center in Maine. He is the lead author of the annual Maine Crime and Justice Data Book and works on various initiatives, including the Maine Adult Probationer Recidivism Project. Previously, Mr. Rubin was Director of Research and Neighborhood Information Services at DC Agenda, a non-profit intermediary, and a Research Associate at the Urban Institute, where his research focused on economic development and housing challenges for low-income residents. Mr. Rubin received a B.A. in International Relations from Johns Hopkins University and an M.A. in Urban Planning from Columbia University.

Pamela Scanlon is Executive Director of the Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS), which is an integrated justice enterprise network used by more than 71 criminal justice agencies throughout San Diego and Imperial Counties. ARJIS is the information hub for public safety incidents, gang information, service calls, officer notification, and the like. It uses operational and technical standards to build seamless interfaces that share information in real time. Previously, Ms. Scanlon was Manager of the Data Systems Division of the San Diego Police Department. She received her B.A. in Public Administration from Oregon State University.

Glenn R. Schmitt is the Deputy Director and Acting Director of the National Institute of Justice. Prior to joining NIJ, he was the Chief Counsel to the Subcommittee on Crime of the House Committee on the Judiciary, where he helped draft a number of significant pieces of legislation that have become law, including the 1996 anti-terrorism bill, the Economic Espionage Act of 1996, and the DNA Backlog Elimination Act of 2000. Prior to his work in the prior service, Mr. Schmitt was a commercial litigator at Thompson, Hine and Flory in Cleveland, Ohio and Washington, DC. He received his B.S. from Indiana State University and his J.D. from the University of Notre Dame Law School. He also holds an M.P.P. from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Teri Schroeder is the CEO of i-SAFE America, a non-profit foundation that distributes Internet safety education. i-SAFE America's curricula, materials, and trainings are provided free of charge to schools and communities across the United States. i-SAFE is also the exclusive Internet safety educator of all Department of Defense schools around the world. While Ms. Schroeder was CEO of a content provider on America Online, she realized her true calling was to help children. She left that career to start i-SAFE and focus on Internet safety education. Previously, she had been employed in upper management positions in electronic publishing and online communications for more than 20 years and was named Entrepreneur of the Year by California Lawyer Magazine. Ms. Schroeder graduated from the University of San Diego.

Carol A. Schubert is a Research Program Administrator at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Medicine. She has served as the Project Coordinator for several large, community-based research projects on violence and mental illness and currently is the Project Coordinator for the Pathways to Desistance Study, a multi-site, longitudinal investigation of how serious adolescent offenders make the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

Martin D. Schwartz is a Professor of Sociology at Ohio University and a former Visiting Fellow at the National Institute of Justice. He has written or edited 20 editions of 11 books; 65 journal articles; and 40 book chapters, reports, and essays. Twice, he was named Graduate Professor of the Year and Best Arts and Sciences Professor, while being the first social scientist to win the university's research achievement award, the title of Presidential Research Scholar. Dr. Schwartz has received distinguished scholar awards from two divisions of the American Society of Criminology.

Thomas J. Sexton is a Senior Advisor for Law Enforcement in the Research and Technology Development Division at the National Institute of Justice. Upon his retirement from law enforcement in 1997, he was appointed Director of the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center's Southeast Region. He received his M.A. in Criminal Justice from the University of South Carolina.

John S. Shaffer is Executive Deputy Secretary for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. He is responsible for the internal operations of the department's correctional institutions, the motivational boot camps, and the community corrections centers. During his 29-year career, Dr. Shaffer has held positions as a counselor, a personnel analyst, a business manager, a litigation project director, a deputy superintendent for facilities management, a warden, and as Deputy Secretary for Administration for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. In 2002, Dr. Shaffer received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Pennsylvania Prison Wardens' Association.

Robert C. Shaler is a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director of the Forensic Science Program at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State). From 1978 until 2005, he worked in the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in New York City. In the wake of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, he implemented a DNA-testing strategy that was key to the identification of more than half of those who perished in the tragedy. A member of several national scientific organizations, Dr. Shaler has held positions at the University of Pittsburgh, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and New York University. He has a B.S. in Chemistry from Franklin and Marshall College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Penn State.

Lester D. Shubin was the Director of the Science and Technology Program at the National Institute of Justice from 1971 to 1993, where he managed the development and testing of prototype soft body armor. He also managed NIJ's Standards and Testing Program for body armor and for other types of equipment and technology related to law enforcement and corrections. Prior to his work at NIJ, he was a Senior Scientist at Exotech, Inc., and Melpar, Inc.; a Materials Engineer for Westinghouse Electric Corp.; and the Chief Chemist at Baldwim-Lima-Hamilton Corp. Mr. Shubin is a World War II veteran who earned a B.A. in Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in Chemistry from Drexel University.

Laurel Shuster is the Manager of Indian Country Initiatives at the Office for Victims of Crime, where her latest project is the Tribal Victim Assistance Discretionary Grant Program. She also specializes in the development of programs that benefit victims of Federal crime. A clinical psychologist, Dr. Shuster worked and lived in American Indian communities from 1996 to 2000. She has worked extensively with child abuse victims, domestic violence victims, and family members of homicide victims.

Melissa Sickmund is a Senior Research Associate with the National Center for Juvenile Justice, which she joined in 1986. Her work focuses on female offenders, juvenile court handling of offenders, juvenile transfers to criminal court, and juveniles in correctional settings. She is the principal investigator of the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement. She is best known for the Juvenile Offenders and Victims publication series, which she co-authored with Dr. Howard Snyder.

Cornelia Sorensen Sigworth is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice, where she manages NIJ's Trafficking in Persons Portfolio and several ongoing juvenile justice evaluations. Prior to joining the International Center, she worked in NIJ's Evaluation Division, where she focused on improving the quality, utility, and effectiveness of NIJ's evaluations through development and implementation of evaluation standards and methods. She holds an M.S. in Justice, Law, and Society from American University.

Asuncion Simmonds is a Research Engineer in the Naval Air Systems Command Training Systems Division and has 17 years of experience in training and simulation. Her experience includes requirements analysis, vocabulary and scenario development, and the testing and evaluation of training systems/simulators and speech-to-speech translation devices. She was a systems engineer for various U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps training systems and the Lead Project Engineer for Air Traffic Control, Aviation A-Schools, and Landing Signal Officer Training Systems. She earned her B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Central Florida.

Brent L. Smith is a Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Arkansas and Director of the Terrorism Research Center at Fulbright College. He was an instructor for the Counter-terrorism Course of the U.S. Army Military Police School and the Department Chairperson in the Department of Justice Sciences at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. He is the Director of the American Terrorism Study, maintaining a database and records of Federal terrorism cases since 1980. Dr. Smith is the author of Terrorism in America: Pipe Bombs and Pipe Dreams (SUNY Press, 1994); and his publications on terrorism have appeared in Criminology, Criminology and Public Policy, Justice Quarterly, and other scholarly outlets. He received his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1979.

Cindy J. Smith is a Fulbright Senior Researcher in Turkey, researching trafficking in human beings. She also is an Associate Professor in the Division of Criminology, Criminal Justice, and Social Policy at the University of Baltimore. Dr. Smith has a long and varied research and publication history in program evaluation, including prison work programs, juvenile sex offender treatment, and drug treatment; international criminology, including methods, high tech crimes, and suicide terrorism; and policy, addressing issues such as restorative justice, juvenile waivers, chronic offenders, and gender differences in the juvenile system.

Michael Sparks is the Policy Director at the Center for Community Action and Training. Previously, he served as an Associate Director for the Free to Grow Initiative at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. From 1992 to 2003, Mr. Sparks was the Interim Executive Director and Project Director for Community Programs at the Vallejo Fighting Back Partnership. He was the first Executive Director of the Marin Institute for the Prevention of Alcohol and Other Drug Problems and one of four founders of that organization in 1987.

Jeff M. Spivey is Director of Security Risk Management, Inc., a security consulting firm that provides services throughout the U.S. He also is the President of ASIS International and a member of the Overseas Security Advisory Council at the U.S. Department of State. Previously, Mr. Spivey was a member of the Mecklenburg County (North Carolina) Police Department and a security expert with a company that is now the Bank of America. The author of several articles in security trade journals, he speaks at various security, risk management, criminal investigation, and counter-terrorism conferences throughout the country. He is a Certified Protection Professional and a Certified Physical Security Professional. Mr. Spivey earned his B.S. in Criminal Justice Management from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte.

Philip Stanford is a Detective with the Denver Police Department, where he focuses on burglaries, auto thefts, and crimes against persons. He has worked with the Denver Police Department for 11 years. He received his B.A. in Political Science from Colorado State University and his M.A. in Criminal Justice from the University of Denver.

John C. Steiger is Deputy Director of the Washington State Caseload Forecast Council, which forecasts entitlement caseloads. With 25 years of experience directing social research, evaluation, and policy analysis, he uses a mix of time series and cohort models to forecast kindergarten through 12th grade enrollment; and juvenile corrections, foster care, and adoption caseloads. He developed and implemented Washington's first juvenile risk assessment instrument, was the Research Director for the Juvenile and Adult Sentencing Guidelines Commissions, and co-founded the National Association of Sentencing Guidelines Commissions.

Karen R. Stern is a Program Manager in the Demonstration Programs Division of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. A clinical psychologist, Dr. Stern is responsible for numerous projects related to mental health and juvenile justice and serves on various committees and task forces related to child and adolescent mental health. Previously, Dr. Stern worked for the Community Services Board in Alexandria, Virginia, where she taught classes in psychological assessment, developed and managed a clinic for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and provided individual child and family therapy. Dr. Stern received her B.A. in Psychology from the University of Rochester and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Eric A. Stewart is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and a member of the National Consortium on Violence Research. Dr. Stewart is a W.E.B. DuBois Fellow with the National Institute of Justice. His research interests include crime over the life course; the influence of neighborhood, school, and family processes on adolescent development; and testing criminological theories. He has published articles in Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, and Justice Quarterly. He earned a B.A. in Criminal Justice from Fort Valley State University in 1995, an M.S. in Sociology from Auburn University in 1996, and a Ph.D. in Sociology from Iowa State University in 2000.

David L. Sylvester is employed with National Forensic Science Technology Center, where his responsibilities include project management specifically related to quality system support. His projects include the Quality Documents Program, the Fire Debris Validation/Verification Kit, and the Field Investigation Drug Officer Project. He is also the Program Director for the DNA Grant Progress Assessments Program. Retired from the Indiana State Police Department with 25 years of service, his tenure included positions as a road trooper, crime scene investigator, polygraph examiner, lab director, and section commander. He also was the Emergency Response Team Leader and Statewide Coordinator of the Clandestine Laboratory Response Team. Mr. Sylvester received his B.S. in Criminal Justice and his M.P.A. from Indiana University.

Faye S. Taxman is a Professor in the Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University and is the principal investigator for the Coordinating Center of the Criminal Justice National Drug Treatment Studies, where she directs a national survey of practices in correctional settings and is involved in several experimental studies. She also is the principal investigator on two studies devoted to understanding the adoption of science-based practices in criminal and juvenile justice systems. Dr. Taxman is the lead author of Tools of the Trade: A Guide to Incorporating Science into Practice and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Experimental Criminology and the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation. She has published articles in the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, and the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, among others.

Richard Tewksbury is Research Director for the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission and a Professor of Justice Administration at the University of Louisville. Previously, Dr. Tewksbury was a Visiting Fellow with the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the Research Director at the Kentucky State Reformatory, and a consultant to numerous state and local correctional systems. His research focuses on issues of correctional institution violence, sex offenders and offenses, and criminal victimization risks.

David R. Thomas is a Senior Advisor to the Maryland Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention and the Assistant Director of the Domestic Violence Education Program at Johns Hopkins University. Retired from the Montgomery County Police Department, his final assignment there was in the Domestic Violence Unit, which he helped found. He was recently awarded the 21st Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Service Award by Johns Hopkins and has received numerous other awards, including silver and bronze medals of valor and policeman of the year. He also trains law enforcement, prosecutors, and judges on behalf of the U.S. Department of State. He received his B.A. from Towson University and his M.A. from the University of Maryland.

Terence P. Thornberry is Director of the Problem Behavior Program at the Institute of Behavioral Science and a Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado. He is also the principal investigator of the Rochester Youth Development Study, which examines the causes and consequences of delinquency and other forms of antisocial behavior. He is the author or editor of ten books, including Gangs and Delinquency in Developmental Perspective, which received the American Society of Criminology's Michael J. Hindelang Award for the Most Outstanding Contribution to Research in Criminology. His research focuses on understanding the development of delinquency and crime over the life course.

Robert L. Trestman is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut's Health Center (UCHC), and is Director of the Center for Correctional Mental Health Services Research and of the UCHC Signature Program, Connecticut Health. Previously, Dr. Trestman was Deputy Chairperson and Clinical Chief of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Trestman has conducted research into the neuro-psychology and neuro-biology of severe mood and personality disorders, studied correctional mental health and mental health service delivery, been responsible for clinical care system design and program implementation. and advocated for the de-stigmatization of those with severe mental disorders. He earned his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology and his M.D. from the University of Tennessee.

Linda Truitt manages drug court and mental health court/jail diversion program evaluations and research on case management, indigent defense, community prosecution, sentencing, and appeals for the National Institute of Justice. Prior to joining NIJ, Dr. Truitt conducted criminal justice and drug policy research and evaluation at the New York State Division of Substance Abuse Services, the New York City Criminal Justice Agency, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the U.S. Government Accounting Office and Abt Associates. Dr. Truitt also has been involved in adult and family treatment drug court evaluations, heroin data collection program reviews, sentencing disparity and guidelines assessments, and methamphetamine production and trafficking reviews.

Lois A. Tully is Deputy Chief of the Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division of the National Institute of Justice and manages NIJ's Forensic DNA Research and Development Program. Previously, Dr. Tully was a staff molecular biologist and Laboratory Supervisor at Cellmark Diagnostics. Dr. Tully received a B.S. in Medical Technology from Temple University, an M.S. in Forensic Sciences from the George Washington University, and a Ph.D. in Human Genetics from the University of Maryland-Baltimore. She performed her doctoral dissertation research at the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory.

Cheryl Guidry Tyiska coordinates day-to-day programming, including the National Crisis Response Team, for the National Organization for Victim Assistance. She focuses on serving historically underserved crime and disaster populations. She is past President of the Board of the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster and is a survivor of both a violent crime and a natural disaster. She has coordinated services to thousands of crime victims, responded to numerous national and international disasters, coordinated outreach to hundreds of traumatized communities, led numerous trainings, and spoken in the U.S. and abroad. She has published several articles on crisis and victim-related topics and has received honors related to her work.

Kerri Vitalo-Logan is the State Policy Advisor for California at the Bureau of Justice Assistance, serving as the primary point of contact for formula and discretionary program information dissemination. She is responsible for monitoring projects, highlighting innovative and effective programs, and internally relaying information specific to California to assist policy development. She also has managed evaluations of employment and job training programs at the U.S. Department of Labor and served as a Child Protective Investigator with the Manatee County (Florida) Sheriff's Office. Ms. Vitalo-Logan received her B.A. in Sociology from the University of Notre Dame and her M.A. in Sociology from the University of Florida.

Mary Ann Viverette is Chief of Police of the Gaithersburg (Maryland) Police Department (GPD). With GPD since 1979, she had held all ranks until her appointment as Chief in 1986. Chief Viverette is President of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and a member of the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association. In June of 2002, Chief Viverette was appointed as a Commissioner with the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies and is its Vice President for 2005 to 2006. She received her B.S. in Law Enforcement/ Criminology and her M.S. in Human Resource Management from the University of Maryland. She also graduated from the FBI National Academy in 1988.

Richard W. Vorder Bruegge is an Examiner of Questioned Photographic Evidence for the FBI. His work involves analyzing film, video, and digital images that relate to crime and intelligence matters, as well as testifying in court to these findings. Mr. Vorder Bruegge also oversees research in forensic image analysis. He has testified more than 40 times in Federal, State and international courts. He was Chairperson of the Scientific Working Group on Imaging Technology from 2000 to 2006.

Cheryl Crawford Watson is the Human Subjects Protection Officer for the National Institute of Justice, ensuring that research complies with the human subjects protection and confidentiality regulations of the U.S. Department of Justice. Since joining NIJ in 1987, she has directed the identification of criminal justice innovations, the design and monitoring of research demonstration programs, and the assessment and implementation of large criminal justice programs. Additionally, she has managed programs designed to assist with strategic planning, research support, and dissemination of findings. Ms. Watson holds an M.A. in Public Administration and a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Cathy Spatz Widom is a Distinguished Professor in the Psychology Department at John Jay College and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, American Psychopathological Association, and American Society of Criminology. Dr. Widom has received numerous awards for her research and has been on the faculty of several universities, including Harvard and Indiana Universities. Since 1986, she has been studying the long-term consequences of childhood physical and sexual abuse and neglect, with a particular focus on the intergenerational transmission of violence.

Ronald E. Wilson is a Program Manager at the National Institute of Justice. Throughout his career, he has studied the use of geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial analysis as applied to crime. He developed a regional crime analysis known as the Regional Crime Analysis GIS, now used in the Baltimore Metropolitan Region, which won him Al Gore's National Partnership for Reinventing Government Award in 2000. Previously, Mr. Wilson was Chairperson for the Geography Working Group of the Data Documentation Initiative. He earned his B.A. in Geology from Thiel College and his M.A. in Geography from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He is in the process of obtaining his M.S. in Software Engineering from the University of Maryland.

Marianne Winters is Director of the Everywoman's Center at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. With more than 20 years of experience in the movement to end violence against women, she has received several awards for her work. She has provided national leadership in the areas of confidentiality of counselor communications, diversity, inclusion of people with disabilities, rape crisis, substance abuse, and mental health. Ms. Winters edited a training manual and curriculum entitled "Supporting Survivors of Sexual Assault" and was the primary author of "Taking Action Against Sexual Assault: A Call to Action for Massachusetts."

Sandra L. Woerle is a Social Science Analyst at the National Institute of Justice, where she is responsible for overseeing research on drugs and crime, transnational crime and terrorism, and civil justice issues. Ms. Woerle has conducted research on illicit poly-drug use, treatment needs among inmates, and alcohol dependence. She has a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Superior and an M.A. from the University of Wyoming. She is completing her doctorate at the University of New Mexico.

Janis Wolak is a Research Assistant Professor at the Crimes Against Children Research Center of the University of New Hampshire. She is the author and co-author of numerous articles about child victimization, Internet-related sex crimes, and youth Internet use; and is Director of the First and Second Youth Internet Safety Surveys, the National Juvenile Online Victimization Study, and the National Juvenile Prostitution Study. She has a B.A. in Sociology from New College, an M.A. in Sociology from the University of New Hampshire, and a J.D. from Southwestern University School of Law.

Mark Wolfson is an Associate Professor at Wake Forest University's School of Medicine. His research focuses on the adoption, implementation, and impact of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug policy and prevention. He is the principal investigator of the Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Randomized Community Trial and is director of the national evaluation of Free to Grow: Head Start Partnerships to Promote Substance-free Communities. Dr. Wolfson is also the principal investigator of the Study to Prevent Alcohol-related Consequences, which targets high risk drinking by college students.

Jerry Woods is an engineer specializing in the field of robotics and motion control, with more than 18 years of software/firmware development, ten years of electrical engineering, and five years of mechanical design experience. He also is an expert in Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) stacks, Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP), audio and video compression algorithms, 2D/3D video game development, digital signal processing, micro controller, and Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) design. Mr. Woods was the principal software developer on the Multi-Function Grenade Simulation Project responsible for conversion of the Half-Life game engine into a simulation tool.

Margaret A. Zahn is principal investigator of the Girls Study Group and a Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at North Carolina State University. A criminologist with 30 years of experience in violence research, she has led a number of research projects, including studies of intimate partner homicide and multi-city studies of homicide. She has edited three books on violence and homicide and has published extensively in social science and criminology journals.

Edwin W. Zedlewski is Deputy Assistant Director for Research and Evaluation at the National Institute of Justice and is responsible for shaping research and evaluation programs that result in better policy and practice nationwide. Dr. Zedlewski has served both as a researcher and an administrator on criminal justice policy, program evaluation, and organizational performance measurement. He has been a Special Consultant to the Solicitor General of the United States, the President's Organized Crime Commission, the U.S. Sentencing Commission, and working groups for the White House Office of Science and Technology. Dr. Zedlewski is the author of numerous articles on program evaluation and crime control.

Date Created: November 27, 2007