NIJ Conference 2010: Agenda

   

Monday, June 14
8:30 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks

Kristina Rose, Acting Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
Watch Kristina Rose's remarks (11:56)

Laurie O. Robinson, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
Watch Laurie O. Robinson's Remarks (10:31)

8:45 a.m.

Plenary Panel: Rising From the Ashes — What We Have Learned From the Cameron Todd Willingham Case
Watch the panel (1:21:55)

Cameron Todd Willingham was executed in 2004 for setting his home on fire, resulting in the deaths of his three young children. The case gained renewed attention in 2009 as a result of investigative reporter David Granns article in The New Yorker, which described contradictions and controversies surrounding the case. The panel will discuss not only the facts of the case but also the lessons learned from it.

  • Itiel Dror, Cognitive Neuroscientist, University College London, United Kingdom
  • David Grann, Staff Writer, The New Yorker, New York
  • John Lentini, President and Principal Investigator, Scientific Fire Analysis LLC, Big Pine Key, Fla.
  • Michael Logan Ware, Chief, Special Fields Bureau, Dallas County District Attorneys Office
  • Moderator: Mary Lou Leary, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
10:15 a.m. Break
10:30 a.m. Concurrent Panels and Workshops

Data at Your Fingertips: An Introduction to the National Archives for Criminal Justice Data

NIJ established the Data Resources Program (DRP) at the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data to preserve and ensure the availability of data from NIJ-funded research and evaluations. Data sets are archived and made accessible to others to support new research that verifies original findings or tests new hypotheses. This workshop will depict the policies, products and operations of DRP's main priorities, which are grant funding, data archiving, establishing policies and improving data quality. The workshop will also provide attendees with a comprehensive set of guidelines on what to consider when using and archiving research data.

  • Tim Bynum, Director, National Archive of Criminal Justice Data, Inter-university Consortium on Political and Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Emerging Issues on Stalking

This panel will examine the state of stalking research and policies over the past 20 years and highlight new trends in stalking technology and investigation. Panelists will discuss model legislation and investigative practices and provide a framework for future stalking research.

  • D. Miles Brissette, Assistant District Attorney, Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney's Office, Fort Worth, Texas
  • Cindy Southworth, Vice President of Development and Innovation, National Network to End Domestic Violence, Washington, D.C.
  • Patricia Tjaden, Director, Center for Policy Research, Denver
  • Moderator: Kristina Rose, Acting Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

An Examination of Justice Reinvestment and Its Impact on Two States
Listen to the panel (1:09:23)

Funded in part by the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Pew Center on the States, the justice reinvestment project is a data-driven strategy aimed at policymakers to "reduce spending on corrections, increase public safety and improve conditions in the neighborhoods to which most people released from prison return." Representatives from two states where the justice reinvestment strategy is currently being implemented will discuss how it is being used to reduce the rate of incarceration and how states can reinvest in local communities.

  • Marshall Clement, Project Director, Justice Center, The Council of State Governments, New York
  • Jake Horowitz, Project Manager, Public Safety Performance Project, Pew Center on the States, Washington, D.C.
  • John Lazet, Chief of Staff, The Office of Senator Alan Cropsey, Lansing, Mich.
    Watch an interview with John Lazet (1:22)
  • Anne Rice, Associate Attorney General, New Hampshire Office of Attorney General, Concord
  • Moderator: Marie Garcia, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Forensic DNA Research and Development: New Methods for Deconvoluting Mixtures

The FBI's Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods has recently published the updated Interpretation Guidelines for Autosomal STR Typing by Forensic DNA Testing Laboratories. A major component of this document focuses on providing improved instructions for mixture interpretation of autosomal short tandem repeat DNA analysis. Although mixture deconvolution is traditionally performed at the data analysis and interpretation stage, new technologies are emerging that offer potential front-end solutions to the problems presented when biological evidence from multiple individuals is found at a crime scene. This panel will present the updated guidelines for mixture interpretation, as well as ongoing research for mixture deconvolution methods prior to DNA analysis.

  • John M. Butler, Fellow and Group Leader of Applied Genetics, National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • Tania Chakrabarty, Senior Scientist, Arryx Inc., Chicago
  • Phillip B. Danielson, Professor of Molecular Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver
  • Henry K. Lin, Eugene P. Wigner Fellow, Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Tenn.
  • Moderator: Minh Nguyen, Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Forensic Science and Interagency Working Groups: Creating Goals for the Future

The Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President has established, through its National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), a Subcommittee on Forensic Science (SOFS). A primary objective of NSTC is to establish clear national goals for federal science and technology investments in a broad array of areas, spanning virtually all mission areas of the executive branch. NIJ will provide an update on the goals and accomplishments of SOFS.

  • Kenneth E. Melson, Deputy Director, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Mark Stolorow, Director, Office of Law Enforcement Standards, National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • Moderator: Gerry LaPorte, Forensic Policy Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The Latest Geospatial Technologies to Prevent and Respond to Crime

Panelists will explore ongoing NIJ research on the development and application of geospatial and geographic profiling technologies. The discussion will include projects that are advancing cutting-edge geospatial visualization and analysis tools; incorporating state-of-the-art geospatial programs into easy-to-use, high-performance, open source software tools; developing new tools for three-dimensional geocoding technology to use in large urban structures; forming new, scalable methods to rapidly process building geometry data, designed to work in a desktop environment as well as mobile (hand-held) devices; and creating a mathematical prototype that uses geographic and demographic features in the profiling algorithm.

  • Julia Koschinsky, Research Director, GeoDa Center for Geospatial Analysis and Computation, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Mike O'Leary, Director of the Center for Applied Information Technology and Professor, Departments of Mathematics and Computer and Information Sciences, Towson University, Towson, Md.
  • Kalpathi Subramanian, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina, Charlotte
  • Moderator: Timothy Brown, Senior Consultant, Booz Allen Hamilton, and Research Associate, Mapping and Analysis for Public Safety, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Pathways to Desistance: Preventing Crime and Rehabilitating Juvenile Offenders

This panel will highlight findings from the seven-year longitudinal study of serious and persistent juvenile offenders from Philadelphia and Phoenix. Panelists will present the most rigorous research to date that compares youth who are waived or transferred to adult court with their peers who remain in the juvenile system, as well as explore the relationships between certain mental disorders and a range of outcomes (e.g., employment, education, living arrangements and recidivism) for these youth. Panelists will also examine the different effects of institutional placement on offending for individuals with and without certain mental disorders. A youth advocate will discuss how and under what conditions research findings, such as those from the Pathways to Desistance study, can be used to encourage legislative change.

  • Edward P. Mulvey, Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Law and Psychiatry Program, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
  • Beth Rosenberg, Director of Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice, Children's Action Alliance, Phoenix
  • Carol A. Schubert, Research Program Administrator, Law and Psychiatry Program, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
  • Moderator: Janet Chiancone, Research Coordinator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Policing Platform: Preliminary Results

Researchers will explain the policing platform and why it is important and relevant for law enforcement executives and organizations. The panelists will discuss the goal of the platform, which is to obtain information about policing by tracking the life-course of police officers and organizations, as well as the impact of training innovations on policing. The panel will also demonstrate the application of the platform for all types of police organizations: urban, rural, large, mid-size, small, state, local, tribal, etc.

  • Gary Cordner, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania
  • Dennis P. Rosenbaum, Professor of Criminal Justice and Psychology, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Rick Tanksley, Chief, Oak Park Police Department, Ill.
  • Moderator: Brett Chapman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

What Is Research and Evaluation Evidence and How Can We Use It?
Listen to the panel (1:14:51)

This panel will explore the development and use of evidence-based policies, programs and technologies to improve effectiveness and efficiencies related to government. Through casual observation, practices and programs may appear to be effective, but under closer scrutiny the results may look much different. We can improve our confidence in observed results and the information we share by carefully collecting evidence and using it in decision-making, thereby improving the effectiveness and efficiency of activities across the full range of criminal and juvenile justice challenges. Panelists will provide examples from government, law enforcement and research on how evidence can be applied to make more efficient use of government funding.

  • Ed McGarrell, Director and Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Stephanie Shipman, Assistant Director, Center for Evaluation Methods and Issues, Applied Research and Methods, U.S. Government Accountability Office, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Phelan Wyrick, Senior Social Science Analyst, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
    Watch an interview with Phelan Wyrick (0:59)
12:30 p.m.

Luncheon and Keynote Address: Indigent Defense and Access to Justice

Laurence Tribe, Senior Counselor for Access to Justice Initiative, U.S. Department of Justice
Watch Laurence Tribe's address (25:00)

2:00 p.m. Concurrent Panels

Evidence Backlogs and Their Impact on the Criminal Justice System
Listen to the panel (1:18:00)

Evidence backlogs have been known to be an issue in crime laboratories. A recent study published by NIJ has shown that backlogs of untested evidence are also an issue in law enforcement evidence storage. This panel will discuss the issues and present preliminary findings from a study of the Los Angeles Police Department's and Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department's experience with clearing out a large backlog of unanalyzed rape kits. Researchers are following the outcomes of the DNA analyses and examining case characteristics to get a better understanding of why these cases did not go forward in the first place. Panelists will also discuss backlog-reduction programs, legal and policy changes to backlog reductions, and potential future solutions, including capacity building, technology and information systems.

  • Dean M. Gialamas, Director, Scientific Services Bureau, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department
    Watch an interview with Dean Gialamas (2:00)
  • Jeffrey Nye, DNA Technical Leader, Forensic Science Division, Michigan State Police, East Lansing
  • Joseph L. Peterson, Professor and Director, School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics, California State University, Los Angeles
  • Kevin J. Strom, Senior Research Scientist, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Moderator: Gerry LaPorte, Forensic Policy Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Domestic Violence Research 15 Years After VAWA
Listen to the panel (1:06:45)

Since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act, a majority of the more than 250 research and evaluation studies funded by NIJ examined domestic violence issues. This research has been collected in the Compendium of Research on Violence Against Women, 1993-2009, which includes an abstract of each grant and the results of completed studies. The panelists will present an overview of the progress and the findings of domestic violence research from the past 15 years, as well as discuss a key ongoing debate concerning the amount of male versus female perpetration of domestic or intimate partner violence. The discussant will comment on these presentations and provide an advocate's view on the progress made since the act passed.

  • Connie Beck, Associate Professor, Psychology, Policy and Law Program, Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson
    Watch and interview with Connie Beck (2:59)
  • Barbara Hart, Director of Law and Policy, Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine, Portland
  • Claire M. Renzetti, Endowed Chair, Center for Research on Violence Against Women and Professor of Sociology, University of Kentucky
  • Moderator: Bernard Auchter, Acting Division Director, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

An Examination of the Impacts of Administrative Segregation on Mental Health

The panel will highlight final results from a longitudinal research study that examined the impacts of administrative segregation on the mental health of inmates in the Colorado Department of Corrections. This is the first study of its kind to follow inmates immediately after confinement to administrative segregation for one year. Panelists will provide an overview of the research and discuss whether claims that administrative segregation leads to harm and violates prisoners' rights are correct. Panelists will also explain the final results from the study and their implications for corrections administrations.

  • Jamie Fellner, Senior Counsel, U.S. Program, Human Rights Watch, New York
  • Susan Jones, Warden, Colorado State Penitentiary and Centennial Correctional Facility, Caon City
  • Kelli Klebe, Associate Professor and Chair, Psychology Department, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
  • Alysha M. Stucker, Professional Research Assistant, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
  • Moderator: Marie Garcia, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Gang Membership Prevention
Listen to the panel (1:05:08)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and NIJ are collaborating on a book that focuses on promising principles for gang membership prevention. This panel will discuss the risk and protective factors that influence gang membership as well as efforts to reduce such factors. Panelists will also explore the direction of gang research for the future.

  • James Buddy Howell, Senior Research Associate, National Youth Gang Center in Tallahassee, Fla.; and Special Advisor, Life History Research Program, University of Pittsburgh
  • Jorja Leap, Adjunct Associate Professor of Social Welfare, School of Public Affairs, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Gretchen C.F. Shappert, Project Safe Neighborhoods National Coordinator and Anti-Gang Coordinator, Executive Office for United States Attorneys, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Louis Tuthill, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Law Enforcement's Response to Human Trafficking: Assessing Strengths and Gaps

Local law enforcement agencies are often in the best position to identify human trafficking victims. However, recent research and expert working groups have highlighted the challenges of uncovering, investigating and prosecuting human trafficking cases. Panelists will discuss the research and how it can be used to expose, catch and prosecute offenders, as well as prevent the crime.

  • Amy Farrell, Assistant Professor, College of Criminal Justice and Associate Director, Institute on Race and Justice, Northeastern University, Boston
  • Edward Gallagher, Deputy Criminal Chief, Criminal Division, Southern District of Texas, U.S. Attorney's Office, Houston
  • Mike Shively, Senior Associate, Abt Associates Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The Relationship Between Foreclosures and Crime

The current trend of foreclosures in the U.S. is unprecedented. A prominent aspect of this trend has been increases in crime related to those foreclosures, including arson, squatting, theft and vandalism. In response to the growing concern, NIJ convened a panel of experts in March 2009 to examine this issue. To better understand the magnitude of this phenomenon, through this panel, NIJ established a research agenda that has identified several crime-related issues under three main sequential stages: 1) mortgage fraud, 2) domestic violence, and 3) neighborhood deterioration and the onset of long-term crime problems. This panel will provide an overview of the research agenda developed from that meeting with a discussion of each of the three main areas of concern.

  • Brandon Behlendorf, Fellow, University of Maryland, College Park; and Associate, National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, College Park, Md.
  • Deshonna Collier-Goubil, Former Research Assistant, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Scene Processing Protocols: Explosives, Fire and Mass Fatalities

This panel will highlight NIJ's current research and development in crime scene processing. Panelists will discuss research involving different scene scenarios, including mass fatalities and fire scenes. Panelists will also provide best practices and protocols, as well as new tools and technologies to assist the investigator in scene processing and documentation.

  • José R. Almirall, Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Director, International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami
  • Dennis C. Dirkmaat, Director, Department of Applied Forensic Sciences and Master of Science in Anthropology: Forensic and Biological Anthropology Concentration, Mercyhurst College, Erie, Pa.
  • André Marshall, Associate Professor, Department of Fire Protection Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Moderator: Danielle McLeod-Henning, Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Using License Plate Readers to Fight Crime
Listen to the panel (58:25)

This is a joint panel of NIJ's Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE ) and Office of Science and Technology (OST). Panelists will discuss the latest efforts to implement license plate reader technology into policing operations. OST grantees will explain various aspects of the technology and an ORE grantee from the National Opinion Research Center will present findings from a study on the use of license plate readers to combat auto theft in Arizona.

  • Dale Stockton, Program Manager, Road Runner, Automated Regional Justice Information System, San Diego, Calif.
  • Bruce G. Taylor, Principal Research Scientist, Substance Abuse, Mental Health and Criminal Justice Studies Department, National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago
  • Meghann Tracey, Project Manager, Technology Center, International Association of Chiefs of Police, Alexandria, Va.
  • Moderator: William A. Ford, Director, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
3:30 p.m. Break
3:45 p.m. Concurrent Panels, Forensic Science Demonstrations/Poster Session and Workshops

Are CEDs Safe and Effective?
Listen to the panel (1:08:49)

Thousands of law enforcement agencies throughout the United States have adopted conducted energy devices (CEDs) as a safe method to subdue individuals, but are these devices really safe? What policies should agencies adopt to ensure the proper use of this technology? This panel will discuss the physiological effects of electrical current in the human body caused by CEDs, as well as how this technology can reduce injuries to officers and suspects when appropriate policies and training are followed.

  • John C. Hunsaker III, Associate Chief Medical Examiner, Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Frankfort
  • Eugene A. Paoline III, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies, University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • William Terrill, Associate Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Scott Hammack, O'Melveny & Myers LLP, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Joseph Cecconi, General Engineer, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Court Case Management for Prosecution, Defense and Family Justice Services

This panel will discuss the role of court case management systems in prosecution, defense and client services. The Vera Institute of Justice's study on prosecution and racial justice began with the development and implementation of a prosecutor management information system, which allowed staff to observe patterns in case declinations and dismissals and led to policy changes to reduce disparities in law enforcement referrals and charging decisions. The Michigan State Appellate Defender Office established its own system to improve efficiency and the delivery of justice through automated information retrieval, form preparation and staff calendar management. In response to a California mandate, the San Diego Family Justice Center implemented a domestic violence communication system that electronically captures information to assess and track victims, witnesses and offenders.

  • James R. Neuhard, Director, State Appellate Defender Office, Detroit
  • Katie Mugg, Project Manager, Automated Regional Justice Information System, San Diego
  • Donald Stemen, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Loyola University, Chicago
  • Peter Gilchrist, District Attorney, Mecklenburg County
  • Moderator: William A. Ford, Director, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Developing the Offender Tracking Standard

This panel will focus on the mission and objectives of the Special Technical Committee (STC) for Offender Tracking and its standards development process. Panelists will discuss the current state of offender tracking in community corrections and the development of the Offender Tracking STC. Panelists will also provide an overview of the STC process and explain why it was created and the resulting documents.

  • George Drake, Consultant, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center, Rockville, Md.
  • Tom Roy, Executive Director, Arrowhead Regional Corrections, Duluth, Minn.
  • Jim Wong, Program Manager, Law Enforcement Technology Support Center, Savannah River National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Aiken, S.C.
  • Moderator: Jack Harne, Physical Scientist, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Forensic Science Demonstrations/Poster Session

DNA researchers will present their tools and recent findings through technology demonstrations and posters. Crime laboratory practitioners who receive support under NIJ's DNA Backlog Reduction Programs will present posters on such topics as success stories, improved laboratory efficiency and technology solutions to routinely encountered challenges. This session will also provide a forum for interaction and discussion among researchers, practitioners and conference participants with an interest in forensic science.

See a list of participating researchers and practitioner agencies.

Get Funded: Developing a Better Proposal
Listen to the panel (1:11:59)

Federal agencies, such as NIJ, fund only the top 10 percent of applications. This workshop will give you an overview on how to write a competitive proposal, complete the numerous forms required in federal funding, develop a budget, and address human subjects research and privacy issues. Instructors will also discuss the role of an institutional review board and explain data archiving, sound methodology, and the differences between social science research and technology research. Bring previous consensus reviews for ideas on how to improve your next proposal.

  • Bernard Auchter, Acting Division Director, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Jolene Hernon, Director, Office of Communications, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Carlene Shaifer-Jones, Financial Analyst, Office of the Chief Financial Officer, Grants Financial Management Division, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Alan Spanbauer, Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Cheryl Crawford Watson, Human Subjects Protection Compliance Officer, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Impression Evidence: Strengthening the Disciplines of Fingerprints, Firearms, Footwear, and Other Pattern and Impression Sciences Through Research
Listen to the panel (1:02:35)

Forensic examinations involving specific forensic science disciplines are typically dependent upon qualitative analyses and expert interpretation of observed patterns based on a scientific foundation, rather than quantitative results. These disciplines include latent fingerprints, questioned documents, footwear, and other forms of impression and pattern evidence. This panel will highlight current fundamental research needs in the areas of impression evidence examination and how NIJ is addressing those needs through its forensic research and development portfolio within the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences.

  • Lynn Abbott, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va.
  • Tom Busey, Professor of Cognitive Science, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • David Howitt, Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis
  • Sargur Srihari, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Moderator: Gerry LaPorte, Forensic Policy Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Improving Criminal Justice Outcomes by Focusing on Victims

This panel will focus on two studies that have practical implications for working with victims in criminal justice settings. The first study examined the effectiveness of coordinated outreach programs in intimate partner violence cases. The second study assessed adolescent victims who received sexual assault nurse examiner-sexual assault response team (SANE-SART) services to learn how their experiences influenced participation in prosecution. After discussion of the two studies, panelists will explain how these studies may inform practice and policy.

  • Rebecca Campbell, Professor of Community Psychology and Program Evaluation, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Anne P. DePrince, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Denver
    Watch an interview with Anne DePrince (1:50)
  • Meg Garvin, Executive Director, National Crime Victim Law Institute, Portland, Ore.
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

International Organized Crime: Recent Developments in Policy and Research
Listen to the panel (56:19)

Since 2008 DOJ has been reviewing its policies and programs on international organized crime, with the goal of strengthening law enforcement's response to this threat. In this panel, the speakers will explore how DOJ and other U.S. government agencies are responding to it. Attendees will learn more about the Attorney General's Organized Crime Council, the International Organized Crime Intelligence and Operations Center, and the recent National Intelligence Estimate on International Organized Crime. Staff from NIJ's International Center will discuss the results of a recent expert working group on research needs in this area and how the Institute is supporting its sister agencies with research and information.

  • Lisa Holtyn, Senior Intelligence Adviser, Organized Crime and Racketeering Section, Criminal Division, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Jennifer Shaksky Calvery, Senior Counsel to the Deputy Attorney General, Director of the Attorney General's Organized Crime Council, and Head, International Organized Crime Intelligence and Operations Center, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Panelist and Moderator: John T. Picarelli, Social Science Analyst, International Center, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Public Use Operations of Unmanned Aircraft Systems: From University Research to SWAT Team

This panel will focus on the public use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in national air space. Presenters will discuss current issues, their impact on the law enforcement community, and the steps taken and progress made to address the matter. Speakers will highlight the first UAS Stakeholders meeting, recently co-hosted by NIJ, and provide an update on the status of action items from the meeting. Presenters will also propose next steps.

  • Rosanne Bailey, Special Projects Coordinator for Unmanned Aircraft Systems, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • Ron Barrett-Gonzalez, Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Jeffrey Evans, Tactical Flight Officer, Aircraft Section, Texas Department of Public Safety, Austin
  • Moderator: Tim Adelman, Program Manager, Sheriffs' Association of Texas, Austin
5:15 p.m. Adjourn
Tuesday, June 15
8:30 a.m. Poster Session Breakfast

Enjoy breakfast and mingle with colleagues as you discuss the contents of more than 30 posters on a wide range of topics — from technology to victimization to trainings on how to investigate a cold case. A special section will be devoted to learning more about NIJ and its divisions and activities. The breakfast and poster session is an opportunity to view the Institutes research in progress, nurture partnerships and give feedback to one another.

10:15 a.m. Break
10:30 a.m.

Plenary Panel: Cell Phones in Prisons
Listen to the entire panel (1:22:25)

Criminals are using cell phones illegally in prisons and jails to conduct their business and intimidate witnesses. Although technology solutions to this problem are available, they can create new challenges, such as legal and implementation issues associated with cell phone use in correctional facilities. Panelists will discuss various aspects to consider from how prisoners use cell phones, to day-to-day and operational aspects, to legal and regulatory concerns.

  • Larry D. Atlas, Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary, National Telecommunications and Information Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • James Arden Barnett, Jr., Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, Federal Communication Commission
  • Harley Lappin, Director, Federal Bureau of Prisons, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Gary D. Maynard, Secretary, Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Service
  • Aaron D. Kennard, Executive Director, National Sheriffs' Association
    Watch and interview with Aaron Kennard (1:16)
  • Moderator: Ellen Scrivner, Deputy Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
12:00 p.m. Lunch (on your own)
1:15 p.m. Concurrent Panels

CCTV Systems: Do They Work and How Can They Be Made More Effective?

Smile! Because you are probably on camera. With technology constantly emerging, the use of video cameras for public and private interests has become more and more common; therefore, the need to determine their true relevance to crime fighting, as well as how to improve their effectiveness, is immediate. Panelists will discuss a current NIJ study that is examining whether and how closed-circuit television (CCTV) systems impact crime in the area they monitor. This panel will also offer suggestions for ways to improve the usefulness of video cameras, including presentations on the work by GE Global Research to develop software that automatically detects potentially suspicious behavior in real-time and the Lancaster City (Pa.) Bureau of Polices effective public-private partnership with businesses and community organizations.

  • Nils Krahnstoever, Senior Research Scientist, Visualization and Computer Vision Lab, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, N.Y.
  • Jerry H. Ratcliffe, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Keith Sadler, Chief of the Lancaster City Bureau of Police, Pa.
  • Moderator: Frances J. Scott, Physical Scientist, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

How Predictive Policing Is Changing the Law Enforcement Landscape

Predictive policing refers to any strategy or tactic that develops and uses information and advanced analysis to inform forward-thinking and innovative crime prevention. Panelists will discuss technical elements, policy implications and privacy issues related to predictive policing. Panelists will also present cases that have successfully implemented predictive analysis and explore what lies ahead.

  • Raymond Guidetti, Supervisory Intelligence Manager, New Jersey Regional Operations and Intelligence Center, Trenton, N.J.
  • Greg Ridgeway, Director, Safety and Justice Program and Center on Quality Policing, RAND Corp., Santa Monica, Calif.
    Watch and interview with Grede Ridgeway (2:23)
  •  Moderator: William A. Ford, Director, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The Impact of Neighborhoods on Youth Behavior

Neighborhood context and composition can affect crime patterns and the strategies used to prevent and target crime. Panelists will discuss whether collective efficacy, a concept that explains the capacity of residents, organizations and other groups to exert levels of social control, can reduce crime in neighborhoods that have high-risk factors. The panel will also explain how programs and neighborhoods jointly shape youth behavior. Using GIS and spatial data mining, the panelists have identified the conditions under which rehabilitative programs can be most successful in reducing juvenile recidivism, given the simultaneous effects neighborhood, program and individual characteristics (including family) have on youth.

  • Marc Buslik, Captain, Chicago Police Department
  • Phil Harris, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Shellie E. Solomon, CEO , Justice & Security Strategies Inc., Hallandale Beach, Fla.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Pretrial Programs and Research

NIJ has identified the pretrial and jail release phases of the criminal justice system as an understudied research priority. At these stages, case management and other key decisions affecting detention, case outcome and sentencing are made. Such decisions have important repercussions for defendants/offenders, victims and their families, and policymakers. Panelists will discuss the various concerns of detention and incarceration alternatives, such as risk and needs assessment; public safety; court appearances; supervision; costs and benefits; and other related issues, including disparities in case processing and special populations (e.g., juveniles). See NIJ's Web site for additional information at http://www.nij.gov/topics/courts/pretrial/

research-meeting/welcome.htm.

  • Mari Curbelo, Director of Court Programs, New York City Criminal Justice Agency
  • Jennifer Fratello, Associate Research Director, Center on Youth Justice, Vera Institute of Justice, New York
  • Kenneth D. Robinson, President and Founder, Correctional Counseling Inc., Germantown, Tenn.
  • Moderator: Linda Truitt, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Project HOPE: From Practice to Policy

Research indicates that sanctions are more effective if delivered with swiftness and certainty. Yet many community supervision agencies struggle with this goal, weighed down by paperwork, lengthy delays in court and other obstacles. In the Hawaii HOPE program, judges send high-risk violators to jail for a short stay. This sanction is applied within 48 hours in a process designed to be fair, swift and certain. This panel offers a description of Hawaii's HOPE program, with a focus on development, philosophy and implementation. Panelists will also discuss the impetus and development of the related federal legislative proposal (H.R. 4055), research results, and the costs and benefits of the project.

  • The Honorable Steven Alm, Judge, First Circuit Court, Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Sabrina Zeinab-Hamdeh, Research Assistant, Pepperdine University, Malibu, Calif. (presenting on behalf of Angela Hawken)
  • Moderator: Nancy Merritt, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Sexual Violence Research 15 Years After VAWA
Listen to the panel (1:05:50)

Panelists will summarize the progress and results of sexual violence research since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994. The panel will also examine how research has contributed to policy, assess current knowledge gaps and discuss research needs.

  • Rebecca Campbell, Professor of Community Psychology and Program Evaluation, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Bonnie S. Fisher, Professor, Division of Criminal Justice and Research Fellow, Center for Criminal Justice Research, University of Cincinnati
    Watch and interview with Bonnie Fisher (2:21)
  • Delilah Rumburg, Executive Director, Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, Enola
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Social Science Research on Forensics

This panel will present findings from the two forensic evidence projects and the follow-up study of the DNA property crimes field experiment. The projects examined the use of forensic evidence from the crime scene through court disposition to determine the role and impact it has on case outcomes in a variety of offenses. The DNA field experiment follow-up study reviewed court dispositions and criminal histories of offenders prosecuted for property crimes using DNA evidence. Panelists will also discuss implications for forensic policy.

  • Tom McEwen, Director of Research, Institute for Law and Justice Inc., Alexandria, Va.
  • Joseph L. Peterson, Professor and Director, School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics, California State University, Los Angeles
  • John Roman, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Katharine Browning, Senior Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The State of the Police Field: A New Professionalism in Policing?
Listen to the panel (1:08:24)

Panelists will debate the premise of a Harvard Executive Session working paper that suggests police organizations are striving for a "new" professionalism. Leaders are endeavoring for stricter standards of efficiency and conduct, while also increasing their legitimacy to the public and encouraging innovation. Is this new? Will this idea lead to prematurely discarding community policing as a guiding philosophy?

  • Ronald Davis, Chief, East Palo Alto Police Department, Calif.
  • David Sklansky, Yosef Osheawich Professor of Law and Faculty Chair, Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice, University of California, Berkeley, School of Law
    Watch and interview with David Sklansky (2:42)
  • Christopher Stone, Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Professor of the Practice of Criminal Justice, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
  • Moderator: Ellen Scrivner, Deputy Director, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
2:45 p.m. Break
3:00 p.m. Concurrent Panels and Workshops

Data-Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety

Data-Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety (DDACTS) is a law enforcement operational model that uses the integration of location-based crime and traffic crash data to establish effective and efficient methods for deploying law enforcement resources. Presenters will discuss how DDACTS ensures accountability and provides a dynamic, evidenced-based problem-solving approach to crime and crashes. This approach, grounded in community-oriented law enforcement, suggests that place-based policing, versus person-based (traditional) policing, is more efficient as a focus of law enforcement actions; provides a more stable target for law enforcement activities; has a stronger evidence base; and raises fewer ethical and legal problems.

  • Howard Hall, Commanding Officer, Operational Services Section, Baltimore County Police Department, Md.
  • Emily N. Puls, Traffic Analyst, Baltimore County Police Department, Towson, Md.
  • Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Panelist and Moderator: Earl Hardy, Highway Safety Specialist, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C.

Forensic Information Data Exchange and the Partnership Between Law Enforcement and Crime Laboratories
Listen to the panel (1:02:56)

  • Aaron Gorrell, President and CEO, Waterhole Software Inc., Colorado Springs, Colo.
  • Kevin Kosiorek, Criminalist, Serology Section, Crime Laboratory Unit, Boston Police Department
  • Jim Markey, Sergeant, Phoenix Police Department
  • Michael O'Berry, Operations Manager, National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, National Forensic Science Technology Center, Largo, Fla.
  • Moderator: William A. Ford, Director, Information and Sensor Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

From Paper to Practice: DOJ's Global Initiative Delivers Solutions for Information Sharing

DOJ's Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative serves as the voice of the criminal justice system, supporting policies and procedures that improve the way agencies share data. Global represents more than 30 of the nation's leading practitioner organizations in law enforcement, courts, corrections, probation and parole, and local and state government. Through Global programs, innovative technology has been implemented at all levels of government and taken standards-based information sharing to new and exciting levels, allowing the criminal justice field to leverage the best cost-effective and efficient solutions from private industry. This panel will discuss some of Global's most important activities and provide real-world case studies of their impact on the field.

  • Paul Embley, Chairman, Justice XML Structure Task Force, National Center for State Courts, Williamsburg, Va.
  • Raymond Guidetti, Supervisory Intelligence Manager, New Jersey Regional Operations and Intelligence Center, Trenton, N.J.
  • Carl A. Wicklund, Vice Chairman, Global Advisory Committee, Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.; and Executive Director and Secretariat, American Probation and Parole Association, The Council of State Governments, Lexington, Ky.
  • Moderator: Christopher Traver, Senior Policy Advisor, Justice Information Sharing, Policy Office, Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

How Police Fatigue Affects Performance

Shift work, overtime and night hours are required in policing, as in many other occupations. Research has demonstrated that these factors may result in insufficient sleep, diminished alertness and fatigue if work schedules, hours and stress are not managed properly. In turn, greater fatigue and stress may increase performance errors, accidents and injuries, and health problems. Current NIJ grantees will discuss ongoing studies and results in this area.

  • Paul Capitelli, Executive Director, Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training, Sacramento, Calif.
  • Bryan Vila, Professor of Criminal Justice, Washington State University, Spokane
  • John Violanti, Professor, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Moderator: Brett Chapman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

NIJ's Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation: The Final Results

The Urban Institute, the Center for Court Innovation and the Research Triangle Institute have completed an NIJ-funded longitudinal process, impact and cost evaluation of adult drug court treatment programs. The study involved three waves of interviews with staff and other stakeholders using computer-assisted personal interviewing technology, as well as an examination of administrative records on treatment and recidivism, drug detection tests, court observations, and budget and other cost information. The sample included approximately 1,200 drug court participants and 600 comparison group subjects across 23 drug courts and six comparison sites. Panelists will discuss the impact of drug courts on relapse, recidivism and psychosocial outcomes; how program policies and practices affect participant experiences; and how drug courts produce different outcomes given offender characteristics and attitudes.

  • Mia Green, Senior Research Associate, Center for Court Innovation, New York
  • Christine Lindquist, Senior Research Sociologist, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • John Roman, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Shelli Rossman, Senior Fellow, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Linda Truitt, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Sex Offenders in the Community: Post-Release, Registration, Notification and Residency Restrictions
Listen to the panel (56:48)

The management of sexual offenders in the community post-release is an issue of increasing concern to law enforcement, policymakers and the public. In recent years, efforts to strengthen registration and notification have been enhanced. At the same time, comparatively little attention has been paid to related matters, such as how residency restrictions may impact offenders' efforts to find stable work and living arrangements once they are released from prison, whether rates of recidivism have changed, and whether these policies increase the safety of potential victims. Panelists will explore what recent research says about these concerns.

  • Alisa Klein, Public Policy Consultant, Association for the Treatment of Sex Abusers, Beaverton, Ore.
    Watch an interview with Alisa Klein (2:33)
  • Elizabeth Letourneau, Assistant Professor, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, S.C. 
  • Kristen M. Zgoba, Research Scientist, New Jersey Department of Corrections, Trenton, N.J. 
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Situational Approaches to Making Communities and Correctional Institutions Safer
Listen to the panel (1:08:49)

Panelists will present the results of three studies that applied situational crime prevention (SCP) principles: (1) an evaluation of the Safe City initiative in Chula Vista, Calif., designed to combine the expertise and resources of local law enforcement, retailers and the community to increase the safety of designated retail areas; (2) a randomized controlled trial (in partnership with the Washington Metro Transit Police) that assessed the effectiveness of SCP to reduce car crime in Metro's parking facilities; and (3) an evaluation of the impact of SCP on preventing sexual assaults and inmate misconduct in a jail setting. Panelists will also discuss the studies' implications for theory, policy and practice.

  • Nancy La Vigne, Director, Justice Policy Institute, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Gary Wedge, Captain, Administrative Services Division, Chula Vista Police Department, Calif.
  • Tara H. Wildes, Chief, Jails Division, Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, Fla.
  • Moderator: Winnie Reed, Director, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Special Technical Committees: How They Are Changing NIJ's Standards Development Process
Listen to the panel (1:17:09 )

NIJ has established a new standards development process based on Special Technical Committees whose members include practitioners, scientists, researchers, subject matter experts, staff of test laboratories and major criminal justice stakeholder organizations, and representatives knowledgeable in standards development and conformity assessment. The members collaborate to develop the standard and ensure that practitioner needs are addressed. The members' diversity guarantees the standard package — the performance standard, the conformity assessment program requirements, and the selection and application guide — is valid and respected by the user community. This workshop will highlight the NIJ standards development process and how it fits with the processes of other government agencies and private sector organizations. Also discussed will be the difference between regulatory and voluntary standards. The panelists each have experience with the NIJ process and will discuss standards development and conformity assessment from their individual perspectives.

  • Gordon Gillerman, Chief, Standards Services Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • William Haskell, Co-Chair, National Occupational Research Agenda Public Safety Council, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Andover, Mass.
  • Philip Matteson, Program Manager, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, D.C.
  • David McBath, InterAgency Board Chair, New York State Police, Albany
  • Robert Vondrasek, Vice President, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, Mass.
  • Moderator: Debra Stoe, Physical Scientist, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
4:30 p.m. Adjourn
Wednesday, June 16
8:30 a.m. Concurrent Panels

Children Exposed to Violence
Listen to the panel (1:15:17)

Panelists will discuss the results of the recent Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's National Survey on Children's Exposure to Violence and findings from a seven-year follow-up study, funded by NIJ, on home visitation in New York. The survey's findings included startling figures: More than 60 percent of the children interviewed were exposed to violence, crime and abuse within the past year, and more than 1 in 10 were injured in an assault. The New York study evaluated Healthy Families New York, a home-visiting program that focuses on parent-child interactions and child development, and found its programs may help girls avoid risky or deviant behaviors during their early school years. The discussant will provide a practitioner's perspective on these studies and the critical issues of children exposed to violence.

  • Kimberly DuMont, Research Associate, New York State Office of Children and Family Services, Rensselaer
  • David Finkelhor, Director, Crimes Against Children Research Center; Co-Director, Family Research Laboratory; and Professor, Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire, Durham
  • Patricia Stern, Founder and Chief Consultant, Stern Steps, South Orange, N.J.
  • Moderator: Erica Smith, Statistician, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Cold Case Units: Best Practices

This panel brings together cold case grant awards made by NIJ's Office of Research and Evaluation and Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences. Panelists will report the findings from studies that examined which factors are more likely to be found in effective cold case units. Panelists will also discuss survey results from a study that assessed the relationship between cold case units and CODIS hits. A crime laboratory director will provide the practitioner's perspective of cold case units.

  • Robert Davis, Senior Social Research Analyst, Center on Quality Policing, RAN D Corp., Arlington, Va.
  • Charles Heurich, Physical Scientist, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Gregory S. LaBerge, Scientific Director and Bureau Commander, Denver Police Department
    Watch and Interview with Gregory LaBerge (2:29)
  • Moderator: Brett Chapman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Crime Across Metropolitan Areas

This panel will explore the degree to which differences between cities, metropolitan areas, neighborhoods and households affect criminal activity. Panelists will discuss an analysis of annual homicide trends for youth that is attempting to determine whether city characteristics identified in prior homicide research account for the variation of these trends between cities. Panelists will also examine current research projects that ask, among other things, whether the effect of foreclosure rates on neighborhood crime levels varies across cities and metropolitan areas in systematic ways, what effect the race and class composition of a city has on its trajectory of crime, and whether disadvantaged neighborhoods with high levels of poverty have a nonlinear effect on crime.

  • Eric P. Baumer, Allen E. Liska Professor of Criminology, College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Angela Browne, Specialist, Policy Research and Government Relations, Vera Institute of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • John R. Hipp, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminology, Law and Society, and Sociology, University of California, Irvine
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Exogenous DNA Contamination in Forensic Casework

NIJ held a workshop on minimizing exogenous DNA contamination in November 2009; attendees agreed that a greater awareness of the potential issues was necessary. Panelists will examine prevention, identification and, if necessary, remediation of exogenous DNA contamination in forensic casework.

  • Theresa Caragine, Special Deputy Director, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, New York
  • Suni M. Edson, Assistant Technical Leader, Mitochondrial DNA Section, Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, Rockville, Md.
  • Ted Staples, Manager of Forensic Biology, Division of Forensic Sciences, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Decatur
  • Moderator: Minh Nguyen, Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The Greening of Corrections

Panelists will discuss the Green Technology Guidebook, a project that is funded by NIJ's Office of Science and Technology and will assist institutional corrections managers with specific issues surrounding green technologies for corrections. Panelists will also explain initiatives by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to increase awareness of environmental conservation efforts in the field of corrections. NIC's project will assess the feasibility of green-collar jobs in correctional facilities and create an assessment tool for administrators to use in considering green improvements to their buildings. Panelists will describe Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention-funded projects that use green strategies in juvenile correctional settings and suggest how these might apply to adult corrections.

  • Eugene Atherton, Institutions Program Manager, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Rocky Mountain Region, Denver
  • Patrick Dunckhorst, Program Manager, Demonstration Programs Division, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Lisa Johnson, Senior Project Officer, National Institute for Work and Learning, U.S. Education and Workforce Development Group, Academy for Educational Development, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Laurie Bright, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The NIJ Standards and Testing Program: Best Practices for Law Enforcement

This panel will focus on soon-to-be-released NIJ standards that are being developed according to the new NIJ standards development process. Topics of discussion will include an overview of the NIJ standards development process and standards for the following equipment: chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear protective ensembles; bomb suits; duty holsters; restraints; electronic countermeasures; and handheld and walk-through metal detectors. Panelists will also discuss the impact of these standards on the law enforcement , corrections and public safety community.

  • Michael Blanton, Traffic Section Commander, Bureau of Special Operations, Lexington Division of Police, Ky.
  • Jay DeBold, Regional STAR Commander, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, Columbus
  • Stephanie Elder, Chemical Engineer, Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, Mass.
  • Patricia Gleason, President, Safety Equipment Institute, McLean, Va.
  • Casandra Robinson, Principal Engineer, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Debra Stoe, Physical Scientist, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Problem Solving to Reduce Gun Violence and Drug Markets

Various evaluations have been done on the Comprehensive Anti-Gang Initiative, Project Safe Neighborhoods and the Drug Market Initiative. This panel includes the lead researcher of these evaluations. Panelists will discuss the findings from the evaluations. They will also offer recommendations on how the programs can be improved and suggestions for moving forward.

  • Tim Bynum, Director, National Archive of Criminal Justice Data, Inter-university Consortium on Political and Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Natalie Hipple, Research Specialist, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Ed McGarrell, Director and Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Moderator: Louis Tuthill, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Prosecuting Cases of Elder Abuse
Listen to the panel (1:17:49)

This panel will feature NIJ-funded research that has direct, practical implications for the prosecution of elder abuse cases. Panelists will present findings from a study of prosecutors in three states that examined the factors that influenced their decisions to prosecute elder financial abuse cases. The panel will also provide the results from an evaluation of five innovative court-based models that target perpetrators of elder abuse. A prosecutor from King County (located in Seattle) will discuss how these studies can assist criminal justice system professionals in pursuing cases of elder abuse.

  • Shelly Jackson, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Lori Stiegel, Senior Attorney, Commission on Law and Aging, American Bar Association, Washington, D.C.
  • Page Ulrey, Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, King County Prosecutor's Office, Seattle, Wash.
  • Moderator: Andy Mao, Senior Counsel for Health Care Fraud and Elder Justice, Civil Fraud Section, Civil Division, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
10:00 a.m. Break
10:15 a.m. Concurrent Panels and Workshops

Cultural Aspects of Victimization

This panel will highlight a study that interviewed Filipina, Pakistani and Indian women using a culturally adapted Life History Calendar to capture lifetime intimate partner violence, stalking and sexual violence. Researchers also examined the women's experiences with the criminal justice system and victim services. This study provides some of the first empirical information on criminal justice contact with these populations, as well as recommendations to better serve them. Panelists will also discuss the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Campus Sexual Assault Study. Researchers used a Web-based survey to collect data from 4,000 undergraduate women at geographically diverse campuses and a mail survey that obtained data from campus criminal justice personnel and service providers.

  • Karma Cotton, Vice President of Policy and Emerging Issues, National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV), Washington, D.C.
  • Anne P. DePrince, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Denver
  • Christopher Krebs, Senior Research Social Scientist, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Condencia Brade, co-founder and Executive Director, National Organization of Sisters of Color Ending Sexual Assault (SCESA), Canton, Connecticut
  • Moderator: Bethany Backes, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Do Hot Spots Techniques Predict Crime Locations?

This panel will review a comprehensive research effort by NIJ's Mapping and Analysis for Public Safety Program and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, to evaluate how law enforcement agencies use hot spot techniques to predict crime. Panelists will first discuss the accuracy of such techniques, based on the different methods of locating an incident. Next, the panel will demonstrate the performance of each technique in predicting clusters of crime and explain how the spatial structure of crime types and urban context affect the efficiency of the techniques. Finally, panelists will present current research on identifying the appropriate grid cell size to analyze aggregated crime incidents.

  • Timothy Brown, Senior Consultant, Booz Allen Hamilton, and Research Associate, Mapping and Analysis for Public Safety, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Christopher Bruce, Crime Analyst, Danvers Police Department, Mass.; and President, International Association of Crime Analysts, Overland Park, Kan.
  • Paul Zandbergen, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Moderator: Joel Hunt, Graduate Research Assistant, Mapping and Analysis for Public Safety, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Forensic Aspects of Elder Abuse
Listen to the panel (1:02:48)

This panel will feature the latest research on forensic aspects of elder abuse detection and prosecution. Panelists will discuss results from a recently completed study that examined the characteristics of pressure sores on elders who received quality care, emphasizing how this research informs the field about the warning signs of potential neglect. Panelists will also present findings from a study on how well elderly individuals with mild or moderate dementia remember emotional events. This study has implications for determining the reliability of abused elders to serve as witnesses to their own abuse. The panel will discuss other effects both studies have on the field as well.

  • Susan Chasson, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Coordinator, Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault, Salt Lake City; Family Nurse Practitioner, Merrill Gappmayer Family Medicine Clinic, Provo, Utah
  • Solomon Liao, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine and Director of Geriatric Education, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine
  • Aileen Wiglesworth, Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine
  • Moderator: Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Improving Efficiency in the DNA Laboratory

Panelists will discuss projects they designed to improve efficiency in their laboratories and which ones are funded by the DNA Initiative's Forensic DNA Unit Efficiency Improvement Program. These projects include using a novel DNA extraction method, improving procedural methods for mtDNA testing and developing an expert system to assess the quality of mtDNA sequence data, and assisting a local police department set up an accredited biological screening lab to reduce the bottleneck that the DNA laboratory faces.

  • Cecelia Crouse, Chief Scientific Officer, Crime Laboratory, and Manager, Forensic Biology Unit, Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office, Fla.
  • Scott Hummel, DNA Technical Leader and Supervisor, Crime Laboratory, Kansas City Police Department, Mo.
  • Rhonda K. Roby, Associate Professor and Project Coordinator, Health Science Center, University of North Texas, Fort Worth
  • Moderator: Mark Nelson, Senior Program Manager, Investigative and Forensic Science Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods: Aspects of Acculturation and Resilience

This session will highlight two NIJ-funded projects examining multiple waves of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods' longitudinal data. Panelists will discuss behavioral resilience over time among urban adolescents differentially exposed to community violence, accounting for individual and neighborhood-level risks. Panelists will also examine how acculturation and the neighborhood context of Hispanic youth relate to their involvement in crime and their victimization experiences.

  • Denise Paquette Boots, Assistant Professor, School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, University of Texas, Dallas
  • Sonia Jain, Senior Researcher, Health and Human Development Program, WestEd, San Francisco, Calif.
  • Chris Maxwell, Associate Dean for Research, College of Social Science and Associate Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing; and Associate Research Scientist, Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Jennifer Wareham, Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Recognizing and Handling Digital Evidence

More and more often, law enforcement officers arrive at a crime scene containing evidence on digital equipment — cell phones; smartphones and PDAs, such as BlackBerry and iPhone; iPods; thumb or flash drives; and desktop computers and laptops. This workshop will describe the typical kinds of evidence found on such devices. The instructor will also explain how to identify the evidence and handle the technology to ensure that evidence will be admissible in court. This workshop is primarily for law enforcement officers and prosecutors, but researchers interested in digital crime and its investigation will likely gain insight from the discussion.

  • Robert O'Leary, Director, Electronic Crime Technology Center of Excellence, National Law Enforcement and Correction Technology Center, Phillipsburg, N.J.

Studying Implementation: The Example of the National Criminal Justice-Drug Abuse Treatment Studies Research Collaboration

The National Institute on Drug Abuse's National Criminal Justice-Drug Abuse Treatment Studies, a research collaboration with researchers, criminal justice professionals and drug abuse treatment practitioners, is studying the difficulties of implementing evidence-based practices related to drug abuse treatment. Specifically, the group is looking at how to improve implementation of interventions at the organizational level in three domains — assessment process, medication-assisted treatment, and HIV testing and treatment — for offenders with drug problems. Panelists will provide a general framework of the research, preliminary data on current practices and implementation difficulties, and information on the strategies being used to improve the quality of practice and implementation in these three domains.

  • Bennett Fletcher, Senior Research Psychologist, National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Md.
  • Akiva M. Liberman, Health Science Administrator, National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Md.
  • Gary Zajac, Research and Evaluation Manager, Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, Camp Hill
  • Moderator: Laurie Bright, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

A View From the Street: Police Leaders Share Their Perspectives on Urgent Policy and Research Issues Facing Law Enforcement in 2010 and Beyond
Listen to the panel (40:04)

Sponsored by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and its Research Advisory Committee (RAC), this panel unites law enforcement leaders from across the country to discuss their policy and research concerns. Charles Wellford, IACP RAC co-chair and University of Maryland professor, will facilitate the panel. Presenters will discuss urgent policing issues that merit ongoing research, law enforcement and academic research partnerships, and how research can and does affect agency policy and operations.

  • Rick Fuentes, Superintendent, New Jersey State Police, West Trenton
  • Steven Martin, Chief, Hopewell Township Police Department, N.J.
  • Stephanie Stoiloff, Senior Police Bureau Commander, Miami-Dade Police Department, Miami, Fla.
  • J. Michael Ward II, Chief, Alexandria Police Department, Ky.
  • Moderator: Charles Wellford, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland; and Co-Chair, Research Advisory Committee, International Association of Chiefs of Police, Alexandria, Va.
12:00 p.m.

Luncheon and Keynote Address

Throughout her more than 30 years as an award-winning news journalist, Paula Zahn has covered topics related to crime and justice all too often. Now at Investigation Discovery as the executive producer of her own series focused on investigation and justice, Zahn will share how the media can shed light on critical criminal justice issues and play a role in informing and empowering the public.

  • Paula Zahn, Executive Producer and Host of On the Case with Paula Zahn, Investigation Discovery, Silver Spring, Md.

Plenary Panel: VAWA — Celebrating 15 Years and Moving Forward Together

Lives have been saved, survivors have been heard, families have been protected, and the criminal justice community has received training on the complex responses to domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking. Panelists will examine the achievements that were made possible because of the Violence Against Women Act and discuss ways to further improve the lives of girls, women and families across the country.

  • Karen D. Carroll, Associate Director, Bronx Sexual Assault Response Team, New York
    Watch an interview with Karen Carroll (0:51)
  • Bernard Melekian, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Michael Paymar, Representative, Minnesota House of Representatives, St. Paul
  • Catherine Pierce, Deputy Director, Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Lynn Rosenthal, White House Advisor on Violence Against Women, Office of the Vice President, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Kristina Rose, Acting Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. 
1:45 p.m. Adjourn
Date Modified: September 22, 2011