​​NIJ Audio: Are CEDs Safe and Effective?

NIJ Conference Panel
June 2010

Thousands of law enforcement agencies throughout the United States have adopted conducted energy devices (CEDs) as a safe method to subdue individuals, but are these devices really safe? What policies should agencies adopt to ensure the proper use of this technology? This panel will discuss the physiological effects of electrical current in the human body caused by CEDs, as well as how this technology can reduce injuries to officers and suspects when appropriate policies and training are followed.

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Joseph Cecconi: National Institute of Justice

John C. Hunsaker III: Associate Chief Medical Examiner, Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet

Scott Hammack: O\'Melveny and Myers LLP

Eugene A. Paoline III: Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies, University of Central Florida

William Terrill Associate Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University

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