2008 NIJ Conference

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Agenda

Monday, July 21

8:30 a.m.Welcome and Opening Remarks
Kevin J. O'Connor, Associate Attorney General,
U.S. Department of Justice
8:45 a.m.Plenary Panel
More prisons, more prisoners: Time for a policy change?
10:15 a.m.Break
10:30 a.m.Concurrent Panels
12:00 p.m.Break
12:15 p.m.Luncheon and Keynote Speaker
Race, crime and common ground: Lessons from a decade of action research
1:45 p.m.Concurrent Panels
3:15 p.m.Break
3:30 p.m.Concurrent Panels
5:00 p.m.Adjourn

Tuesday, July 22

8:30 a.m.Plenary Panel
Making smarter decisions: Connecting crime mapping with city officials
10:00 a.m.Break
10:15 a.m.Concurrent Panels
11:45 a.m.Break
12:15 p.m. Luncheon Speaker and Special Recognition
1:30 p.m.Break
1:45 p.m.Concurrent Panels
3:15 p.m.Break
3:30 p.m.Concurrent Panels
5:00 p.m.Adjourn

Wednesday, July 23

9:00 a.m.Concurrent Panels
10:30 a.m.Break
10:45 a.m.Concurrent Panels
12:15 p.m.Break
12:30 p.m.Luncheon and Keynote Presentation
Wrongfully convicted: The road to truth
2:00 p.m.Concurrent Panels
3:30 p.m.Conference Adjourns

2008 Panel Descriptions

Luncheon Speakers

Monday: "Race, crime, and common ground: Lessons from a decade of action research." David Kennedy, Director of the Center for Crime Prevention and Control at John Jay College, will reflect on the evolving crime prevention framework that began in 1996 with the "Boston Miracle" and has expanded to new crime problems such as drug markets and come to feature an explicit and pragmatic focus on race, conflict between communities and law enforcement, offender norms, and especially the 'moral voice' of communities.

Tuesday: Luncheon Speaker and Special Recognition. Jeffrey L. Sedgwick, Acting Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs and NIJ Director David W. Hagy will describe how research and evaluation has affected policy and practice during their tenure.

Wednesday: "Wrongfully convicted: The road to truth." Panelists will discuss the importance of evidence preservation, the integrity of the justice system and the road to truth.

  • Dwayne Allen Dail, 207th person exonerated by DNA evidence
  • Christine Mumma, Dail’s Attorney and Executive Director, North Carolina Center on Actual Innocence, Durham, N.C.
  • Janet Reno (invited), Former Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: David W. Hagy, Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Plenaries

Making smarter decisions: Connecting crime mapping with city officials. When you combine numbers and geography, you can make your city a better place. Come to this plenary to see how places like Redlands, Calif.; Lincoln, Neb.; and Lexington, Ky, are mixing, matching and melding data and maps to predict where crime might happen next — and then working with city administrators and urban planners to prevent it.

  • Tom Casady, Chief of Police, Lincoln, Neb.
  • Kurt Smith, San Diego County Sheriff’s Department, San Diego, Calif.
  • Derek J. Paulsen, Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director, Department of Criminal Justice and Police Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Ky.
  • Michele R. Hummel, Director, Central Business Improvement District, Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Moderator: John S. Morgan, Deputy Director for Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

More prisons, more prisoners: Time for a policy change? Prisons are bursting at the seams. The number of people incarcerated has grown sixfold in 35 years. Many states need to build more prisons. But they don't have enough money, and they aren't sure prisons are the most effective way to keep their communities safe. What are the alternatives?

  • Michael P. Jacobson, Director, Vera Institute of Justice, New York, N.Y.
  • Dora D. Schriro, Director, Arizona Department of Corrections, Phoenix, Ariz.
  • Dennis O’Brien, Speaker of the House, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Moderator: Reginald A. Wilkinson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Ohio College Access Network, Columbus, Ohio

General Sessions

Analyzing neighborhood characteristics and crime patterns. Debate continues about the impact that urban sprawl and infill development have on crime and the stability of communities. Panelists will describe how analysts use geographic information systems and local data to determine what impact development will have on crime. They will also discuss “broken windows policing” — a strategy that suggests fighting minor signs of decay, such as graffiti and litter, may help prevent more serious crimes — in examining the relationship among vacant housing, neighborhood crime rates and community characteristics.

  • Rick Jones, Graduate Student, College of Justice and Safety, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Ky.
  • Michael Bess, Senior Management Analyst, Research, Planning and Analysis Division, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, Charlotte, N.C.
  • Erin Dalton, Deputy Director, Allegheny County Department of Human Services, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • Moderator: Louis Tuthill, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Are you talking to the person you are looking at? Law enforcement personnel must be able to confirm a person’s identity at the scene, both for their own safety and for that of the public. Panelists will discuss an NIJ-funded effort by the Los Angeles Police Department to evaluate a handheld device that scans a person’s face and sends these images digitally for comparison against a centralized database. Another collaborative effort with the International Justice & Public Safety Network is developing an interstate capacity to share driver’s license photos. Findings from these efforts are intended to lead to the widespread adoption of means for law enforcement to verify the identities of individuals at the scene.

  • Pam Scanlon, Executive Director, Automated Regional Justice Information System, San Diego, Calif.
  • Raj Nanavati, Founding Partner, International Biometric Group; Director, National Sensors, Surveillance, and Biometric Technologies Center of Excellence, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Northeast, Rome, N.Y.
  • Bonnie Locke, Director of Program Management, Nlets — the International Justice and Public Safety Network, Phoenix, Ariz.
  • Moderator: William Ford, Acting Chief, Information and Sensor Technology Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Cell phone forensics: Catching the bad guys in the age of mobile technology. With the ubiquity of the cell phone, today’s criminals are leaving behind evidence of their crimes on devices that they often carry with them (e.g., cell phones, BlackBerrys®, PDAs). Evidence on these devices includes pictures, contact lists, global positioning system information and call logs. This information can be used to determine whom a suspect called as well as when and where he or she made the call. Pictures are useful because suspects often keep photos of their deeds as trophies. Panelists will present findings from two NIJ-funded studies that developed new ways for law enforcement to access evidence from mobile technology and bring suspects to justice.

  • Bill Jeitner, President, BK Forensics, Warrington, Pa.
  • Scott Sotack, Trooper, Pennsylvania State Police, West Hazleton, Pa.
  • Moderator: Martin Novak, Physical Scientist, Information and Sensor Technology Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The changing face of public housing: Mapping new crime patterns. When public housing residents are relocated, what is the impact on crime, housing value and general neighborhood stability? Panelists will explore these questions using findings from an evaluation of the HOPE VI projects in Lexington, Ky., Milwaukee, Wis., and Washington, D.C. Panelists also will discuss a study of the dynamic landscape of post-Katrina neighborhoods using a spatial video encoded with a global positioning system signal that can capture, map, analyze and render urban characteristics associated with crime.

  • Derek J. Paulsen, Associate Professor, College of Justice and Safety, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Ky.
  • Meagan Cahill, Research Associate, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Andrew Curtis, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Moderator: Louis Tuthill, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Commercial exploitation and human trafficking: Identifying victims and reducing demand. Although human trafficking has gained more recognition in recent years, identifying victims, investigating cases and prosecuting perpetrators continue to hold many challenges for state and local law enforcement. This panel will present findings from two NIJ-funded studies. The first study compared federally funded human trafficking task forces to jurisdictions that do not receive funding, specifically how each group defined human trafficking, located victims and charged offenders. The second project evaluated a diversion program in San Francisco that offered selected first-time offenders the opportunity to participate in a day-long intervention instead of facing prosecution. The evaluation found that the program reduced recidivism.

  • Amy Farrell, Assistant Professor, College of Criminal Justice; Associate Director, Institute on Race and Justice, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass.
  • Mike Shively, Senior Associate, Abt Associates Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
  • Jane Nady Sigmon, Senior Coordinator for International Programs, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC): Pathways and prosecution. Commercial sexual exploitation of children is a widespread problem. Over the past few years, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and NIJ have supported programs and research to address this issue and to understand how law enforcement and victim service agencies are responding to it. Panelists will present findings from two of these projects, including risk factors, prevention, early intervention and prosecutorial efforts, as well as findings from a focus group of practitioners who work with sexually exploited youth. 

  • Mark Edberg, Director of Qualitative Research, Development Services Group, Inc., Bethesda, Md.
  • William Adams, Research Associate, Federal Justice Statistics Resource Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Bradley Myles, Deputy Director, Polaris Project, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Jeffrey Gersh, Program Manager, Child Protection Division, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

CompStat, community policing and the diffusion of innovation. Community policing (CP) and CompStat (CS) are powerful engines of police reform. Many police organizations have found that some elements of the two are compatible, whereas others are not. Panelists will discuss new research that identifies how CP and CS are implemented, problems and opportunities encountered, and the potential benefits of integrating the two. Another study assesses how journals, government reports and professional associations serve as outlets for disseminating innovations that influence organizational change and CP implementation. A practitioner will offer useful insights from personal observations and experiences in the diffusion of innovation in law enforcement at both the national and local levels.

  • James Willis, Assistant Professor, Administration of Justice Department, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
  • Matthew Giblin, Assistant Professor, Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency and Corrections, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Ill.
  • Ellen Scrivner, Director, John Jay Leadership Academy, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Matthew C. Scheider, Assistant Director, Program/Policy Support and Evaluation Division, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Conducted-energy devices: Controversial alternative to use of deadly force. Many health and safety issues surround the use of conducted-energy devices (CEDs), such as TASERs®, which have become the preferred alternative to the use of lethal force. CEDs offer law enforcement a unique capability: no other less-lethal device can immediately incapacitate an individual. Although most research indicates that CEDs are safe and effective when used properly on healthy adults, CED use has resulted in some bad outcomes. NIJ is funding research intended to improve use protocols and the understanding of CEDs. Panelists will address physiological issues in individuals exposed to CEDs and outcomes of less-lethal devices in reducing injuries to officers and suspects.

  • Charlie Mesloh, Assistant Professor and Director, Weapons and Equipment Research Institute, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, Fla.
  • Cynthia Bir, Associate Professor, College of Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich.
  • William Bozeman, Associate Director of Research and Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C.
  • Moderator: Joe Cecconi, General Engineer, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Crime analysis and policing: Implementing new technologies. Technological innovations help law enforcement work more efficiently, but integrating new technologies is not always easy. Panelists will present results from a national survey about crime analysis/mapping and its integration with patrol. They will discuss promising practices and remaining barriers. Panelists will also discuss automated vehicle locator (AVL) technology and how AVL data, along with a comprehensive analysis plan, can help improve deployment patterns.

  • Nicole J. Scalisi, Research Analyst, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Greg Jones, Research and Crime Mapping Coordinator, Police Foundation, Washington, D.C.
  • Bobby Hubbs, Lieutenant, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Cutting-edge research on incarceration, alternatives and reentry: A report from abroad. High-level institute directors from criminal justice research agencies overseas will present data from innovative research on prisons, prison populations, community supervision, reentry and alternatives to incarceration. A comparative discussion of evidence, policies and corrections practices will also be offered. The panel will focus on “what works” around the world in criminal justice practice and policy.

  • David Turner, Director of Research, Evaluation and Modeling, Ministry of Justice, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Stephen Mihorean, Director, Research and Statistics Division, Department of Justice Canada, Ottawa, Canada
  • TBD
  • Moderator: Cindy Smith, Chief, International Center, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Detecting concealed weapons with millimeter wave technology. Concealed weapons are typically discovered using a portal system that detects metallic objects, but such systems cannot detect nonmetallic weapons and require close proximity to and the cooperation of the individual being scanned. Millimeter wave (MMW) technology presents a potential solution to these shortcomings. Panelists will discuss the concealed weapons detection needs of the law enforcement and corrections communities and describe the pros and cons of NIJ-funded projects representing three different technical approaches: the Brijot Passive MMW Technology stand-off system, the L-3 SafeView ProVision™ 100-MMW active portal and commercial off-the-shelf auto collision avoidance radars.

  • Chris McAleavey, Deputy Director, Sensors, Surveillance, and Biometric Technologies Center of Excellence, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Northeast, Rome, N.Y.
  • Nick Paulter, Program Manager, Office of Law Enforcement Standards, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • Osborne Frazier, Administrative School Security Manager, New York Police Department, New York, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Frances J. Scott, Physical Scientist, Information and Sensor Technology Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

DNA tools for tomorrow (Part 1). In recent years, scientific and technological research has advanced rapidly. But forensic scientists know that to take advantage of technological innovations, they must harness and adapt such innovations to use in the crime lab. As part of ongoing efforts to bring cutting-edge technologies to the forensic community, NIJ continues to support DNA research designed to provide long-term solutions to everyday challenges. Panelists will present NIJ's newest DNA research and development projects, which focus on the development of improved methods for examining sexual assault evidence, exploration of novel tools to repair damaged DNA evidence, determination of the species of origin in biological evidence and integrated miniaturized devices for analyzing forensic DNA markers.

  • John R. Battista, Mary Lou Applewhite Professor of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, La.
  • Greggory S. LaBerge, Scientific Director and Bureau Commander, Denver Police Department Crime Laboratory, Colo.
  • James W. Schumm, Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President, Bode Technology Group, Lorton, Va.
  • Moderator: Lois Tully, Deputy Chief, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

DNA tools for tomorrow (Part 2). In recent years, scientific and technological research has advanced rapidly. But forensic scientists know that to take advantage of technological innovations, they must harness and adapt such innovations to use in the crime lab. As part of ongoing efforts to bring cutting-edge technologies to the forensic community, NIJ continues to support DNA research designed to provide long-term solutions to everyday challenges. Panelists will present NIJ's newest DNA research and development projects, which focus on the development of improved methods for examining sexual assault evidence, exploration of novel tools to repair damaged DNA evidence, determination of the species of origin in biological evidence and integrated miniaturized devices for analyzing forensic DNA markers.

  • Jack Ballantyne, Associate Professor, National Center for Forensic Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • Phil Belgrader, Vice President of Research and Development, Akonni Biosystems, Frederick, Md.
  • Eugene Tan, Vice President of Product Development, Network Biosystems, Ottawa, Mass.
  • Moderator: Lois Tully, Deputy Chief, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Do protection orders effectively protect victims? Enforcing protection orders is a critical component of maintaining the safety of victims of domestic abuse. This session will present results from two NIJ studies on protection order enforcement. One study investigated the impact of intensive protection order enforcement on offender and victim behavior. The second identified factors associated with the effectiveness of protective order enforcement and assessed justice system costs related to partner violence, protective orders and differential responses to protective order violations.

  • Angela R. Gover, Associate Professor, School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado at Denver, Colo.
  • T.K. Logan, Professor, Department of Behavioral Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
  • Teri Faragher, Executive Director, Domestic Violence Prevention Board, Lexington, Ky.
  • Moderator: Bernie Auchter, Senior Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Economists study forensic science: The state of forensics in the United States. The panel will discuss several NIJ-funded studies that together provide a broad view of the state of forensics in the United States. West Virginia University led two studies: the Foresight Project was the first crime lab benchmarking study to determine sample throughput, hours per case, items per case, etc., and the Survey of Non-Crime Laboratory Forensic Service Providers was the first to quantify forensic activities that occur outside of the traditional crime lab, such as latent prints development and police department crime scene investigations. Participants will also explain how viewing forensic science as a business can affect laboratory efficiency.

  • Paul Speaker, Associate Professor, Finance Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, W.Va.
  • Randy Childs, Economist, Bureau of Business and Economic Research, West Virginia University, Morgantown, W.Va.
  • Dean Gialamas, Director, Forensic Science Services Division, Orange County Sheriff’s Department, Santa Ana, Calif.
  • Moderator: John Paul Jones, Physical Scientist, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Enhancing program implementation fidelity: Results from two school-based prevention programs. Without implementation fidelity, a true program evaluation cannot be accomplished. Researchers use various strategies to assess this important factor. Panelists will present results from two NIJ-funded evaluations focused on the extent to which school-based prevention programs were implemented in a number of sites. The Teens, Crime and Community Works program and the Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) program share a number of characteristics, but researchers noted very different levels of implementation. Panelists will identify and discuss factors that contribute to these differences and strategies for enhancing adherence to a program model.

  • Finn-Age Esbensen, E. Desmond Lee Professor of Youth Crime and Violence, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Mo.
  • Christopher Melde, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Raj Ramnarace, Lieutenant, La Crosse Police Department, La Crosse, Wis.
  • Moderator: Cathy Girouard, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Federal consent decrees: The good, the bad and the future. Meetings of the Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety are designed to elaborate new conceptual frameworks that might help guide the development of missions and effective strategies in policing and public safety. Panelists will report on the January 2008 inaugural meeting of the Executive Session, which was cohosted by NIJ and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

  • William Bratton, Chief, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Ronald Davis, Chief, East Palo Alto Police Department, East Palo Alto, Calif.
  • Christopher Stone, Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Professor of the Practice of Criminal Justice, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
  • Moderator: Christine Cole, Executive Director, Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Federal resources for crime laboratories. Panelists will discuss the latest training courses, technology evaluations, forensic studies and numerous free resources available from NIJ's forensic resource network, the forensic Technology Center of excellence and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Panelists will discuss how to obtain these resources and how they can assist crime laboratory personnel.

  • Terry W. Fenger, Director, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, Huntington, W.Va.
  • Kevin L. Lothridge, Deputy Executive Director, National Forensic Science Technology Center, Largo, Fla.
  • John M. Butler, Research Chemist and Project Leader, DNA Measurements Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • Moderator: John Paul Jones, Physical Scientist, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Forensic anthropology and its role in death investigations. Forensic anthropology plays a critical role in the identification of human remains by examining the structure and properties of bones and teeth. Forensic anthropologists use their specialized knowledge to determine the gender, approximate age, physical stature and likely race of a deceased person. Their examinations can also yield the approximate time that has elapsed since death, likely cause of death, and any identifying illnesses or wounds suffered in life that could leave traces in the bone structure. Panelists will discuss how technology has improved the accuracy of anthropological analyses and present case files to give the audience a glimpse into the world of forensic anthropology.

  • Anthony B. Falsetti, Director, C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory; Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
  • Thomas D. Holland, Director, U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory, Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Moderator: Mark Nelson, Senior Program Manager, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Forensic science demonstrations/poster session. DNA researchers will present their tools and recent findings through technology demonstrations and posters. Crime laboratory practitioners who receive support under NIJ's DNA backlog reduction and capacity enhancement programs will present posters on such topics as success stories, improved laboratory efficiency and technology solutions to routinely encountered challenges. The session will also provide a forum for interaction and discussion among researchers, practitioners and conference participants with an interest in forensic science.

  • Marc W. Allard, Louis Weintraub Associate Professor of Biology (and Genetics), George Washington University, Washington, D.C.
  • Jack Ballantyne, Associate Professor, National Center for Forensic Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • Carl A. Batt, Liberty Hyde Bailey Professor, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.
  • Robert A. Bever, Vice President of Research, Bode Technology Group, Lorton, Va.
  • Eric Buel, Director, Vermont Forensic Laboratory, Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, Vt.
  • Cassandra D. Calloway, Assistant Staff Scientist, Children’s Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Calif.
  • Michael D. Coble, Chief, Research Section, Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rockville, Md.
  • Phillip B. Danielson, Professor of Molecular Biology, University of Denver; Science Advisor, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Rocky Mountain Region, Colo.
  • Tracey Dawson Cruz, Graduate Director, Department of Forensic Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Va.
  • Ronald W. DeBry, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Michael Gaitan, Project Leader, Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Project, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • Erin K. Hanson, Senior Research Scientist, National Center for Forensic Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • Steven A. Hofstadler, Vice President of Research, Ibis Biosciences, Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, Calif.
  • Kevin Legg, Researcher, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, Colo.
  • Richard Li, Assistant Professor in Forensic Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Peng Liu, Doctoral Student, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.
  • Christopher R. Lloyd, Director of Research and Development, MicroBioSystems, LP, North Logan, Utah
  • John R. Nelson, Project Leader, Biosciences, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, N.Y.
  • Janice A. Nicklas, Chemist, Vermont Forensic Laboratory, Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, Vt.
  • Jessica Voorhees Norris, Doctoral Student, Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.
  • Kerry L. Opel, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Chemistry, Florida International University, Miami, Fla.
  • Andrew J. Pakstis, Research Scientist, Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.
  • Linda D. Strausbaugh, Professor of Genetics and Genomics and Director, Center for Applied Genetics and Technology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn.
  • Mark Timken, Senior Criminalist, Jan Bashinski DNA Laboratory, California Department of Justice, Richmond, Calif.
  • Bradley Tom, Graduate Student, Forensic Science Graduate Group, University of California, Davis, Calif.

Free technology to help solve missing and unidentified decedent cases. At any time, there are approximately 100,000 missing people in the United States and an estimated 40,000 unidentified dead waiting to be identified. Panelists will highlight the latest advances that can be used to help solve such cases, including NIJ’s National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs); mitochondrial DNA testing, which leverages the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS); and policy and statistical findings from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Census of Medical Examiners and Coroners’ Offices. They will also describe how these free technologies can enhance the ability of investigators to solve these difficult cases and explain how to obtain these services.

  • Art Eisenberg, Director, DNA Identity Laboratory, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Texas
  • Kristen Hughes, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Law and Justice, Alexandria, Va.
  • Randy Hanzlick, Professor of Forensic Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine; Chief Medical Examiner, Fulton County, Ga.
  • Moderator: John Paul Jones, Physical Scientist, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Gang intervention and enforcement in Chicago. Panelists will highlight evaluation findings from two studies of Chicago-based efforts to reduce violent crime and gang activity. The Chicago CeaseFire program works to change community norms and acceptance of violence through community engagement and outreach to high-risk and gang-involved youth. Panelists will also present findings from the Chicago Police Department’s “hot spots” policing activities.

  • Susan Hartnett, Associate Director, Center for Data Collection and Analysis, College Sports Project, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill.
  • Amie M. Schuck, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago, Ill.
  • Candice M. Kane, Chief Operating Officer, Chicago Project for Violence Prevention, University of Illinois at Chicago, Ill.
  • Moderator: Phelan Wyrick, Senior Technology Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Ganging up on youth gangs: Best practices to shut them down. The panel will summarize evaluation findings and lessons learned from two youth gang research projects: Evaluation of the Gang Free Schools Initiative and Evaluation of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s Gang Reduction Program. Presenters will also discuss a new “best practices” publication developed by the National Youth Gang Center.

  • David Hayeslip, Senior Research Associate, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • James “Buddy” Howell, Senior Research Associate, National Youth Gang Center, Tallahassee, Fla.
  • Esther Welch Anderson, Director, Richmond Gang Reduction and Intervention Program, Virginia Attorney General’s Office, Richmond, Va.
  • Moderator: Robert Flores, Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Geography, neighborhoods and crime. Understanding why crime occurs in some neighborhoods and not others is important. Panelists will highlight two NIJ-funded grants that demonstrate geographic characteristics as possible explanations for crime in neighborhoods. The first grant discusses the impact of posted Neighborhood Watch signs on perceived likelihood of victimization and criminality in a community. The second grant discusses the impact of broken windows policing on the actual and perceived level of misconduct in neighborhoods, its effect on the fear of crime and perceptions of police legitimacy in targeted areas, and its possible impact on crime during the study period. A captain from the Chicago Police Department will talk about his views of neighborhood effects on crime.

  • P. Wesley Schultz, Professor of Psychology, California State University, San Marcos, Calif.
  • David Weisburd, Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice and Director, Institute of Criminology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Distinguished Professor of Administration of Justice, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
  • Marc Buslik, Captain, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, Ill.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Guns and crime: Mapping patterns and preventing violence. Operation Ceasefire in Nassau County, N.Y. is a problem-oriented policing intervention to reduce youth homicide and gang violence. Panelists will explain the process of designing and implementing this program. GangStat is another multilayered approach to crime reduction that employs geographic information systems to characterize, target and eliminate gangs and organized criminal enterprises in Miami-Dade County. Panelists will discuss the program’s implementation in support of intelligence-led policing efforts.

  • Christopher R. Herrmann, Adjunct Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, N.Y.
  • Shellie E. Solomon, Chief Executive Officer, Justice & Security Strategies, Inc., Hallandale Beach, Fla.
  • Douglas J. Wiebe, Assistant Professor, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Moderator: Winifred L. Reed, Chief, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Hidden abuse: Mistreatment of the elderly in residential care. The panel will provide an expansive look at elder mistreatment in residential care facilities (RCFs). The first presentation focuses on programs designed to detect, prevent, investigate and prosecute abuse, with an emphasis on the roles played by state licensing agencies, adult protective services and the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. The second presentation examines resident-on-resident abuse, the most common reason for police involvement in RCFs. Panelists will describe barriers to the detection and prevention of elder mistreatment and report on promising new “smart practices” to combat abuse. 

  • Catherine Hawes, Regents Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, Texas
  • Karen Boyles, Manager, Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program, Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Atlanta, Ga.
  • Anthony E. Rosen, Medical Student, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Hotbeds of radicalization in contemporary American society. Since September 11, 2001, terrorism has become synonymous with Islamic extremism, yet this narrow response creates large gaps in our national security. Domestic extremist groups have been overlooked as a potential source of terror within our own boundaries. Panelists will explore the structure and operation of these groups and the process of recruiting new members. They will also discuss efforts by the National Joint Terrorism Task Force Correctional Intelligence Initiative to build effective partnerships between law enforcement and corrections to detect, deter and disrupt efforts by extremist groups to radicalize or recruit within our prison populations.

  • Pete Simi, Assistant Professor, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Nebraska-Omaha, Neb.
  • Michael L. Rulo, Inspector General, Colorado Department of Corrections, Colorado Springs, Colo.
  • John Marsh, Intelligence Specialist, U.S. Attorney’s Office, Middle District of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, Pa.
  • Moderator: Jack O. Harne, Physical Scientist, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

International perspectives on neighborhood policing. Neighborhood policing strategies vary according to each community's characteristics. Following the success of a small-scale pilot program, a three-year neighborhood Policing Program (NPP) commenced in April 2005 in the U.K. Panelists will discuss the results of the pilot program's evaluation and its impact on the development of policing policy, along with early findings from the NPP evaluation. Panelists will then turn to the U.S., examining the impact of the neighborhood environment on police decision making and policing outcomes. They will review current research in this area and suggest implications for American police departments.

  • Paul Wiles, Director of Research Development and Statistics, Home Office, U.K.
  • Stephen D. Mastrofski, University Professor and Chair, Department of Administration of Justice, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
  • Roger B. Parks, Emeritus Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind.
  • Moderator: Winifred L. Reed, Chief, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Less-lethal technology and police use of force. How does the use of less-lethal technology affect police use of force outcomes, such as injuries to officers, suspects and bystanders; lawsuits; and workers’ compensation claims? Panelists will report preliminary results from ongoing studies in NIJ’s policing research portfolio that examine the role of less-lethal technology and its effect on police use of force outcomes.

  • William Terrill, Associate Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Geoff P. Alpert, Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.
  • Joshua A. Ederheimer, Assistant Chief of Police, Metropolitan Police Department, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Brett Chapman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Locating and tracking the good guys. The ability to locate and track assets in real time is essential to a law enforcement agency’s ability to respond to and prevent incidents. A panelist from the NIJ Communications Technologies Center of Excellence will discuss law enforcement requirements in this area, and other panelists will discuss issues from the technical and practitioner’s view based on a pilot project in Los Angeles County, Calif.

  • Alan Kaplan, Chief Technology Officer, Drakontas, LLC, Glenside, Pa.
  • Peter F. Small, Program Manager, Drakontas, LLC, Glenside, Pa.
  • Richard Adams, Commander, Technical Services Division, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, Monterey Park, Calif.
  • Moderator: Joseph F. Heaps, Deputy Chief, Information and Sensor Technology Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Longitudinal research on crime and delinquency: Lessons concerning early childhood and transitions to adult roles. NIJ efforts to synthesize findings from recent longitudinal studies of crime and delinquency led to a new book. “The Long View of Crime” summarizes findings on topics including street gangs, work and crime, and the effects of arrest and criminal justice sanctions, which were presented in prior years. This year’s panel will provide an overview of the volume and then discuss what we have learned about two aspects of the life course of crime, namely early childhood risk and the development of delinquency, and the effect on crime of transitions from adolescent to adult roles.

  • D. Wayne Osgood, Professor, Crime, Law and Justice Program, Department of Sociology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa.
  • Daniel Shaw, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • Vincent N. Schiraldi, Director, District of Columbia Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Akiva Liberman, Program Official, Services Research Branch, Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.

New research on methamphetamine production and use. Recognizing methamphetamine as one of the nation’s drug priorities, NIJ and other agencies have invested in research examining its production and other issues. Researchers will present findings from NIJ’s grant on precursor chemical control policies and practice and from the Office of National Drug Control Policy’s Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program on methamphetamine markets and use. A representative of the Indiana Methamphetamine Abuse Task Force will discuss the law enforcement experience and comment on research findings.

  • Dana Hunt, Principal Scientist, Abt Associates Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
  • Duane McBride, Professor of Sociology and Chair, Behavioral Sciences Department; Director, Institute for Prevention of Addictions, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Mich.
  • Matt Bilkey, First Sergeant, Indiana State Police, Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Moderator: Linda Truitt, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

New tools to stop child exploitation over the Internet. Child exploitation over the Internet continues to be a serious concern for law enforcement. One only needs to view NBC’s “To Catch a Predator” to understand the extent of the problem in our society. Fortunately, NIJ is developing tools to help law enforcement analyze the evidence gathered in cases of child exploitation. Panelists will discuss several of these tools, including File Marshal, which detects and analyzes the use of peer-to-peer software; File Hound, which scans, catalogs and reports contraband images; and Automated Human Image Detection, which detects high concentrations of skin tones in image files and marks those files for subsequent manual investigation.

  • Marcus Rogers, Chair, Cyber Forensics Program, Department of Computer and Information Technology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.
  • Frank Adelstein, Technical Director of Computer Security, Architecture Technology Corp.-New York, Ithaca, N.Y.
  • Larry C. Turner, Commander, Criminal Investigation Division, Indiana State Police, Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Moderator: Martin Novak, Physical Scientist, Information and Sensor Technology Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Parolee supervision strategies that result in successful outcomes. What facilitates an offender’s successful completion of community supervision? In 2005, NIJ awarded two grants to better answer this question. One project in Georgia analyzed daily parolee-officer transactions for almost 40,000 parolees to identify patterns that predict parole outcomes. The second project examined the causes and consequences of parole violations and revocations in California for 120,000 offenders on parole during 2003 and 2004. The combined results offer the field valuable lessons on optimal community supervision strategies and answer the important question of whether technical violations can predict new criminal acts.

  • Tammy Meredith, co-Founder, Applied Research Services, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.
  • John P. Prevost, Assistant Director, Research, Evaluation and Technology Unit, Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles, Atlanta, Ga.
  • Ryken Grattet, Professor, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, Calif.
  • Moderator: Marlene Beckman, Senior Program Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Police fatigue and officer performance. This panel will report findings from several NIJ-funded studies that are examining the role of officer health on police performance. The projects are all near completion and constitute an important part of NIJ's investment in its policing research portfolio. The findings to be discussed are particularly relevant to police practitioners because of the relationship between shift work schedules and officer health and their impact on police performance and safety.

  • Karen L. Amendola, Chief Operating Officer, Division of Research, Evaluation and Professional Services, Police Foundation, Washington, D.C.
  • Gail Wilson-Turner, Commander, Detroit Police Department, Detroit, Mich.
  • Steven W. Lockley, Associate Neuroscientist, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Assistant Professor, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
  • Moderator: Brett Chapman, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Policy changes in the juvenile justice system from inside and out. The National Juvenile Court Data Archive collects official record data on many aspects of the juvenile justice system and provides important information for policymakers. A recent study by the Urban Institute surveyed juvenile court practitioners on their thoughts regarding recent policy changes affecting the system — a perspective that is rarely sought. Findings from the study suggest that practitioners, in general, support more rehabilitative policies, a contradiction to many recent punitive policy changes. Panelists will discuss the policy implications of what we’ve learned from all these data as well as current trends among offenders and juvenile justice system processing.

  • Janeen Buck Willison, Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Melissa Sickmund, Chief of Systems Research, National Center for Juvenile Justice, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • TBD
  • Moderator: Katherine Browning, Senior Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Post-Lunch Panel—Race, Crime and Common Ground: Lessons From a Decade of Action Research. Panelists will continue the conversation generated by David Kennedy's Monday luncheon remarks. They will relate their personal experiences with race, conflict between communities and law enforcement, offender norms, and especially the “moral voice” of communities.

  • James Fealy, Chief, High Point Police Department, High Point, N.C.
  • Sherman Mason, Reverend, Greater New Hope Baptist Church, High Point, N.C.
  • Jerry Mingo, President, Burns Hill Neighborhood Association, High Point, N.C.
  • Moderator: David Kennedy, Director, Center for Crime Prevention and Control, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, N.Y.

Post-release supervision and residential choice. Keeping track of released offenders can be a difficult job. New tools to predict and monitor offender movements are being developed. Panelists will describe a model for predicting the residential decisions of registered sex offenders, a geographically enabled communication tool for sharing knowledge about offenders and a Web-based geospatial application to help agencies better supervise and assist returning prisoners.

  • Jim Lucht, Director of Information and Technology, The Providence Plan, Providence, R.I.
  • Phil Mielke, Geographic Information System Analyst and Research Coordinator, Redlands Police Department, Redlands, Calif.
  • Elizabeth Mack, Doctoral Student, Department of Geography, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind.
  • Moderator: Winifred L. Reed, Chief, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Practical applications of prison rape prevalence data. Prior to the passage of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003, little was known about state efforts by departments of corrections to combat the issue and make institutions safer for both inmates and staff. Since then, NIJ and other federal agencies have engaged in programs and research to address prison rape. Data from the "Large County Jails Situational Crime Prevention Study" will be presented. This research examines jail management characteristics and design, interviews inmates and staff, and recommends how changing organizational behavior can improve safety. Also presented will be findings from the National Inmate Survey, 2007, including characteristics of perpetrators and victims.

  • Paige M. Harrison, Statistician, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Nancy G. La Vigne, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Tara H. Wildes, Chief, Jails Division, Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, Jacksonville, Fla.
  • Moderator: Andrew Goldberg, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Pretrial release and jail detention. The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) recently released a report on trends in pretrial release between 1990 and 2004, using a representative sample of felony cases filed in the largest U.S. counties. BJS will present descriptive information and statistical findings on pretrial release versus detention decisions and on pretrial misconduct (e.g., failure to appear and behavior leading to rearrest). An NIJ Data Resources Program grantee will present results from a study, which combined BJS and other data, on the influence of Latino/Hispanic origin on pretrial release status and bail setting, as a function of population trends. A pretrial service representative will discuss these findings from a policy and practice perspective.

  • Thomas Cohen, Statistician, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • David Levin, Senior Research Associate, Pretrial Justice Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Rick Peck, Director, Pretrial Services, Pima County, Tucson, Ariz.
  • Moderator: Linda Truitt, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Preventing campus rape: NIJ study offers new data. What new information exists about the nature and reporting of different types of rape on campus? A recent NIJ-funded project looks at how the type of past victimization (forced or incapacitated) relates to the risk of future victimization. In addition to presenting data from this study, the panel will discuss the role physical or verbal resistance to rape has on the completion of the act and the health outcomes for the survivor. These topics are relevant to the development and implementation of rape prevention education programs on campuses and in communities. 

  • Christopher P. Krebs, Senior Research Social Scientist, Center for Crime, Violence and Justice Research, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Sarah E. Ullman, Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago, Ill.
  • Dan Esparza, Training and Technical Assistance Specialist, California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, Sacramento, Calif.
  • Moderator: Bethany Backes, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Program updates from NIJ’s Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division and the FBI. Representatives from NIJ's investigative and forensic sciences division will provide updates on NIJ's forensic science programs, solicitations and the FY 2008 budget. An FBI representative will discuss updates to the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS).

  • IFSD Program Management Staff
  • Douglas Hares, NDIS Custodian, CODIS Unit, FBI, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Lois Tully, Deputy Chief, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Promising prisoner reentry findings and opportunities for success. A scientist from RTI International will discuss preliminary findings of the Serious & Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI) showing that participants do moderately better on most outcome measures. “Entrepreneurial reentry” — creating partnerships between correctional agencies and microenterprises to help offenders avoid the many employment barriers they typically face — is spreading rapidly across the United States to Canada and England. A John Jay College of Criminal Justice researcher will discuss opportunities for using it to facilitate reentry and skepticism about this strategy. The founder of the Texas Prison Entrepreneurship Program will introduce another of these reentry efforts and discuss outcomes thus far.

  • Christy A. Visher, Principal Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Catherine Rohr, Founder and Executive Director, Prison Entrepreneurship Program, Houston, Texas
  • Lee Bunton, Graduate, Prison Entrepreneurship Program, Houston, Texas
  • Moderator: Laurie Bright, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Protecting the practitioner from evolving threats. Assault weapons, clandestine lab chemicals and weapons of mass destruction — law enforcement practitioners have become the first responders in increasingly dangerous environments. Panelists will address current and new NIJ standards designed to assist in keeping practitioners safe from evolving threats. They will present major revisions to the NIJ Ballistic Resistance of Personal Body Armor Standard; the Body Armor Compliance Testing Program; and NIJ’s development of a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Ensemble Standard that, for the first time, will address the needs and requirements of law enforcement practitioners.

  • Kirk Rice, Program Manager, Office of Law Enforcement Standards, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Md.
  • Edward Allen, Emergency Management Coordinator, Seminole County Sheriff’s Office, Sanford, Fla.
  • Lance Miller, Director, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-National, Rockville, Md.
  • Moderator: Debra Stoe, Physical Scientist, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Rail and port security: Protecting critical infrastructure. Protecting critical infrastructure is key to the nation’s survival in another terrorist attack. Recent bombings in Spain and London brought much needed attention to rail vulnerability and passenger safety. The discussion will first center on the framework developed for cost-effective protection of our nation’s passenger railways, stations and facilities, and second, on securing America’s 185 seaports. Terrorist attacks would not only cripple international trade; most ports are in major population centers with extensive transportation networks, increasing their attractiveness as targets. Protecting these ports requires the collaboration of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies with private and corporate security firms.

  • Jeremy M. Wilson, Associate Director, Center on Quality Policing, RAND Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • Bruce Taylor, Director of Research, Police Executive Research Forum, Washington, D.C.
  • Gregory Hull, Director of Security and Operations Support, American Public Transportation Association, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: Winifred L. Reed, Chief, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Reducing gun and drug-related violence through targeted deterrence. Panelists will present research from Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) enforcement and prosecution activities. First, panelists will highlight results from a series of case studies of U.S. Attorney jurisdictions implementing PSN. They will then discuss evaluation findings from the High Point, N.C., drug interdiction program. These studies review implementation and outcomes of efforts to reduce crime by targeting high-risk offenders and confronting them with serious and certain sanctions, including federal prosecution.

  • Edmund F. McGarrell, Professor and Director, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Duane Deskins, Assistant U.S. Attorney, U.S. Attorney’s Office, Northern District of Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Terry Shelton, Professor, Department of Psychology; Director, Center for Youth, Family and Community Partnerships, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, N.C.
  • Moderator: Phelan Wyrick, Senior Technology Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Sex offender residency restrictions and recidivism. This presentation will highlight zip code based geospatial mapping of sex offenders in urban and rural areas and examine the broad-based effects of sex offender residency restriction laws. Such restrictions have become increasingly widespread over the last few years, giving adjudicated and registered sex offenders fewer places where they can find a home. Practitioners and policymakers will find relevant information on how residency restrictions may affect community safety and sex offender recidivism.

  • Kristen M. Zgoba, Supervisor of Research and Evaluation, New Jersey Department of Corrections, Trenton, N.J.
  • Laura L. Rogers, Director, Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Michael Chajewski, Doctoral Student, Psychometrics Program, Fordham University, Bronx, N.Y.
  • Moderator: Karen Bachar, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Sexual assault nurse examiner programs: Do they boost prosecution rates? Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) programs have added a new dimension to the criminal justice response to sexual assault cases. An NIJ study measured prosecution rates before and after the implementation of a SANE program. Presenters will address the effectiveness of SANE programs on prosecution rates for both acquaintance and stranger rape, as well as on the victims’ participation in prosecution efforts. The session will be of particular interest to those interested in establishing a SANE program in their own community.

  • Rebecca Campbell, Professor of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Debra Patterson, Doctoral Candidate, Ecological/Community Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Kim Day, Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Technical Assistance Coordinator, International Association of Forensic Nurses, Arnold, Md.
  • Moderator: Catherine C. McNamee, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

The social science side of DNA. With advances in technology, DNA evidence has become an increasingly powerful tool for solving crimes. Law enforcement officials use DNA to solve violent crimes and have more recently focused on using DNA to solve cold cases. NIJ is currently exploring the social science side of DNA by investing in major projects. Panelists will present findings from two completed projects: casework evaluation and field experiment. The former provides results of the President’s DNA Initiative funding for major federal programs, and the latter offers lessons learned and outcomes for using DNA in property crimes.

  • John Roman, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C.
  • Dan M. Cantillon, Senior Associate, Caliber Associates, an ICF International Company, Washington, D.C.
  • Gregory Matheson, Director, Criminalistics Laboratory, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Moderator: Katharine Browning, Senior Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Stalking: Moving toward a better understanding of a misunderstood crime. This panel will highlight new research and statistics on stalking in the United States, presenting an NIJ-sponsored study on stalking by Safe Horizons. New data from the National Crime Victimization Survey Stalking Supplement will also be presented. These data will provide the audience with much more in-depth information about stalking than has previously been available. A survivor will recount her experience of being stalked by her husband and describe how the criminal justice system successfully intervened. Her case brought national attention to the issue of using technology to stalk.

  • Michael Rand, Chief, National Crime Victimization Survey Unit, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
  • Patricia Berretty, Member, Research and Evaluation Team, Safe Horizon, New York, N.Y.
  • Sherri Peak, stalking survivor, Spokane, Wash.
  • Deb McGuire, Detective, Kirkland Police Department, Kirkland, Wash.
  • Moderator: Kristina Rose, Senior Advisor to the Director, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

State sentencing guidelines: Implementation and implications. Many states have guidelines that apply the seriousness of the offense and prior criminal history to judicial sentencing decisions, but sentencing guidelines vary widely in design and implementation. This panel profiles an NIJ-funded comparative study of state sentencing guidelines by the National Center for State Courts. Researchers will discuss how sentencing commissions range along a continuum of voluntary to mandatory approaches and present findings from a study on consistency, proportionality and disparity in felony sentences in Michigan, Minnesota and Virginia. A sentencing commission representative and a judge will discuss guideline implementation and implications for court and corrections policies.

  • Charles W. Ostrom, Jr., Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.
  • Lynda Flynt, Director, Alabama Sentencing Commission, Montgomery, Ala.
  • Kevin Burke, Judge, Hennepin County District Court, St. Paul, Minn.
  • Moderator: Linda Truitt, Senior Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Staying one step ahead: Crime forecasting and geographic profiling. The ability to predict the location of a future crime has important implications for preventing criminal activity. Several methods are now available to law enforcement agencies, including the empirical Bayes estimate of the likely origin of crimes committed by a serial offender and Bayesian journey-to-crime analysis. Panelists will also discuss a new algorithm for geographic profiling based on Bayesian statistical methods that makes explicit connections between assumptions about offender behavior and components of the mathematical model as well as investigative strategies using geographic profiling to solve poacher and commuter cases, in which the offender lives outside the crime area.

  • Ned Levine, President, Ned Levine & Associates, Houston, Texas
  • Mike O’Leary, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, Towson University, Towson, Md.
  • Lorie Velarde, Geographic Information System Analyst, Irvine Police Department, Irvine, Calif.
  • Moderator: Ronald E. Wilson, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Stopping contraband at the prison gate. Technology that can effectively detect contraband and prevent it from entering a correctional institution is one of the highest priorities of the correctional community. NIJ is sponsoring an operational evaluation of one such technology — the L-3 SafeView MMW portal — with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. This new technology offers the potential to visualize small non-metallic objects and the ability to see through clothing. Panelists will discuss the evaluation and explore what types of contraband are the most critical to detect and intercept, how they are hidden and potential solutions.

  • Christopher McAleavey, Deputy Director, National Sensors, Surveillance, and Biometric Technologies Center of Excellence, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Northeast, Rome, N.Y.
  • Doug Dretke, Executive Director, Correctional Management Institute of Texas, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas
  • Thomas Dohman, Captain of Internal Security, State Correctional Institution at Graterford, Pa.
  • Moderator: Jack O. Harne, Physical Scientist, Operational Technologies Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Stopping the school-yard bully: Two promising programs. The panel will present evaluations of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, a school climate intervention that is considered a national model, and Bully-Proofing Your School, an extension of the Olweus program that includes a classroom curriculum. Panelists will discuss the programs’ primary recommendations, evaluation findings and their effectiveness in creating a comprehensive culture against bullying.

  • Scott Menard, Professor of Criminal Justice, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas
  • Theodore A. Feinberg, Assistant Executive Director for Professional Development, National Association of School Psychologists, Bethesda, Md.
  • Marlene Snyder, Research Assistant Professor, Institute of Family and Neighborhood Life, Clemson University, S.C.
  • Moderator: Carrie Mulford, Social Science Analyst, Violence and Victimization Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

A study of LA’s BEST (Better Educated Students for Tomorrow) after-school enrichment program. Widespread interest in the impact of after-school programs on youth development has increased dramatically over recent years. Although the short-term impact of programs on academic and social student development has been investigated, research is limited on their long-term effectiveness in lowering juvenile crime rates. This study helps fill that gap, evaluating LA’s BEST — the largest urban-based, after-school program in Los Angeles County — on long-term academic achievement and juvenile crime. The academic and juvenile crime histories of a sample of 6,000 students were tracked: 2,000 who participated in LA’s BEST and 4,000 matched controls who did not.

  • Denise Huang, Project Director and Senior Research Associate, National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Peter Goldschmidt, Assistant Professor, College of Education, California State University, Northridge; Senior Researcher, National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Regino Chávez, Director of Evaluation, LA’s BEST After School Enrichment Program, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Moderator: Marilyn C. Moses, Social Science Analyst, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Systematic reviews of criminal justice interventions. The Campbell Collaboration’s Crime & Justice Coordinating Group (CCJG) is an international network of researchers. The Group prepares, updates and rapidly disseminates systematic reviews of high-quality research on effective methods to reduce crime and delinquency and to improve the quality of justice. NIJ awarded CCJG a grant to review three criminal justice interventions intended to increase the efficacy of community policing, second responders and family programs. Panelists will discuss findings from the ongoing evaluations.

  • Alex R. Piquero, Professor, Department of Criminology And Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
  • David Weisburd, Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice and Director, Institute of Criminology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Distinguished Professor of Administration of Justice, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
  • Robert Davis, Senior Research Analyst, RAND Corp., Arlington, Va.
  • Moderator: Nancy Merritt, Chief, Justice Systems Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Taking the information highway beyond the next interchange. Law enforcement agencies are using the Internet to move beyond simply sharing crime data. Panelists will discuss new research on promising practices and underused or untapped methods for using the Internet to advance community policing and problem solving. Panelists will also explore the Chicago Internet Experiment, a study that implemented a large-scale, comprehensive, Web-based community survey and identified the challenges of transferring it to other settings. Researchers also examined whether a Web-based survey system can enhance the problem-solving process, increase community engagement and strengthen police-community relations.

  • Gary W. Cordner, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pa.
  • Dennis P. Rosenbaum, Professor of Criminology, Law and Justice and Director, Center for Research in Law and Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago, Ill.
  • Lawrence Green, Special Resource Lieutenant, Oakland Police Department, Oakland, Calif.
  • Moderator: Matthew Lysakowski, Social Science Analyst, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Terrorism in time and space. A common myth about terrorism is that it “can occur anywhere,” based on major U.S. incidents in which the terrorists “came out of nowhere.” Terrorism requires time to plan, meet, procure and prepare explosives, and to travel. This panel examines terrorist groups and incidents in time and space. The first presentation is on selected terrorist groups/incidents in the United States from 1980 to 2004, focusing on planning processes and behaviors to identify patterns that might lead to intervention prior to the incident. The second focuses on data mining to extract useful information from suspicious behavior reports by concerned citizens in Washington, D.C.

  • Brent L. Smith, Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice and Director, Terrorism Research Center, Fulbright College, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark.
  • John Hollywood, Operations Researcher, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Jeffrey Herold, Assistant Division Commander, Special Operations Division, Metropolitan Police Department, Washington, D.C.
  • Moderator: John Picarelli, Social Science Analyst, International Center, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Violence in communities: Modeling and predicting crime patterns. Using linear models and geographic information systems, researchers can examine community characteristics that influence criminal behavior. Researchers will discuss the simultaneous effects of individual-, neighborhood- and program-level factors on juvenile recidivism using a cross-classified hierarchical generalized linear model and the spatial correspondence of social and other indicators with family violence using spatial linear regression.

  • Brian Lockwood, Graduate Student/Research Assistant, Department of Criminal Justice, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Michael DeMers, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, N.M.
  • Martin T. Arnold, Geographic Information Systems Analyst, Patrick Engineering, Inc.; Adjunct Instructor, McHenry County College, Crystal Lake, Ill.
  • Moderator: Louis Tuthill, Social Science Analyst, Crime Control and Prevention Research Division, Office of Research and Evaluation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

You can run, but you can’t hide! The predominant means of locating and tracking individuals in buildings is physical inspection and observation, which places officers at risk and, in hostage situations, threatens the hostages also. Officers require the ability to locate and track individuals remotely. NIJ and other agencies have long invested in radar and other technologies as potential solutions. A member of the NIJ Sensor and Surveillance Technology Working Group will discuss the functional requirement to locate and track individuals in buildings, followed by presentations of Time Domain, Camero, and EMMDAR. The session will conclude with a discussion of the pros and cons of these three approaches.

  • Jerry Cook, Senior Applications Engineer, National Sensors, Surveillance and Biometric Technologies Center of Excellence, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Northeast, Rome, N.Y.
  • Mike Ogaard, Science and Technology Analyst, Joint Urban Operations Office, U.S. Joint Forces Command, U.S. Department of Defense, Washington, D.C.
  • Buzz Benson, Intelligence Unit and Technical Services Commander, Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Department, Atlanta, Ga.
  • Moderator: Frances J. Scott, Physical Scientist, Information and Sensor Technology Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Whose print is it really? Does confirmation bias affect the answer? Confirmation bias — the tendency to focus on data that confirms preconceived expectations — has been identified as an issue in the forensic setting. Exploring both the issues and solutions to this worldwide concern, panelists will explore the existing research on confirmation bias and new research to apply statistics in fingerprint examinations. They will also discuss articles that shed additional light on the implications of bias in fingerprint identification.

  • Itiel Dror, Cognitive Neuroscientist, University of Southampton, U.K.
  • Sargur “Hari” Srihari, Director, Center of Excellence for Document Analysis and Recognition (CEDAR), University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, N.Y.
  • Glenn Langenburg, Crime Scene Investigator, Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, St. Paul, Minn.
  • Moderator: John Paul Jones, Physical Scientist, Investigative and Forensic Sciences Division, Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.