Harvard Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety (2008-2014)

Law enforcement has changed since September 11, 2001. To understand how policing will change in the future, NIJ and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government are collaborating on the second "Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety."

In 2008, NIJ and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government convened the second[1] Executive Session on Policing in response to increasing challenges and complexities confronting law enforcement executives in the 21st century. New questions in law enforcement emerged such as the role of technology in policing, police responses to mass demonstrations or terrorist events, police legitimacy and accountability, as well as the cost of policing in a struggling economy.

In response to these discussions, the second Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety produced a second series of papers in several areas including:

  • Police discipline.
  • Police science.
  • Professionalism of the police. 
  • The changing environment of the police.

Moving forward. As a result of the second Executive Session, NIJ and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government are entering into phase II of the second Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety to extend the discussions of the second Executive Session and explore emerging issues related to policing research, management and policy such as: 

  • Procedural justice in policing.
  • The role of police in reducing incarceration.
  • Race relations inside police agencies.
  • Police/community relations.

Notes

[1] The first Executive Session on Policing took place in the 1980s and helped to create the idea of community policing, which changed the face of law enforcement. The papers from that session have become a foundation for police executive training across the nation.

Date Modified: July 5, 2012