Domestic Radicalization and Terrorism: Interviews and Recorded Panels

The goal of NIJ’s work on terrorism is to provide community leaders with evidence-based practices for bolstering resilience and developing communitywide responses that can prevent and mitigate threats posed by terrorists.

On this page you will find interviews and recorded panels with NIJ-funded researchers that offer insight into NIJ-funded research on domestic radicalization and terrorism.

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Building Resilience Against Violent Extremism in Montgomery County
July 2016
Darryl McSwain, Assistant Chief at Montgomery County Police Department, discusses the "Montgomery County Model" to prevent domestic radicalization and violence extremism. This included working with schools support youth before they take part in negative behavior and working with researchers to develop culturally-sensitive prevention programs that are effective.
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Pathways to Violent Extremism
July 2016
John Horgan, Professor at Georgia State University, discusses the types and ideologies of lone-actor terrorists and how the bystander effect creates challenges to preventing and intervening on possible domestic radicalization situations early.
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Community-Level Efforts to Prevent Violent Extremism
March 2016
Moderator: John Picarelli, Ph.D., National Institute of Justice
Presenters:
  • John Horgan, Ph.D., Georgia State University
  • David H. Schanzer, Duke University
  • Deputy Chief Michael Downing, Los Angeles Police Department
In this video three internationally-renowned experts from the research and practitioner arenas discuss how community policing can be used to prevent violent extremism and reduce violence within communities.
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Empirical Assessment of Domestic Radicalization
February 2013
Interview with Gary Ackerman, Director for Special Projects, National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism, University of Maryland

Mr. Ackerman is conducting an empirical assessment of domestic radicalization, with an emphasis on the process of radicalization. In this interview, Ackerman explains how he is using large empirical analysis and small scale life study analysis to discover which factors might cause an individual to make the leap from illegal terrorist behavior to violent terrorist behavior.
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Lone Wolf Terrorism in America
February 2013
Interview with Mark Hamm, Ph.D., Indiana State University

Dr. Hamm is studying lone wolf terrorism in the United States and how such terrorists become radicalized. In this interview, Hamm explains the difference between mass violence and terrorism and discusses the ways in which many lone wolf terrorists use public forums to broadcast their intent to commit terrorist acts.
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Community Policing Strategies for Countering Violent Extremism
February 2013
Interview with David Schanzer, J.D., Associate Professor, Duke University and Director, Triangle Center of Terrorism and Homeland Security

Mr. Schanzer discusses his study of community policing strategies for countering violent extremism. Schanzer points out that there is a wide variety of terrorist ideologies from religious, to environmental, to economic. He is hoping to discover if particular community policing strategies are more effective in countering certain types of terrorism and building resilience against extremism.
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10th Anniversary of 9/11: Advances in Social Sciences
NIJ Conference
Plenary Panel
June 2011
Gary LaFree, Director of the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism at the University of Maryland

The tragedy of 9/11 posed unprecedented challenges to forensic science, social science, and physical science and technology — the three bedrock sciences at NIJ. Recovering from the attack and preventing another one have became topmost priorities in the 10 years since the attack. As we approach the 10th anniversary, Gary LaFree discusses how that fateful day impacted social scientific priorities and the outcomes from those changes.
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Terrorism Research Before and After 9/11
NIJ Conference
Interview
June 2011
Gary LaFree, Director of the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism at the University of Maryland
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Learning from 9/11: Forensic Science and Identifying Human Remains
NIJ Conference
Interview
June 2011
Robert Shaler, Pennsylvania State University (ret.).
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How Terrorists Learn
NIJ Conference
Interview
June 2009
Michael Kenney, Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University
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Terrorism Studies: Finding and Applying the Best Research
NIJ Conference
Panel
June 2009

Moderator: John T. Picarelli, Social Science Analyst, National Institute of Justice Panelists:
  • Michael Kenney, Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University
  • Laura Dugan, Associate Professor, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Richard Troy, Prime Minister, Department of Taoiseach, Dublin, Ireland
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Date Modified: April 28, 2017