Agenda: 2009 NIJ Conference

   

Monday, June 15
8:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
8:45 a.m.

Plenary Panel: Homicide in the U.S.

Listen to the entire session.
The NIJ Conference will kick off with a blue-ribbon panel of leaders with expertise in urban issues as they relate to homicide. These experts will discuss promising approaches that have resulted in reduced violence and community empowerment.

The nation's homicide clearance rate was 91 percent in 1965 but by 2007 has dropped to 61 percent. Law enforcement attributes the decline to the rise in drug and gang-related murders, which are difficult to solve. James Fox, Ph.D., from Northeastern University, has found that homicides of young black males surged from 2002 to 2007. The increase was consistently true for every region of the country and nearly all population groupings of cities.

Many people believe the concern about homicide among at-risk youth will increase over the next decade because of current demographics. Yet homicide is dramatically decreasing in many places throughout the country. A large part of the decrease is due to strong leadership from law enforcement. Kim Ward is another example. Another key ingredient is innovation — like that used by Gary Slutkin, M.D., in Chicago—where law enforcement, city officials and the community collaborate.
Panelists:

  • James Alan Fox, The Lipman Family Professor of Criminal Justice and Professor of Law, Policy, and Society, Northeastern University
  • Gary Slutkin, Executive Director, The Chicago Project for Violence Prevention
    Watch to a short interview with Gary Slutkin (2:30)
  • M. Kim Ward, Colonel, Community Resources Bureau, Baltimore County Police Department, Towson, Md.
  • Moderator: Laurie Robinson, Acting Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice
10:15 a.m. Break
10:30 a.m. Concurrent Panels

Elder Abuse: How Much Occurs and How Do We Measure It?

Panelists will present NIJ research on elder mistreatment in noninstitutionalized adults as well as tools for measuring the financial exploitation and psychological abuse of the elderly. A recently completed telephone survey of more than 6,500 older adults living in the community provides the most accurate estimates of the prevalence and incidence of physical, sexual, financial and emotional elder abuse. A second study used state-of-the-art science methods to develop a tool that measures the financial and psychological abuse of elders.

  • Ron Acierno, Associate Professor, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, S.C.
  • Kendon Conrad, Professor, Division of Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • Georgia J. Anetzberger, Assistant Professor, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Moderator: Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Custody Evaluation in Domestic Violence Cases

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Panelists will examine practices, beliefs and recommendations of professional and custody evaluators in domestic violence cases. Panelists will discuss current NIJ studies that use both qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the impact of personal attitudes and beliefs on custody evaluation.

  • Daniel G. Saunders, Professor, School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  • Chris S. O'Sullivan, Research Consultant, New York Legal Assistance Group, New York, N.Y.
  • Dale R. Koch, Senior Judge, State of Oregon, Portland, Ore.
  • Moderator: Bethany Backes, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Using Forensic Evidence to Solve Crime

Panelists will discuss the role forensic databases play in examining and comparing evidence. Panelists will explore how forensic evidence can contribute to successful case outcomes. Findings from the follow-up study on the DNA field experiment will also be presented.

  • George Herrin, Deputy Director, Division of Forensic Sciences, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Decatur, Ga.
  • John Roman, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Joseph L. Peterson, Professor, California State University, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Moderator: Minh Nguyen, Physical Scientist, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The Internet, Cell Phone and Voice Over Internet Protocol: Legal and Privacy Issues for Criminal Justice Practitioners

Technology provides many benefits and conveniences, but it also creates new challenges. How can law enforcement prevent technology from being used to facilitate crime? How should the criminal justice community handle legal or privacy problems that arise from regulating or using technology? Practitioners will discuss the legal and implementation aspects of blocking cell phones and detecting them in correctional facilities, as well as the privacy concerns of surveillance and how criminals rely on the Internet.

  • Robert O'Leary, President of Electronic Crime Prevention & Investigations, LLC, and Director, Electronic Crime Partnership Initiative, Phillipsburg, N.J.
  • Jim Zacarelli, Captain, Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, Camp Hill, Pa.
  • Sharon Bradford Franklin, Senior Counsel, Constitution Project, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Joseph Heaps, Deputy Chief, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Foreclosures and the Connections to Crime

Panelists will discuss findings from NIJ intramural studies on the relationship between home foreclosures and crime and present recommendations on this topic. Panelists will discuss the foreclosure problem's possible longterm impact on the criminal justice system.

  • Derek J. Paulsen, Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director, Department of Criminal Justice and Police Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Ky.
  • Christopher Maxwell, Associate Dean for Research at the College of Social Science and Associate Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Ann Fulmer, Vice President of Business Relations, Interthinx, Tucker, Ga.
  • Cornelia Sorensen Sigworth, Policy Advisor, Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Chicago Ceasefire: Postplenary Session

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CeaseFire is an evidence-based, data-driven intervention designed to stop shootings and killings in high-incidence neighborhoods by directly intervening with those who are most likely to be involved in a shooting and by building support for alternatives to violence in those neighborhoods. Panel members will share their experiences “on the ground” mediating conflicts and working one-on-one with high-risk individuals.

  • Field Violence Interrupters, Chicago Project for Violence Prevention, Chicago, Ill.
  • Moderator: Candice M. Kane, Chief Operating Officer, Chicago Project for Violence Prevention, Chicago, Ill.

Closing Prisons and Reducing Costs: Challenges Faced by Correctional Administrators

Correctional administrators face decreasing budgets and a consistent flow of offenders into their institutions. Many must close prisons and decrease costs without forfeiting safety and offender services. Panelists will discuss these and other policy and practice challenges currently affecting correctional administrators.

  • Roger Werholtz, Secretary of Corrections, Kansas Department of Corrections, Topeka, Kan.
  • Patricia Caruso, Director, Michigan Department of Corrections, Lansing, Mich.
  • Jeffrey Morenoff, Associate Professor of Sociology and Research Associate Professor, Populations Studies Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  • Adam Gelb, Director of the Public Safety Performance Project, Pew Center on the States, Washington, D.C.
    Watch a short interview with Adam Gelb (2:25)
  • Moderator: Marie Garcia, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

New Perspectives on Policing: The Harvard Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety

The Harvard Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety brings together top police executives and academic professionals to explore law enforcement issues in a post-Sept. 11 world. Panelists will focus on topics that have been discussed during the Executive Session meetings, such as how the current economic situation influences police practices, the changing nature and deployment of police detectives, and the use of technology in understanding and solving crime.

  • Anthony Batts, Chief, Long Beach Police Department, Long Beach, Calif.
  • Anthony Braga, Senior Research Associate, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
  • David Weisburd, Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice and Director, Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, and Distinguished Professor of Administration of Justice, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
  • Discussant: Darrel Stephens, Director of State and Local Programs, Johns Hopkins University School of Education, Baltimore, Md., and Former Chief, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, Charlotte, N.C.
  • Moderator: Christine Cole, Executive Director, Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
12:00 p.m.

Lunch and Keynote Address:

The Honorable Eric H. Holder Jr., Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice
Read his remarks.

Clea Koff, forensic anthropologist and author of The Bone Woman: A Forensic Anthropologist's Search for Truth in the Graves of Rwanda, Bosnia, Croatia, and Kosovo.

1:45 p.m. Concurrent Panels

Domestic Violence Shelters: The Experience of the Survivor

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Panelists will present findings from a comprehensive study of domestic violence shelters in eight states. Data were collected from 3,410 residents in 215 domestic violence shelters — 81 percent of the shelters. The first of its kind, this descriptive study seeks to fill a gap in current knowledge about the needs and experiences of domestic violence survivors who turn to shelters for help and the type of help they receive. Implications for policy and programming will also be addressed.

  • Eleanor Lyon, Director of Institute for Violence Prevention and Reduction and Associate Professor in Residence, School of Social Work, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn.
  • Marylouise Kelley, Director, Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.
  • Anne Menard, Director, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, Harrisburg, Pa.
  • Moderator: Angela Moore, Acting Deputy Director for Research and Evaluation, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

International Trends in Fighting Child Pornography

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This panel brings together American and European practitioners using innovative approaches to thwart the sharing of child pornography online. The panel will highlight two efforts. The first, which NIJ's International Center is evaluating, is a European multilateral project that teams criminal investigators with international nongovernmental organizations and Internet service providers (ISPs) to block access to child pornography sites. The second effort seeks to prevent child pornographers from accessing credit card and other online payment systems. The panelists will include representatives from Norway, Sweden and the United States.

  • Per-Ake Wecksell, Detective Inspector, Swedish National Criminal Police, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Catherine J. Cummings, Executive Director, Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography, International Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Alexandria, Va.
  • Bjørn-Erik Ludvigsen, Police Superintendent, National Criminal Investigation Service, Oslo, Norway
  • Moderator: John T. Picarelli, Social Science Analyst, International Center, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Bringing Forensic Testing to the Crime Scene

Panelists will present research on miniaturized DNA testing devices that could potentially be used for real-time analysis in the field. Evaluation and validation studies conducted by crime laboratory practitioners will be presented, followed by a discussion of the potential impact on forensic and intelligence applications.

  • Susan Greenspoon, Forensic Molecular Biologist of the Virginia Department of Forensic Science and Affiliate Research Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Va.
  • Debbie Figarelli, DNA Technical Leader, National Forensic Science Technology Center, Largo, Fla.
  • Cecelia Crouse, Chief Scientific Officer of the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office Crime Laboratory and Manager, Forensic Biology Unit, West Palm Beach, Fla.
  • John Paul Jones II, Innovation Technology Advisor, Innovation and Systems Defense Engineering Office, Research and Development Enterprise, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, U.S. Department of Defense, Fort Belvoir, Va.
  • Moderator: Tom Martin, Senior Investigator and Member in Charge of the Troop K Forensic Unit, New York State Police, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

Are Conducted Energy Devices Safe? Interim Findings From the In-Custody Death Study

Questions surround the safety of conducted energy devices (CEDs). Because gaps remain in the body of knowledge on the effects of CEDs, NIJ commissioned a medical study to address whether the devices can cause or contribute to a person's death and, if so, in what ways. Panelists will present the interim results of the In-Custody Death Study and other NIJ-funded studies on CED safety.

  • William Bozeman, Associate Director of Research and Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C.
  • Randy Hanzlick, Professor of Forensic Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, and Chief Medical Examiner for Fulton County, Atlanta, Ga.
  • David M. Jenkins, Research Associate, Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pa.
  • Moderator: John Morgan, Deputy Director for Science and Technology, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Geographic Tools to Analyze Crime

This panel will highlight NIJ's work in developing software that incorporates geographical factors to help identify and understand patterns of crime. One program, CrimeStat IV, analyzes crime patterns based on geography. Another estimates patterns as the urban environment changes. A third software program calculates the probability of repeat victimization for properties close to each other. Panelists will also discuss implementing geographic analyses of crime and the issues of operationalizing theories in software programs.

  • Ned Levine, Director, Ned Levine & Associates, Houston, Texas
  • George F. Rengert, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Jay Lee, Professor and Chair, Geography Department, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
  • Mike O'Leary, Director of the Center for Applied Information Technology and Associate Professor, Departments of Mathematics and Computer and Information Sciences, Towson University, Towson, Md.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

What Works in Offender Supervision

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This panel will highlight findings from NIJ projects that evaluated strategies to enhance the supervision of offenders in the community. Researchers will discuss the effectiveness of fair, swift and certain sanctions for high-risk probationers in the Hawaii HOPE program. Panelists will also provide empirical evidence on the effectiveness of electronic monitoring — including the use of GPS tracking — for medium- and high-risk offenders on supervision and upon completion of their supervision sentence. The effect of reduced caseloads, combined with evidence-based practices on recidivism in three jurisdictions will also be discussed.

  • Bill Bales, Associate Professor, College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fla.
  • Angela Hawken, Assistant Professor of Economics and Policy Analysis, School of Public Policy, Pepperdine University, Malibu, Calif.
  • The Honorable Steven S. Alm, Judge, First Circuit Court, Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Moderator: Marlene Beckman, Senior Policy Advisor to the Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Alternative Sentencing Policies for Drug Offenders

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Under Kansas Senate Bill 123, nonviolent drug-possession offenders are sentenced to mandatory drug abuse treatment in lieu of prison. A sentencing and corrections practitioner will provide background on the bill and discuss changes relating to its introduction. NIJ-funded researchers will present findings from a study, which examined recidivism, as well as the program's cost effectiveness.

  • Roger Werholtz, Secretary of Corrections, Kansas Department of Corrections, Topeka, Kan.
  • Don Stemen, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • Andres F. Rengifo, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo.
  • Moderator: Linda Truitt, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Results from Systematic Reviews of Research on Bullying, Mentoring, and the Children of Prisoners

Panelists will present results from systematic reviews of bullying intervention and mentoring programs, and the behavioral and  mental health effects on children who have parents in prison. The panelists will describe also how they conducted the reviews in collecting data, conducting meta-analyses and assembling reports. Each of these reviews was conducted through the Campbell Collaboration.

  • David P. Farrington, Professor of Psychological Criminology, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.
  • Maria M. Ttofi, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.
  • Patrick H. Tolan, Director of the Institute for Juvenile Research and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • Moderator: Thomas E. Feucht, Executive Senior Science Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
3:15 p.m. Break
3:30 p.m. Concurrent Panels

Crime and the Transition From Adolescence to Adulthood

Panelists will discuss NIJ research on the long-term consequences of delinquency and how youth fare as they leave out-of-home care. One study follows 732 youth who were formerly placed in out-of-home care to understand how experiences within the child welfare system influence their offending behavior as they make the transition into adulthood. A second study follows 1,000 formerly incarcerated juveniles into early adulthood to document their involvement in the criminal justice system and the perpetration of child abuse and neglect.

  • Gretchen Cusick, Senior Researcher, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • Rebecca Colman, Research Scientist, New York State Office of Children and Family Services, Rensselaer, N.Y.
  • Brad Bryant, Executive Director, People Places, Inc., Staunton, Va.
  • Moderator: Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Sexual Assault and Underserved Populations

Panelists will focus on two NIJ studies. The first study examines adolescents' use of medical services after a sexual assault, focusing on which cases make it through the system and how the sexual assault nurse examiner or sexual assault response team affects victims' participation in prosecution. A second study examines the prevalence, nature and reporting of sexual assault at historically black colleges and universities.

  • Rebecca Campbell, Professor of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Chris Krebs, Senior Research Social Scientist, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Jennifer Grove, Prevention Outreach Coordinator, National Sexual Violence Resource Center, Enola, Pa.
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Forensic Science Demonstrations / (Poster Session)

DNA researchers will present their tools and recent findings through technology demonstrations and posters. Crime laboratory practitioners who receive support under NIJ's DNA backlog reduction and capacity enhancement programs will present posters on such topics as success stories, improved laboratory efficiency and technology solutions to routinely encountered challenges. The session will also provide a forum for interaction and discussion among researchers, practitioners and conference participants with an interest in forensic science.

RESEARCHERS
  • Jack Ballantyne, Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, and Associate Director, National Center for Forensic Science, Orlando, Fla.
  • John R. Battista, Mary Lou Applewhite Professor of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, La.
  • John M. Butler, Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • Cassandra D. Calloway, Assistant Staff Scientist, Children's Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Oakland, Calif.
  • Christian B. Carson, Associate Laboratory Director, Paternity Testing Corporation, Columbia, Mo.
  • Michael Coble, Chief, Research Section, Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rockville, Md.
  • Tracey Dawson Cruz, Assistant Professor, Department of Forensic Science and Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Va.
  • Phillip B. Danielson, Professor of Molecular Biology, University of Denver, and Science Advisor, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Colo.
  • Robert Driscoll, Research Scientist, Bode Technology Group, Lorton, Va.
  • Thomas A. Hall, Director, Development, Ibis Biosciences, Carlsbad, Calif.
  • Micah Halpern, Staff Scientist, Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo.
  • Erin Hanson, Senior Biologist, National Center for Forensic Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • Shane Hoffmann, Forensic Scientist, Biology/DNA Unit, Michigan State Police, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Sree Kanthaswamy, Assistant Research Geneticist, University of California, Davis, Davis, Calif.
  • Brian M. Kemp, Assistant Professor, Washington State University, Pullman, Wash.
  • Milko Kermekchiev, Chief Scientist, DNA Polymerase Technology, St. Louis, Mo.
  • Kenneth K. Kidd, Professor, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.
  • Greggory S. LaBerge, Scientific Director, Denver Police Department, Denver, Colo.
  • Jared Latiolais, Research Scientist, Bode Technology Group, Lorton, Va.
  • Henry K. Lin, Wigner Fellow, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.
  • Peng Liu, Graduate Student Researcher, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, Calif.
  • Bruce R. McCord, Professor, Florida International University, Miami, Fla.
  • Daniel Mueth, Director of Research, Arryx Inc., Chicago, Ill.
  • John Nelson, Principal Investigator, GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, N.Y.
  • Carmen Reedy, Graduate Student, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.
  • Jennifer Reynolds, Vice President, Akonni Biosystems, Inc., Frederick, Md.
  • Margaret Schwartz, Senior Forensic Chemist, Vermont Forensic Laboratory, Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, Vt.
  • Donald Siegel, Research Supervisor, Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Forensic Biology, Office of Chief Medical Examiner, New York, N.Y.
  • Linda D. Strausbaugh, Professor of Genetics and Genomics and Director, Center for Applied Genetics and Technology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn.
  • Eugene Tan, Vice President of Product Development, Network Biosystems, Woburn, Mass.
  • Alicia Timm, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Linton von Beroldingen, Criminalist Manager, California Department of Justice, Richmond, Calif.
  • Cynthia Zeller, Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Forensic Science, Towson University, Towson, Md.
Practitioners (Agency Names)
  • Alabama
    Alabama Department
    of Forensic Sciences
  • Alaska
    Alaska Department
    of Public Safety
  • Arizona
    Arizona Criminal Justice
    Commission
    Arizona Department
    of Public Safety
    City of Mesa
    City of Phoenix
    City of Scottsdale
    City of Tucson
  • Arkansas
    Arkansas State Crime Laboratory
  • California
    Alameda County
    California Department of Justice
    City and County of San Francisco
    City of Los Angeles
    City of Oakland
    Contra Costa County
    Kern County
    Los Angeles County
    Orange County
    Sacramento County
    San Bernardino County
    San Diego County
    San Diego Police Department
    San Mateo County
    Santa Clara County
    Ventura County
  • Colorado
    City and County of Denver
    Colorado Department
    of Public Safety
  • Connecticut
    Department of Public Safety
  • Delaware
    Delaware Health and
    Social Services
  • Florida
    Broward Sheriff's Office
    DNA Laboratory
    Florida Department of Law
    Enforcement
    Indian River Crime Laboratory
    Miami-Dade County
    Palm Beach County Sheriff's
    Office
  • Georgia
    Georgia Bureau of Investigation
  • Hawaii
    City and County of Honolulu
  • Idaho
    Idaho State Police
  • Illinois
    DuPage County Sheriff's Office
    Illinois State Police
    Northeastern Illinois Regional
    Crime Laboratory
  • Indiana
    Indiana State Police
    Indianapolis-Marion County
    Forensic Services Agency
  • Kansas
    Johnson County
    Kansas Bureau of Investigation
    Sedgwick County
  • Kentucky
    Commonwealth of Kentucky
  • Louisiana
    Acadiana Criminalistics
    Laboratory
    Louisiana State Police
  • Maine
    Maine Department
    of Public Safety
  • Maryland
    Anne Arundel County
    Baltimore County
    City of Baltimore
    Maryland State Police
    Montgomery County
    Prince George's County
  • Massachusetts
    City of Boston
    Massachusetts State Police
  • Michigan
    State of Michigan
  • Minnesota
    Hennepin County
    Minnesota Department
    of Public Safety
  • Mississippi
    Mississippi Department
    of Public Safety
  • Missouri
    Board of Police Commissioners
    Missouri State Highway Patrol
    St. Charles County
    St. Louis County
    St. Louis Metropolitan
    Police Department
  • Montana
    Montana Department of Justice
  • Nebraska
    Nebraska State Patrol
  • Nevada
    Las Vegas Metropolitan
    Police Department
    Washoe County Sheriff's Office
  • New Hampshire
    New Hampshire Department
    of Safety
  • New Jersey
    New Jersey Department
    of Law and Public Safety
  • New Mexico
    City of Albuquerque
    State of New Mexico
  • New York
    City of New York
    Erie County
    Monroe County
    Nassau County
    New York State Police
    Onondaga County
    Suffolk County
    Westchester County
  • North Carolina
    City of Charlotte
    North Carolina Department
    of Crime Control
    and Public Safety
  • North Dakota
    State of North Dakota
  • Ohio
    City of Columbus
    City of Mansfield
    Cuyahoga County Coroner's Office
    Hamilton County
    Lake County
    Montgomery County
    State of Ohio Office
    of the Attorney General
  • Oklahoma
    Oklahoma State Bureau
    of Investigation
  • Oregon
    Oregon State Police
  • Pennsylvania
    Allegheny County
    City of Philadelphia
    Pennsylvania State Police
  • Puerto Rico
    Instituto de Ciencias Forenses
  • Rhode Island
    Rhode Island Public Safety Grant
    Administration Office
  • South Carolina
    Richland County
    South Carolina Law
    Enforcement Division
  • South Dakota
    Office of the Attorney General
  • Tennessee
    Tennessee Bureau of
    Investigation
  • Texas
    City of Austin
    Bexar County
    Dallas County
    Harris County
    State of Texas
    University of North Texas Health
    Science Center at Fort Worth
  • Utah
    Utah Department of
    Public Safety
  • Vermont
    Vermont Department
    of Public Safety
  • Virginia
    Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Washington
    Washington State Patrol
  • Washington, D.C.
    Metropolitan Police Department
  • West Virginia
    Marshall University Research
    Corporation
    West Virginia State Police
  • Wisconsin
    Wisconsin Department of Justice
  • Wyoming
    Wyoming Office of the
    Attorney General

To Protect and to Serve: Policing in an Age of Terrorism

Panelists will discuss a new book that explores how the organization and work of law enforcement agencies change in an age of terrorism. Growing out of work commissioned by NIJ and Israel's Ministry of Public Security, the book explores questions such as how different is terrorism from “ordinary” crime? Should law enforcement agencies develop specific capacity for terrorism intelligence-gathering? What trade-offs do the police face in conducting surveillance in minority and other communities?

  • Gary LaFree, Director of the National Center for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism and Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
  • David Weisburd, Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice and Director, Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, and Distinguished Professor of Administration of Justice, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
  • Badi Hasisi, Lecturer, Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Geoffrey P. Alpert, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.
  • Moderator: Thomas E. Feucht, Executive Senior Science Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Preventing Violence and Aggression in Schools

The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, a component of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, funded a violence prevention project at 37 schools in 4 states. Panelists will examine the efficacy of universal and targeted interventions designed to reduce aggression and violence in schools.

  • Patrick H. Tolan, Director of the Institute for Juvenile Research and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • Albert Farrell, Professor of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Va.
  • Pamela Orpinas, Professor, Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga.
  • Thomas R. Simon, Deputy Associate Director for Science, Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, Atlanta, Ga.
  • Moderator: Patrick Clark, Senior Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Prison Rape: Research on Prevalence and Prevention

Prior to the passage of the Prison Rape Elimination Act in 2003, there was little knowledge about what state departments of corrections had done to combat prison rape and make institutions safer for both inmates and staff. Since then, NIJ and other federal agencies have engaged in programs and research to better understand and address the problem. Along with prevalence estimates, panelists will discuss the effectiveness of using radio frequency identification technology in a correctional setting and the development of an instrument to identify safety strengths and weaknesses in prisons and jails.

  • Paige Harrison, Statistician, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Barbara Owen, Professor of Criminology, California State University-Fresno, Fresno, Calif.
  • Nancy G. La Vigne, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Marie Garcia, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Innovations in Specialized Courts: Moving Beyond Drug Courts

Specialized court programs have expanded beyond drug courts to address other social issues. Researchers will present findings from a multisite evaluation of mental health courts and from a national portrait of domestic violence courts and a veteran's court programs. Available research on specialized courts will also be summarized.

  • Allison Redlich, Assistant Professor, School of Criminal Justice, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, N.Y.
  • Melissa Labriola, Principal Research Associate, Center for Court Innovation, New York, N.Y.
  • Robert Russell Jr., Associate Judge, Buffalo City Court, Buffalo, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Bernie Auchter, Senior Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Designer Amphetamines: Drug Use, Forensics and Law Enforcement

Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are popular worldwide, and new “designer” drugs emerge regularly in the United States. Researchers will discuss an NIJ-funded project to develop and validate forensic techniques that screen and confirm new ATS drugs. Representatives from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration will present data on drug use and consequences. A U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration analyst will examine trends in use and trafficking.

  • Sarah Kerrigan, Director, Forensic Science Program, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas
  • Kathy Poneleit, Director, Drug Abuse Warning Network, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Md.
  • Susan M. Carr, Deputy Chief, Drug and Chemical Evaluation Section, Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Frances J. Scott, Physical Scientist, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
Tuesday, June 16
8:30 a.m. Poster Session Breakfast
9:45 a.m. Break
10:00 a.m.

Plenary Panel: What Works in Probation and Parole

Listen to the entire session.
How can we prevent reoffending and reduce costs? Research points to a number of solutions. At the Tuesday plenary, Judge Steven Alm from Hawaii will describe his successes with hard-core drug offenders. “Swift and sure” is his motto. West Virginia Cabinet Secretary James W. Spears will discuss the issues from his state's perspective, and Adam Gelb, Director of the Pew Charitable Trust's Public Safety Performance Project, will lend a national overview. Pamela Lattimore, Ph.D., will describe research that has found success with reentry planning that happens while a person is still in prison and continues when the person is released into the community.

  • The Honorable Steven S. Alm, Judge, First Circuit Court, Honolulu, Hawaii
    Watch a short interview with the Honorable Steven S. Alm (1:54)
  • Harold Clarke, Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Correction, Milford, Mass.
  • Pamela K. Lattimore, Principal Scientist, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
    Watch a short interview with Pamela K. Lattimore (2:38)
  • James W. Spears, Cabinet Secretary, West Virginia Department of Military Affairs and Public Safety, Charleston, W.Va.
  • Panelist and Moderator: Adam Gelb, Director of the Public Safety Performance Project, Pew Center on the States, Washington, D.C.
11:30 a.m. Lunch on own
1:00 p.m. Concurrent Panels

Violence in Schools: What Students Know and What They Do About It

Panelists will discuss a study conducted by the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Secret Service on what students knew prior to a violent act on a school campus. Findings show that many of the acts might have been prevented if outreach efforts had been in place encouraging students to notify school officials.

  • William Modzeleski, Acting Assistant Deputy Secretary, Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C.
  • Georgeann DiCaprio, Director, Investigative Research, Hillard Heintze, LLC, Chicago, Ill.
  • Moderator: Patrick Clark, Senior Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Terrorism Studies: Finding and Applying the Best Research

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In the post-Sept. 11 era, criminal justice and homeland security professionals have been bombarded with a flood of studies on terrorism. Some of the best researchers in the field provide a practical session on evaluating terrorism studies. What should the inquisitive professional look for when presented with different methods? How can professionals publish what they see and engage experts in the field?

  • Michael Kenney, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Fellow, International Center for the Study of Terrorism, Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg, Pa.
    Watch a short interview with Michael Kenney, Ph.D. (1:48)
  • Laura Dugan, Associate Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
  • Richard Troy, Department of Taoiseach (Prime Minister), Dublin, Ireland
  • Moderator: John T. Picarelli, Social Science Analyst, International Center, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Sexual Assault: Obtaining DNA From Evidence Collected up to a Week Later

Technological advances have made it possible to detect male DNA in evidentiary samples collected several days after a sexual act has taken place. Panelists will present the research that has led to these findings, followed by a discussion of the potential impact of this work from the perspectives of the sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) and the crime laboratory communities.

  • Jack Ballantyne, Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, and Associate Director for Research, National Center for Forensic Science, Orlando, Fla.
  • Pat Speck, Assistant Professor and Public Health Nursing Option Coordinator, College of Nursing, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn.
  • Mechthild Prinz, Director, Department of Forensic Biology, Office of Chief Medical Examiner, New York, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Lois A. Tully, Deputy Chief, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Identifying the Missing: The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System

This panel will present an overview of the development and capabilities of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System. Panelists will provide examples of key system functions, case input and detailed searches. Presenters will also discuss real-world examples of the data needed to increase the likelihood of matching cases.

  • Randy Hanzlick, Professor of Forensic Pathology, Emory University, and Chief Medical Examiner for Fulton County, Atlanta, Ga.
  • Carla Proudfoot, Director of Programs, Center for Missing Children, Maryland State Police, Columbia, Md.
  • B.J. Spamer, Forensic Case Manager, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Alexandria, Va.
  • Debra Culberson, Victim Advocate, Blanchester, Ohio
  • Moderator: Danielle Weiss, Senior Forensic Analyst (contractor), Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The Impact of Local Geography on Crime

Panelists will examine why crimes occur in some neighborhoods but not in others and discuss the significant role local geography plays in influencing people's perceptions of crime.

  • David Weisburd, Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice and Director, Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, and Distinguished Professor of Administration of Justice, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
  • John R. Hipp, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminology, Law and Society, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, Calif.
  • Caterina Roman, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Daniel Bibel, Director, Crime Reporting Unit, Massachusetts State Police, Milford, Mass.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Incarceration and Relationships: Reentry Issues for Men and Women in Prison

Incarceration affects relationships between intimate partners and among parents and children. However, little institutional support is provided to assist inmates in maintaining these relationships or transitioning back to their families upon release. Panelists will discuss an NIJ study on reentry issues for women, focus on their accounts of the pathways to crime, their incarceration experiences and the process of reintegration and desistance or recidivism. Panelists will also discuss the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' national evaluation of the Responsible Fatherhood, Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Re-Entering Fathers and Their Partners.

  • Christine Lindquist, Senior Research Sociologist, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Jennifer Cobbina, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Carol Shapiro, President and Founder, Family Justice, New York, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Christine Crossland, Senior Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Prosecuting and Adjudicating Intimate Partner Violence

Panelists will discuss two NIJ studies. The first conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, looked at the prosecution of intimate partner violence cases in Kalamazoo, Mich., from 2000-2003. The second study examined the batterer intervention system in California.

  • Catherine Cerulli, Director of the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization and Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, N.Y.
  • Dag MacLeod, Manager, Office of Court Research, Administrative Office of the Courts, Judicial Council of California, San Francisco, Calif.
  • Jennifer Long, Attorney, Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, Enola, Pa.
  • Moderator: Bernie Auchter, Senior Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Advances in Digital Forensics

Law enforcement continues to face challenges in analyzing and reporting digital evidence. Panelists will present findings from several NIJ-funded projects that have made advances in digital forensics.

  • Frank Adelstein, Technical Director, Computer Security, Architecture Technology Corp., Ithaca, N.Y.
  • Victor Fay-Wolfe, Professor of Computer Science and Director, Digital Forensics Center, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, R.I.
  • James Thompson, Assistant Director, Broome County Government Security Division, Computer Analysis and Technical Services Unit, Binghamton, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Martin Novak, Program Manager, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
2:30 p.m. Break
2:45 p.m. Concurrent Panels

Is It Old Age, Abuse or Homicide? Using Forensic Markers and Technology to Detect Elder Abuse and Neglect

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Panelists will present results from NIJ-funded studies on bruising and CT scanning and discuss the important role of forensic information and technology in effectively investigating violent crimes against the elderly.

  • Aileen Wiglesworth, Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, Calif.
  • Barry Daly, Professor of Radiology and Vice Chair for Research, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.
  • Cherie Hill, Detective, Anaheim Police Department, Anaheim, Calif.
  • Moderator: Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Combating Domestic Trafficking in Persons: How Task Forces and Local Law Enforcement Respond

Panelists will discuss congressionally mandated work by NIJ and the Bureau of Justice Statistics to identify severe forms of trafficking and commercial sex acts in the United States. One study explores human trafficking experiences among a random sample of 60 counties. A second study examines the response of federally funded task forces.

  • Tim Mulcahy, Senior Research Scientist, National Opinion Research Center, Bethesda, Md.
  • Amy Farrell, Assistant Professor, College of Criminal Justice, and Associate Director, Institute on Race and Justice, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass.
  • U.S. State Department Representative
  • Moderator: Tracey Kyckelhahn, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Making Sense of the DNA Backlog

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Panelists will present findings from two NIJ studies that examined the DNA backlog in law enforcement agencies and crime labs. Panelists will discuss research findings related to new and potential time- and cost-saving approaches.

  • Kevin Lothridge, Chief Executive Officer, National Forensic Science Technology Center, Largo, Fla.
  • Kevin J. Strom, Senior Research Scientist, Crime, Violence, and Justice Research Program, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Greg Matheson, Director, Los Angeles Police Department Criminalistics Laboratory, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Moderator: Mark Nelson, Senior Program Manager, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Police Use of Force: Translating Research Into Practice

Police agencies rely on use-of-force policies to establish parameters for the application of force and to offer explicit direction to officers. Panelists will discuss how NIJ research findings can be effectively translated into practice.

  • Bruce Taylor, Director of Research, Police Executive Research Forum, Washington, D.C.
  • Bryan Vila, Professor of Criminal Justice, Washington State University, Spokane, Wash.
  • Moderator: Brett Chapman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Geographic Aspects of Sex Offender Residency Restriction Laws

Dozens of states and hundreds of localities have adopted measures to restrict where registered sex offenders can live. Typically, the laws are intended to protect children by limiting offenders' access to locations where children congregate. Panelists will examine the impact of current and proposed sex offender residency restriction laws from a geographical perspective. Topics will include the lack of available housing and housing instability for registered offenders; problems associated with concentrating them in limited residential areas; increased travel for offenders; and limited access to jobs, treatment, and supportive family and friends.

  • Kristen M. Zgoba, Supervisor of Research and Evaluation and Co-Chairperson, Department of Research and Review Board, New Jersey Department of Corrections, Trenton, N.J.
  • J.C. Barnes, Doctoral Student, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fla.
  • Bonnie Dumanis, District Attorney, San Diego County District Attorney's Office, San Diego, Calif.
  • Tom Casady, Chief, Lincoln Police Department, Lincoln, Neb.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Criminal Background Checks and Hiring Ex-Offenders

Panelists will explore the effects criminal background checks have on hiring ex-offenders and discuss when it is statistically “safe” for an employer to overlook a criminal record because, based on the age of the offender, the crime and time since the offense, the individual poses no greater risk of offending than a peer without a criminal record.

  • Alfred Blumstein, University Professor and J. Erik Jonsson Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Watch an interview with Alfred Blumstein and Kiminori Nakamura (13:05)
  • Diane Williams, President and Chief Executive Officer, Safer Foundation, Chicago, Ill.
  • Richard Morris, Workforce Development Specialist, Division of Youth Services, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, D.C.
  • Kiminori Nakamura, Doctoral Student, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • Moderator: Marilyn C. Moses, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Judicial Security: Working to Prevent Another Oklahoma City Bombing

Panelists will examine court security issues that arose after the bombing of the federal courthouse in Oklahoma City. Panelists will discuss securing court facilities and implementing technologies and programs to detect and deter violent acts.

  • Thomas Galgon, Administrator for the National Center for Judicial Security and Chief Inspector, U.S. Marshals Service, Washington, D.C.
  • Charles Sebesta, Training Coordinator, Sheriffs Association of Texas, Austin, Texas
  • Travis Robinson, Lieutenant, New Hanover Sheriff's Office, Castle Hayne, N.C.
  • Moderator: Michael O'Shea, Program Manager, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Reading License Plates in Real Time

Practitioners will explore the capabilities and applications of automated license plate readers (ALPR), focusing on policy issues and the challenges faced during implementation. Panelists will also discuss the creation of an interoperable standard for ALPR and technical reviews of fixed and mobile systems.

  • Heather Ruzbasan Cotter, Senior Program Manager, International Association of Chiefs of Police, Alexandria, Va.
  • Kurt Schmid, Executive Director, Chicago High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program, Chicago, Ill.
  • Dale Stockton, Program Manager, Road Runner, Automated Regional Justice Information System, San Diego, Calif.
  • Dominic LaMar, Computer Scientist, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic, North Charleston, S.C.
  • Moderator: William A. Ford, Chief, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
4:15 p.m. Break
4:30 p.m. Special Session

What Works to Reduce Gang Violence and Drug Markets: The National Network for Safe Communities

Presenters are launching the National Network for Safe Communities based on what they have learned during 15 years of action research about reducing violence. The philosophy and techniques of the initiative build on research involving law enforcement practitioners, community actors, social service providers and scholars. At this special plenary, panelists will explain how they are reducing crime and incarceration and strengthening communities and promoting racial reconciliation. The National Network members are resetting the way we deal with gang violence and drug markets.

  • Jeremy Travis, President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice and Co-Chair, National Network for Safe Communities, New York, N.Y.
  • David M. Kennedy, Director of the Center for Crime Prevention and Control, John Jay College of Criminal Justice and Co-Chair, National Network for Safe Communities, New York, N.Y.
  • Glenn Ivey, State’s Attorney, Office of the State’s Attorney for Prince George’s County, Upper Marlboro, Md.
  • Greg Baker, Project Manager, Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Teny Gross, Executive Director, Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence, Providence, R.I.
  • James Fealy, Police Chief, High Point Police Department, High Point, N.C.
  • Meg Reiss, Assistant District Attorney, Nassau County District Attorney’s Office, Long Island, N.Y.
  • Tracey Meares, Professor of Law, Yale Law School, New Haven, Conn., and Project Safe Neighborhoods Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • Paul Seave, State Director, Gang and Youth Violence Policy, Office of the Governor, Sacramento, Calif.
  • Sherman Mason, Reverend, Greater New Hope Baptist Church, High Point, N.C.
  • Thomas Streicher, Chief of Police, Cincinnati Police Department, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Eddison Bramble, President 100 Black Men of Long Island, Inc, Long Island, N.Y.
  • Sherman W. Mason II, Senior Pastor of Greater New Hope Baptist Church and Chaplain, High Point Police Department, High Point, N.C.
  • Kathleen Rice, District Attorney, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.
  • Thomas H. Streicher Jr., Chief, Cincinnati Police Department, Cincinnati, Ohio
Wednesday, June 17
8:30 a.m. Concurrent Panels

The Hague Convention: Research on Domestic Violence and International Child Abduction

Panelists will discuss an NIJ-funded study that aims to better understand the experiences of women who escaped abusive relationships and came to the United States with their children. As a result, these women became involved in legal disputes under the 1996 Hague Convention.

  • Jeffrey Edleson, Professor and Director of Research, School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, and Director, Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse, St. Paul, Minn.
  • Taryn Lindhorst, Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.
  • Bill Dressel, President, National Judicial College, Reno, Nev.
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Violence Against Women in Minority Communities

Panelists will examine current research on sexual assault among Latinas as well as justice system responses to intimate partner violence for women of Indian, Pakistani and Filipina descent. The first study explores the rate of victimization and use of social services among Latinas along with satisfaction with services and suggestions for improvement. The study also measures cultural factors that affect sexually victimized Latinas and psychosocial outcomes associated with victimization. The second study, which focuses on Asian communities, assesses life course experience with intimate partner violence and contact with the criminal justice system to identify factors that promote or hinder effective interventions in these communities.

  • Carlos Cuevas, Assistant Professor, College of Criminal Justice, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass.
  • Sonia Parras-Konrad, Founder, MUNA Legal Clinic, Des Moines, Iowa
  • Chiara Sabina, Assistant Professor, School of Behavioral Sciences and Education, Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg, Pa.
  • Mieko Yoshihama, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  • Moderator: Bethany Backes, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Beyond Traditional DNA Markers: Predicting a Person's Appearance From DNA Evidence

Panelists will discuss advances in DNA technology that make it possible to use DNA evidence to predict an individual's age, ancestry, facial features, eye color and other phenotypic traits. A discussion of the impact on law enforcement and potential privacy issues will follow.

  • Jack Ballantyne, Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, and Associate Director for Research, National Center for Forensic Science, Orlando, Fla.
  • Mark Shriver, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Genetics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa.
  • Panelist and Moderator: Anjali Swienton, President and Chief Executive Officer, SciLawForensics, Ltd., Germantown, Md.

The View From the Street: Police Leaders Share Their Perspectives on Urgent Research and Policy Issues Facing Law Enforcement in 2009 and Beyond

Panelists will share their views on urgent and emerging law enforcement issues and how they think research can inform their policies and practices. They will also describe and react to several surveys conducted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police on the policy concerns of law enforcement leaders.

  • John R. Batiste, Chief of Washington State Patrol, Olympia, Wash.
  • Russell Laine, Chief of Police in Algonquin, Ill., and President, International Association of Chiefs of Police, Alexandria, Va.
  • Ronald Ruecker, Assistant Director of the Office of Law Enforcement Coordination, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D.C., and Immediate Past President, International Association of Chiefs of Police, Alexandria, Va.
  • Mark Marshall, Chief of Police in Smithfield, Va., and Second Vice President, International Association of Chiefs of Police, Alexandria, Va.
  • Kathy Perez, Chief of Police, Bowie, Md.
  • Nola Joyce, Chief Administrative Officer, Philadelphia Police Department, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Moderator: Ronal W. Serpas, Chief of Police in Nashville, Tenn., and Co-Chair, Research Advisory Committee, International Association of Chiefs of Police, Alexandria, Va.

Protecting Public Spaces With Closed-Circuit Television Systems

Video surveillance is ever-present in today's society, with cameras in police cars, private-industry and in some jurisdictions, some that are publicly owned and maintained. Questions are being raised about the ethics and legality of such surveillance. From the video analyst's viewpoint, there are also significant issues surrounding interoperability and the efficacy of retrieving useful information. Panelists will discuss the use of video surveillance from the prosecutorial, video analytic and policy perspectives.

  • Scott Kuntz, Deputy Sheriff, Dane County Sheriff's Office, Madison, Wis.
  • Miles Brissette, District Attorney, Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney's Office, Fort Worth, Texas
  • Mitch Cunningham, Director of Information Support and Analysis Division and Captain, Montgomery County (Md.) Police Department, Rockville, Md.
  • Moderator: Frances J. Scott, Physical Scientist, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Promising Technologies and Tools for Correctional Facilities

This panel will examine NIJ technology projects that provide enhanced operational and managerial support to corrections officials. Panelists will discuss the effectiveness and technical merits of deploying active radio frequency identification in the correctional setting. They will also explore the development of the Correctional Operational Trend Analysis System, a Web-based system that uses crime mapping/GIS technology and statistical trend analysis to enable correctional managers to pinpoint potential trouble spots. Finally, the panel will discuss the development of Field Search, a software application that allows nontechnical personnel to quickly and efficiently search a parolee's computer and create a detailed report of their findings.

  • Lois Davis, Senior Health Policy Researcher, RAND Corp., Santa Monica, Calif.
  • Linda McInnis, Project Manager, Office of Information Technology, Florida Department of Corrections, Tallahassee, Fla.
  • Joe Russo, Assistant Director, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Rocky Mountain, Denver, Colo.
  • Moderator: Jack Harne, Physical Scientist, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
10:00 a.m. Break
10:15 a.m. Concurrent Panels

Stalking: What We Know and What We Can Do About It

This panel will feature the results of the Bureau of Justice Statistics' national survey on stalking, the largest survey on this crime to date. An expert on stalking will discuss how the data compare with experiences in the field and will explore approaches to preventing and responding to stalking incidents. A prosecutor will present a case study and offer the criminal justice perspective on how we can better hold stalking offenders accountable.

  • Katrina Baum, Senior Statistician, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Shannan Catalano, Statistician, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Michelle Garcia, Director, Stalking Resource Center, National Center for Victims of Crime, Washington, D.C.
  • Marc Guillory, Assistant District Attorney, San Francisco District Attorney's Office, San Francisco, Calif.
  • Moderator: Kristina Rose, Acting Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The Future of Forensic Science: Findings From the National Academy of Science Study

In February 2009, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released the report "Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward." This panel will present the findings and recommendations reported by the NAS Committee on Identifying the Needs of the Forensic Science Community. Panelists will also discuss the study's potential impact on policy and practice and what the future holds for forensic science.

  • Pete Marone, Director of the Virginia Department of Forensic Science and Associate Professor of Forensic Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Va.
  • Joe Polski, Chief Operations Officer, International Association for Identification, Mendota Heights, Minn.
  • Barry Fisher, Crime Laboratory Director, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Dean Gialamas, Director, Forensic Science Services Division, Orange County Sheriff's Department, Santa Ana, Calif.
  • Moderator: Gerry LaPorte, Program Manager, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Fatigue: What Does It Mean for Public Safety Officers?

This panel will highlight current NIJ research on how fatigue and stress may increase performance errors, accidents, injuries and health problems among law enforcement officers. Panelists will also discuss how shift work can lead to insufficient sleep, fatigue and a decrease in alertness if work schedules, work hours and stress are not managed properly.

  • Stephen Lockley, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
  • Bryan Vila, Professor of Criminal Justice, Washington State University, Spokane, Wash.
  • Moderator: Brett Chapman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Project Safe Neighborhoods: What Works in Community-Level Intervention

This panel will present the findings of the Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) multisite evaluation. Panelists will discuss implementation fidelity, successful program elements and the overall effectiveness of PSN. Panelists will also review the history and evolution of the program.

  • Edmund F. McGarrell, Professor and Director, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Terri L. Shelton, Director of the Center for Youth, Family, and Community Partnerships and Professor, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, N.C.
  • Tate Chambers, National Coordinator, Project Safe Neighborhoods, Chicago, Ill.
  • Moderator: Louis Tuthill, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

NIJ's Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation

Researchers will review findings from NIJ's multisite adult drug-court evaluation, an unprecedented longitudinal process, impact and cost-evaluation study of such programs. Topics will include the influence that offender, court and community characteristics have on offender perceptions, service access, employment, compliance, relapse and recidivism.

  • Shelli B. Rossman, Senior Research Fellow, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Michael Rempel, Research Director, Center for Court Innovation, New York, N.Y.
  • John K. Roman, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Linda Truitt, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Using Mobile Biometric Devices to Verify Identity

Mobile biometric devices capture biometric samples in the field and search against a database or store the samples for later use. The devices can provide practical, actionable identity information to criminal justice practitioners. This panel will explore the capabilities and applications of mobile biometric devices, focusing on identity challenges faced by practitioners.

  • Duane Blackburn, Policy Analyst and FBI Agency Representative, National Science and Technology Council, Executive Office of the President of the United States, Washington, D.C.
  • B. Scott Swann, Chief, Technology Evaluation Standards Test Unit, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D.C.
  • Tom Hennig, Program Manager, City of Stockton Police Department, Stockton, Calif.
  • Moderator: William A. Ford, Chief, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
11:45 a.m. Break
12:00 p.m.

Lunch and Keynote Address:

R. Gil Kerlikowske, Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy, Executive Office of the President

1:45 p.m. Break
2:00 p.m. Workshops
Date Modified: April 8, 2010