NIJ Conference 2011: Recorded Panels

 

Title and Date Link to Media
Familial DNA Searching: Issues and Answers
NIJ Conference
Panel
June 2011

Familial DNA searching is the practice of creating new investigative leads in cases where DNA evidence found at the scene of a crime strongly resembles that of an existing DNA profile but is not an exact match. Panelists will explain how the technology works, provide examples of successful convictions obtained through familial searches, and discuss the various misconceptions and concerns regarding this practice.

Moderator: Kristina Rose, Deputy Director, National Institute of Justice
Panelists:
  • Stephen Mercer, Chief Attorney, Forensics Division, Office of the Public Defender, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Mitch Morrissey, District Attorney, Denver District Attorney's Office
  • Steven R. Siegel, Director of Program Development, Denver District Attorney's Office
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Audio recording (1:19:53)

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The National Broadband (Communications) Plan: Issues for Public Safety
NIJ Conference
Panel
June 2011

The Federal Communications Commission delivered the National Broadband Plan in March 2010. As part of the plan, the FCC proposed a strategy for implementing a national public safety broadband network that would allow public safety responders anywhere in the nation to send and receive critical voice, video and data to save lives, reduce injuries, and prevent acts of crime and terror. How this strategy is implemented will have a significant impact on criminal justice and other public safety agencies nationwide, both with respect to operational capability and to resources. There are competing views of how this plan should be implemented, each with its pros and cons. This panel illuminates those issues from both sides of the debate.

Moderator: Marisa Chun, Deputy Associate Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice
Panelists:
  • James Barnett, Rear Admiral (ret.), Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, Federal Communication Commission
  • Anna Gomez, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information and Deputy Administrator, National Telecommunications and Information Administration
  • Allan Sadowski, IT Manager, North Carolina State Highway Patrol
  • Gregory Schaffer, Acting Deputy Under Secretary, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security
  • Bill Schrier, Chief Technology Officer, City of Seattle, Washington
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Audio recording (1:29:00)

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How Collaboration Between Researchers and Police Chiefs Can Improve the Quality of Sexual Assault Investigations: A Look at Los Angeles
NIJ Conference
Panel
June 2011

Panelists discuss the application of research findings from an NIJ-sponsored study of sexual assault attrition to police practice in Los Angeles. There are three main focal points: (1) the mutual benefits of researcher/practitioner partnerships, (2) the implications of variation in police interpretation of UCR guidelines specific to clearing sexual assault (with an emphasis on cases involving nonstrangers), and (3) the content of specialized training that must be required for patrol officers and detectives who respond to and investigate sex crimes.

Moderator: Bethany Backes, Social Science Analyst, National Institute of Justice
Panelists:
  • Joanne Archambault, Executive Director, End Violence Against Women
  • Robert Casey, Chief, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Michel Moore, Director, Office of Special Operations, Los Angeles Police Department
  • Cassia Spohn, Professor, Arizona State University, Phoenix
  • Katharine Tellis, Assistant Professor, California State University, Los Angeles
Still image linking to the recorded panel How Collaboration Between Researchers and Police Chiefs Can Improve the Quality of Sexual Assault Investigations: A Look at Los Angeles, uses Adobe Presenter

Recorded presentation (01:21:56)


Transcript of the panel
The Evaluation of NIJ by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences: NIJ's Response
NIJ Conference
Panel
June 2011

The National Academies conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the National Institute of Justice. This panel provides an overview of the evaluation and NIJ's response to it. NIJ has accepted many of the recommendations in the NRC report, and you will learn what the agency is doing to implement them. A few of the recommendations were challenging and created considerable debate within NIJ. Plans to address these thorny issues also are discussed.

Moderator: Thomas Feucht, Executive Senior Science Advisor, National Institute of Justice
Panelists:
  • Daniel Nagin, Professor of Public Policy and Statistics, Teresa and H. John Heinz III University, Carnegie Mellon University
  • John H. Laub, Director, National Institute of Justice
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Audio recording (1:14:39)

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State Responses to Mass Incarceration
NIJ Conference
Panel
June 2011

Researchers have devoted considerable attention to mass incarceration, specifically its magnitude, costs, and collateral consequences. In the face of economic constraints, strategies to reduce correctional populations while maintaining public safety are becoming a fiscal necessity. This panel will present strategies that states have undertaken to reduce incarceration rates while balancing taxpayer costs with ensuring public safety.

Moderator: Nadine Frederique, Social Science Analyst, National Institute of Justice
Panelists:
  • Jake Horowitz, Manager of the Public Safety Performance Project, The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Marc Levin, Director of the Center for Effective Justice, Texas Public Policy Foundation
  • Ed Rhine, Deputy Director, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
Still image linking to the recorded panel State Responses to Mass Incarceration

Recorded presentation (01:21:31)


Transcript of the panel
Human Factors in Latent Print Examination
NIJ Conference
Panel
June 2011

The NIJ-sponsored Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Latent Print Analysis is clarifying potential sources of error in pattern recognition analysis. It will develop best practices to remove or minimize these sources. NIJ is addressing recommendations in the 2009 National Academy of Sciences' report titled "Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward." Specifically, the panelists focus on recommendation 5, which encourages research programs on human observer bias and sources of human error in forensic examinations.

Moderator: Melissa Taylor, Program Manager, Office of Law Enforcement Standards, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Panelists:
  • Deborah Boehm-Davis, Professor, George Mason University
  • Melissa Gische, Physical Scientist, Latent Print Operations Unit, Federal Bureau of Investigation Laboratory
Still image linking to the recorded panel Human Factors in Latent Print Examination

Recorded presentation (01:04:10)


Transcript of the panel
Date Modified: November 30, 2011