NIJ Conference 2006 Agenda

The NIJ Conference 2006 Agenda

Updated July 3, 2006

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday



Monday, July 17, 2006

Registration

7:30 am - 5:00 pm Capitol Foyer

Welcome and Opening Remarks

8:30 am - 8:45 am
Salons I/II/III

Plenary Panel

Getting Serious About Crime Fighting:
The Future of Public Safety Policy and Research

8:45 am - 10:15 am Salons I/II/III
By all official measures, crime is at its lowest point in more than two decades. But official crime statistics measure only some types of crime, such as homicides and assaults, robberies, burglaries, larcenies, and auto thefts. We don't accurately know the extent of consumer fraud, embezzlement, bribery, and corruption, let alone drug sales, sexual assault, or child endangerment. New, "21st Century" crimes-child pornography, identity theft, e-crime, and transnational smuggling of weapons and people add to this complexity. So it is difficult to assess whether crime in the larger sense has actually declined, whether new types of crimes are on the rise, or the extent to which offenders have adapted and migrated into new, lucrative types of criminal activity.

Panelists with diverse perspectives consider how we might find the "dark figures" of crimes, and arrest and prosecute the people behind them. What measurement systems need to be brought into being? How do we research these hidden operations and what are the solutions? How do we get ahead of the criminals adapting their methods? What does training for the 21st Century justice system have to accomplish? The panel promises a stimulating and provocative exchange for a diverse audience.

Moderator

Thomas E. Feucht, Assistant Director for Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Alfred Blumstein, Professor, H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA

Jack R. Greene, Dean and Professor, College of Criminal Justice, Northeastern University, Boston, MA

Martin F. Horn, Commissioner, New York City Departments of Corrections and Probation, New York, NY

Paul A. Logli, State's Attorney, Winnebago County State's Attorney's Office, Rockford, IL

Jeff M. Spivey, President, ASIS International, Alexandria, VA


10:15 am - 10:30 am                           Break


Concurrent Panels

Role of Offender and Victim Substance Use in Sexual Assault

10:30 am - 12:00 pm Salon D
Understanding the nature of alcohol and other drug use by perpetrators and victims of sexual assault is critical for practitioners who work to prevent sexual assault, intervene to encourage reporting of sexual assault, and prosecute cases of sexual violence. Two studies discussed in this panel offer unique insights into the role that alcohol and other drug use play in the context of sexual assault. The first is a national, longitudinal study that examines patterns of substance use in acts of sexual violence over time and between generations. The second is a study conducted in Alaska that focuses on the effect of alcohol use by victims and suspects in terms of time-lapse for reporting, severity of ano-genital injuries, and spatial patterns of reported sexual assault.

Moderator

Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Scott Menard, Senior Research Associate, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

Andre B. Rosay, Assistant Professor, Justice Center, University of Alaska, Anchorage, AK

Marianne Winters, Director, Everywoman's Center, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA


Examining the Impacts of DNA

10:30 am - 12:00 pm Salon E
With advances in technology, DNA evidence has become an increasingly powerful tool for solving crimes. Law enforcement officials have used DNA to solve violent crimes and have more recently focused on using DNA to solve cold cases. Now there is evidence suggesting that DNA may be useful in solving high-volume property crimes and may prevent future property crimes and more serious offenses. The National Institute of Justice has several major projects underway that explore the impact of DNA evidence. This panel will present preliminary findings from these projects, focusing on current efforts to explore the social science of DNA.

Moderator

Katharine Browning, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Heather Clawson, Vice President, Caliber, an ICF International Company, Fairfax, VA

John Roman, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, The Urban Institute, Washington, DC

Phillip Stanford, Detective, Investigations Department, Denver Police Department, Denver, CO


Using Global Positioning Systems to Supervise
Sex Offenders in the Community

10:30 am - 12:00 pm Salon F
Although more jurisdictions require sex offenders to wear a global positioning system (GPS) monitoring device either as a condition of probation or upon release from incarceration, there are studies on the impact of this approach on the criminal justice system. Given limited resources, the most comprehensive system of tracking should be used for the most serious offenders. The panelists will discuss field research related to sex offender monitoring, the science behind and technological aspects of monitoring, and how to develop a successful, comprehensive monitoring program.

Moderator

Gary D. MacLellan, Program Manager, Research and Technology Development Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Paul S. Brennan, Supervisory Community Supervision Officer, Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency, Washington, DC

David Ensley, Chief, Research and Data Analysis, Florida Department of Corrections, Tallahassee, FL

Mike Epstein, Senior Program Manager, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-West, El Segundo, CA


Digital Evidence: Investigations, Evidence Preservation, and Analysis

10:30 am - 12:00 pm Salon G
The number of crimes committed that involve digital evidence continues to grow exponentially. How well are we equipped to handle that evidence during the investigation, at the crime scene, and during analysis? This panel will discuss the current state of digital evidence, the tools available to law enforcement, and the challenges that may lie ahead.

Moderator

Martin Novak, Program Manager, Research and Technology Development Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Mark Hirsh, System Engineer, Defense Cyber Crime Institute, Linthicum, MD

Robert J. O'Leary, Director, Electronic Crime Partnership Initiative, Milford, NJ


Portraits of Contemporary Adolescent Offending

10:30 am - 12:00 pm Salon I
What does offending look like in contemporary adolescents? At what age does offending begin? Is offending associated with family, peer, or school factors? Once adolescents commit serious offenses and are adjudicated, what sanctions and services do they and can they receive? To what degree are their substance use and mental health problems assessed and treated? Are these offenders destined to re-offend? Drawing on two longitudinal datasets, this panel will present an in-depth picture of serious adolescent offenders.

Moderator

Akiva M. Liberman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Edward P. Mulvey, Professor of Psychiatry, Director of Law and Psychiatry Research, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, PA

Carol A. Schubert, Research Program Administrator, Law and Psychiatry Research, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, PA

Melissa Sickmund, Senior Research Associate, National Center for Juvenile Justice, Pittsburgh, PA

Discussant

Michael A. Corriero, Judge, Court of Claims, Supreme Court of the State of New York, New York, NY


Criminal Justice Lessons Learned from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

10:30 am - 12:00 pm Salon IV
The Gulf Coast hurricanes last summer created unprecedented challenges for the region's criminal justice system. This panel will describe some of challenges endured during this experience, including coordination and communications issues, resource allocation, correctional system management, victim services provisions, and prosecutorial impacts. All too often, in the chaos that follows a natural disaster, violent crime erupts. The panelists will discuss the factors that trigger violence in the aftermath of a natural disaster and the range of resources and support required for an effective response. They also will highlight critical communications connectivity, inter-operability issues, and incident management procedures.

Moderator

Cornelia Sorensen Sigworth, Social Science Analyst, International Center, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

James Austin, President, The JFA Institute, Washington, DC

Stan Harris, First Assistant U.S. Attorney, Southern District of Mississippi, U.S. Department of Justice, Gulfport, MS

Cheryl Guidry Tyiska, Deputy Director, National Organization for Victim Assistance, Alexandria, VA



Luncheon and Keynote Presentation
12:20 pm - 1:30 pm Salons I/II/III


Using Research to Inform Police Policy and Practice

William J. Bratton, Chief of Police, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles, CA



Concurrent Panels

Who Are We Missing? Addressing the Criminal Justice Needs of
Sexual Assault Victims from Diverse Communities

1:50 pm - 3:15 pm Salon D
This panel will present findings from sexual violence research on underrepresented communities funded by the National Institute of Justice. The first presentation will focus on the needs of survivors of sexual assault who are hearing impaired. Conducted in Minneapolis, this study was completed last November and challenges practitioners to reconsider whether and how to attend to this community. The second presentation will focus on findings from a study conducted in Maryland that sought to understand the experiences of African-American women sexually assaulted, and to better understand the different experience of African-American and Caucasian women who are sexually assaulted and who received subsequent services.

Moderator

Nicole D. Gaskin-Laniyan, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Jennifer Pollitt Hill, Executive Director, Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault, Arnold, MD

Jennifer Obinna, Chief Executive Officer, World Bridge Research, Minnetonka, MN

Discussant

Jessica Braider, Training and Research Coordinator, National Sexual Assault Online Hotline of the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network, Washington, DC


Methamphetamine Linkages: Production, Enforcement, and Policy

1:50 pm - 3:15 pm Salon E
The manufacture and use of methamphetamine have brought significant public safety and health concerns to much of the U.S. This panel will examine all aspects of methamphetamine, from trafficking to manufacturing to State control. The panel is composed of three grantees from the National Institute of Justice who are on the front lines of the methamphetamine epidemic. The panelists will discuss their problems with, and solutions for, this emerging problem.

Moderator

Sandra L. Woerle, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Ko-Lin Chin, Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ

Dana E. Hunt, Principal Scientist, Abt Associates Inc., Cambridge, MA

Duane C. McBride, Director, Institute for the Prevention of Addictions, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI

David L. Sylvester, Deputy Chief Scientist, Scientific Operations, National Forensic Science Technology Center, Largo, FL


Impact of Identity Theft on Victims:
New Research and Services for Victims

1:50 pm - 3:15 pm Salon F
The crime of identity theft affects more than three million American households annually. Presenters will discuss new data from the National Crime Victimization Survey of the Bureau of Justice Statistics and from the Identity Theft Resource Center about the prevalence of identity theft and its impact on victims. They also will discuss the new law enforcement-based program in Ohio (the Identity Theft Verification Passport Program) that uses state-of-the-art biometric technology to help victims restore their lives and their good names.

Moderator

Laura Ivkovich, Social Science Program Specialist, Training and Information Dissemination Division, Office for Victims of Crime, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Katrina Baum, Statistician, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Jonathan M. Bowman, Senior Deputy Attorney General, Crime Victim Services Section, Ohio Office of the Attorney General, Columbus, OH

Henry N. Pontell, Professor, Department of Criminology, Law, and Society, University of California, Irvine, CA


Protecting Law Enforcement Officers: What Does the Future Hold?

1:50 pm - 3:15 pm Salon G
This panel will discuss the body armor standards and testing program of the National Institute of Justice and the future challenges to law enforcement in the U.S. The panelists will discuss the effect of mandatory vest wear policies and why many agencies do not have these policies. They also will present information on the Safe Shield Program, an initiative of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the goal of which is a future where no officers are injured or killed on duty. They will present findings from a survey on the nature of police injuries and how technology can help prevent those injuries and will assess the FBI Behavioral Sciences Unit's research on the circumstances of violent assaults on police officers.

Moderators

Marc Caplan, Chief, Technology Assistance Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Michael Medaris, Senior Policy Advisor, Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Peter L. Carnes, Chief, Yarmouth Police Department, West Yarmouth, MA

Anthony J. Pinizzotto, Clinical Forensic Psychologist, Behavioral Science Unit, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice, Quantico, VA

Kirk Rice, Program Manager, Weapons and Protective Systems, Office of Law Enforcement Standards, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD


Measuring Criminal Justice Impacts

1:50 pm - 3:15 pm Salon I
In most cases, evaluations of criminal justice programs fall short of measuring long-term impacts. Law enforcement agencies often report arrests as their outcome measure though they would prefer to report crime reductions as their measure. Similarly, corrections programs tend to report re-arrests due to the difficulties of estimating the numbers of future crimes that may have been averted. Because it is important to portray program benefits in terms of public safety outcomes, the National Institute of Justice will sponsor research to measure important long-term outcomes. This panel will feature two studies that assess crimes averted, one from the viewpoint of the cost-effectiveness of DNA forensics, and the other from an assessment of the impacts of changes in incarceration policy.

Moderator

Edwin W. Zedlewski, Deputy Assistant Director for Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Shawn D. Bushway, Associate Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Gerald Gaes, Visiting Scientist, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Anne Morrison Piehl, Associate Professor, Economics Department and Program in Criminal Justice, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ


Recent Findings from OJJDP's Causes
and Correlates Program of Research

1:50 pm - 3:15 pm Salon IV
The Program of Research on the Causes and Correlates of Juvenile Delinquency includes three coordinated longitudinal research projects conducted since 1986. These projects were designed to improve the understanding of serious delinquency, violence, and drug use by examining how individual youth develop within the context of family, school, peers, and community. A milestone in research on criminology, this study constitutes the largest shared measurement approach ever achieved in delinquency research.

Moderator

Karen R. Stern, Program Manager, Demonstration Programs Division, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

David Huizinga, Senior Research Associate, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

Terence P. Thornberry, Professor, Department of Sociology, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

Rolf Loeber, Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA


3:15 pm - 3:30 pm                           Break



Concurrent Panels

What Do We Know After Ten Years of
Violence Against Women Research Funding?

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Salon D
Since 1998, the National Institute of Justice has received dedicated funding from the Violence Against Women Act. Prior to that, funds for research and evaluation were transferred from the Office on Violence Against Women. As a result, NIJ has managed more than 200 grants on intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and stalking. At this critical juncture (following passage of the Violence Against Women Act of 2005), this panel will explore what knowledge has been gained from this dedicated funding stream and the literature on violence against women. Researchers and practitioners alike will benefit from learning about the implications of the extant research funded by NIJ.

Moderator

Jocelyn Fontaine, Research Assistant, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Anna D. Wolfe Chair and Professor, School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Claire M. Renzetti, Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH

Discussant

Angela Moore Parmley, Chief, Violence and Victimization Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC


Does Institutional Review Board Oversight
Interfere With Good Research?

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Salon E
We tase, lase, interview, and otherwise subject humans to research methods of one sort or another, and while oversight is needed, it should not be so onerous as to stifle research and development. This panel will discuss practical solutions to the tensions inherent in the need for human subjects protection and the perceived over-regulation of social science and technology research by institutional review boards.

Moderator

Cheryl Crawford Watson, Human Subjects Protection Officer, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Gerald Gaes, Visiting Scientist, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Julia G. Gorey, Public Health Analyst, Division of Policy and Assurances, Office of Human Research Protections, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD

Robert L. Trestman, Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

Cathy Spatz Widom, Professor, Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY


Criminal Justice Information Sharing:
Real Time Sharing With Real Results

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Salon F
This session will focus on the latest improvements in criminal justice information sharing, including what is being done to improve information sharing among public safety agencies and how to evaluate the efficacy of those improvements. The panelists will discuss the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan, Nlets, the Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS), and the service that Global Justice XML can provide in addressing these crucial issues.

Moderators

William A. Ford, Program Manager, Research and Technology Development Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

James Patrick McCreary, Associate Deputy Director, Policy Office, Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Robert L. Chico, Program Manager, Research and Development Division, West Virginia High Tech Consortium, Fairmont, WV

Steven E. Correll, Executive Director, Nlets - The International Justice and Public Safety Information Sharing Network, Phoenix, AZ

Robin Gibson, Manager, Court Automation, Planning, and Fiscal Department, Information Technology Division, Office of State Courts Administrator, Jefferson City, MO

Pamela Scanlon, Executive Director, Automated Regional Justice Information System, San Diego, CA


Federal Death Penalty System

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Salon G
By congressional mandate, the National Institute of Justice responded to concerns about racial, ethnic, and geographic disparity in the investigation and prosecution of capital-eligible cases in the Federal judicial system. Researchers from RAND and the University of California-Berkeley will report on quantitative analyses of U.S. Attorneys recommendations and Attorney General decisions to seek the death penalty. These quantitative findings are complemented by National Opinion Research Center interviews with Federal, State, and local investigators, prosecutors, and defense attorneys who play a role in determining whether homicide cases are investigated and prosecuted in State or Federal systems. The panel offers a unique opportunity for researchers, policymakers, and other stakeholders to learn from recent studies in Federal case processing.

Moderator

Linda Truitt, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Stephen P. Klein, Senior Research Scientist, RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA

Phyllis J. Newton, Senior Research Scientist, Substance Abuse, Mental Health, and Criminal Justice Department, National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago, Washington, DC

Discussant

Barry Latzer, Professor, Department of Government, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY


Delinquency and Violence Trajectory Analyses:
How Are They Useful to Practitioners?

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Salon I
Trajectory analyses are used to compile longitudinal data in order to reduce synthesized information, making the data more useful to practitioners. This panel will review the results of various studies, including those funded by the National Institute of Justice, and make them clear and useful to practitioners. The panel will provide selected trajectory analysis findings for those involved in planning criminal justice and preventive interventions and will caution practitioners about possible misuses of trajectory analyses.

Moderator

Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

James K. Nash, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Social Work, Portland State University, Portland, OR

Alex R. Piquero, Professor, Department of Criminology, Law, and Society, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

John C. Steiger, Deputy Director, Washington State Caseload Forecast Council, Olympia, WA


Advancements in Crime Series Analysis for Identifying
an Offender's Base of Operations

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Salon IV
This panel will discuss the advancement of crime series analysis software that helps crime analysts determine a serial offender's base of operations. Currently, crime series analysis systems such as geographic profiling or algorithms use distance decay models to model criminal travel behavior, but they do not take into account any impediments from the topography or built environment that may restrict human movement. The panelists will review projects that move beyond the distance decay model, giving law enforcement a more accurate analysis of how criminals move throughout the space in which they operate.

Moderator

Thomas J. Sexton, Senior Advisor for Law Enforcement, Research and Technology Development Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC

Presenters

Mike O'Leary, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, Towson University, Towson, MD

Derek J. Paulsen, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice and Police Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY

Ronald E. Wilson, Program Manager, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC



Networking on the Terrace: Meet the Speakers
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm Presidential Suite Terrace, 12th Floor
Please join us for informal conversation with colleagues and speakers - and a refreshing icebreaker - on the hotel's beautiful outdoor terrace overlooking the Nation's Capital.

 

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Date Created: November 27, 2007